Catalogue


Literacy in everyday life : reading and writing in early modern Dutch diaries /
by Jeroen Blaak ; translated by Beverley Jackson.
imprint
Leiden, NL : Brill, 2009.
description
x, 422 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
900417740X (Cloth), 9789004177406 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Leiden, NL : Brill, 2009.
isbn
900417740X (Cloth)
9789004177406 (Cloth)
language note
Transl. from the Dutch.
catalogue key
6970387
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jeroen Blaak is a member of the research group Egodocuments, Erasmus University Rotterdam. He has written on several early modern and modern Dutch diaries and autobiographies.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Blaak illustrates not just what kind of books these people read - even listing the titles - but also how, why, and where they read them. He writes this book from the relatively new and refreshing angle of media history, especially examining the interaction between the printed, the written, and the spoken word. Literacy in Everyday Life is an entertaining and well-documented study, with some surprising conclusions.[...] Blaak places his study in a wider international context [...]. This makes his book very readable, as well as useful for the international researcher."Mark Towsey, Dutch Crossing 34 (2010) 279-281" Literacy in Everyday Life is an entertaining and well-documented study, with some surprising conclusions. By giving detailed information on these diarists' lives, their reading behaviour is placed into context, and is linked to everyday social practices. In this way, Blaak identifies how books dominated conversations, or how ideas influenced the readers' choice or, more importantly, the reception of books. He is able to nuance findings from traditional book historical research [...] Blaak places his study in a wider international context by referring to foreign studies, and especially to English research. This makes his book very readable, as well as useful for the international researcher."Mirella Marini in Dutch Crossing vol. 34, no. 3, November 2010
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
Readers with an interest in book history, the history of reading, literacy, media and the history of communication, as well as those interested in the history of autobiographical writing.
Main Description
Until recently, historians of reading have concentrated on book ownership and trying to map out a history of who read what. The reading experience has been a subject more difficult to research. As has been pointed out before, egodocuments can be valuable sources in this case. Following this lead, "Literacy in Everyday Life" focuses upon four early modern Dutch diaries in which readers document their daily life and in which they recount their reading. In the analysis, other ways in which these four readers communicated are also addressed, especially speech and writing. This book therefore provides an insight into the possible uses of literacy and the interaction between the printed, written and spoken word in the early modern Dutch Republic.
Main Description
Until recently, historians of reading have concentrated on book ownership and trying to map out a history of who read what. The reading experience has been a subject more difficult to research. As has been pointed out before, egodocuments can be valuable sources in this case. Following this lead,Literacy in Everyday Lifefocuses upon four early modern Dutch diaries in which readers document their daily life and in which they recount their reading. In the analysis, other ways in which these four readers communicated are also addressed, especially speech and writing. This book therefore provides an insight into the possible uses of literacy and the interaction between the printed, written and spoken word in the early modern Dutch Republic.
Long Description
Until recently, historians of reading have concentrated on book ownership and trying to map out a history of who read what. The reading experience has been a subject more difficult to research. As has been pointed out before, egodocuments can be valuable sources in this case. Following this lead, Literacy in Everyday Life focuses upon four early modern Dutch diaries in which readers document their daily life and in which they recount their reading. In the analysis, other ways in which these four readers communicated are also addressed, especially speech and writing. This book therefore provides an insight into the possible uses of literacy and the interaction between the printed, written and spoken word in the early modern Dutch Republic.
Main Description
Focusing on four Dutch diaries from different periods of the early modern age, this book describes in detail the diversified use of reading in everyday life, examining it in a wider context of communication that also includes writing and speech.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
List of Illustrationsp. xi
List of Abbreviations and Archive Namesp. xiii
Historical Research on Reading and Writing: From Book Ownership to the Use of Mediap. 1
The history of readingp. 5
The history of reading as a research fieldp. 7
A different perspective: Reading within the framework of media historyp. 10
Research on historical readersp. 15
Research on historical reading behaviourp. 25
Egodocuments as source materialp. 32
Structure of the bookp. 38
Mirror of Literacy: Reading and Writing in the Diary (1624) of David Beckp. 41
A German schoolmaster in the Dutch Republicp. 43
'Mirror of my life'p. 45
The conversation of the dayp. 49
Writing habitsp. 54
Conversation at a distance: correspondencep. 55
Writing at schoolp. 60
Income and expenditure in writingp. 64
Paper poetry: the oeuvre of the poet David Beckp. 65
Writing poetry and everyday lifep. 69
Publication in manuscript formp. 72
'Mousing and rummaging': Beck's reading behaviourp. 76
Handwritten readingp. 77
Poetic taste: Beck's reading of printed textsp. 79
Aging French poems and topical Dutch prosep. 84
Beck's books in other sourcesp. 86
'Nosing around' in bookshops or at the Binnenhofp. 89
Books in everyday lifep. 93
Diverse ways of readingp. 99
Reading in order to writep. 105
Final remarksp. 109
Aristocratic Literacy: Pieter Teding van Berkhout and his 'Journal'(1669-1712)p. 113
The life of a gentleman of rankp. 115
'Journal contenant mes occupationsp. 120
The aristocratisation of everyday conversation?p. 126
Putting pen to paperp. 131
Written contacts: correspondence and writing stylep. 132
Writing and family historyp. 136
Political notesp. 139
A lifetime of readingp. 142
Teding van Berkhout's libraryp. 142
A historical tastep. 145
Reading à la modep. 153
An unusual taste?p. 155
Purchases and giftsp. 160
The delights of country lifep. 164
Reading a bookp. 169
Reading for edification and entertainmentp. 179
Final remarksp. 185
Aural and Eyewitness Testimony: Reading, Writing, and Discussions of Current Affairs in Jan de Boer's chronological journal (1747-1758)p. 189
The life of an Amsterdam clerkp. 191
The diary or 'journal' of Jan de Boerp. 196
Historiography of the newsp. 204
The flow of information: De Boer's news sourcesp. 208
News in the streetp. 209
News on printed paperp. 214
The news of 1755p. 217
News from many sidesp. 219
Reading the news: printed matter in the diaryp. 222
Newspapersp. 225
Newspaper reports in the diaryp. 229
Information and discussion in pamphletsp. 234
News in pamphletsp. 237
'Only an oortje': the distribution of pamphletsp. 241
The anonymous author of the pamphlet 'Pro Patria'p. 247
Pamphlet readers and their responsesp. 251
Other informative publications: ordinances, periodicals and printsp. 256
News as historyp. 260
Final remarksp. 262
A Devout Reader and Writer: Literacy in Jacoba van Thiel's 'Account-Book of the Soul' (1767-1770)p. 265
A life lived amid the clergyp. 267
Daily register or 'account-book of the soul'p. 272
Pious conversationp. 281
A devout Christian woman with a penp. 288
Pious correspondencep. 289
'Somewhat free from the earth': on keeping a diaryp. 293
Piety with books: Van Thiel's readingp. 297
A religious gluttonp. 297
Old or new?p. 305
Readers of pious literature and readers of novelsp. 307
The parsonage libraryp. 310
Relatives and women in Luchtmans' shopp. 315
Purchases and giftsp. 317
Reading and the daily strugglep. 319
Daily books: Van Thiel's modes of readingp. 323
Nourishing the soulp. 332
Final remarksp. 338
Literacy in Everyday Lifep. 341
Speech, writing and readingp. 342
Forms of reading behaviourp. 344
Reading, Behaviour in Figuresp. 349
Tides of Books Mentioned in the Diariesp. 355
List of Sourcesp. 381
Bibliographyp. 387
Indexp. 415
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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