Catalogue


The seduction of Brazil : the Americanization of Brazil during World War II /
Antonio Pedro Tota ; translated by Lorena B. Ellis ; foreword and commentary by Daniel J. Greenberg.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2009.
description
xxi, 159 p.
ISBN
0292719930 (alk. paper), 9780292719934 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2009.
isbn
0292719930 (alk. paper)
9780292719934 (alk. paper)
general note
"Not an exact translation of the first edition of O imperialismo sedutor, published in Brazil in 2000; it is based on a text revised by the author. It also includes historical notes by Daniel J. Greenberg"--T.p. verso.
catalogue key
6964294
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-04-01:
In this translation of O Imperialismo Sedutor (published in Brazil in 2000), Tota (Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo) offers an analysis of US-Brazil relations during the Good Neighbor Policy era. The author's main contribution is his examination of the growth of cultural exchanges between Americans and Brazilians in relationship to the political-diplomatic imperatives of both US and Brazilian governments during WW II, as well as to the expansion of mass culture markets in both countries. Tota's exploration of the representations and distortions of Brazilians and Americans in the cultural programming (film, music, radio shows, and newspaper reporting both in the US and Brazil) financed by Nelson Rockefeller's Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs constitutes one of the book's strongest sections. Due to the lack of data on the consumption of images of the "American way of life" by nonelite Brazilians, Tota's attempt to judge whether the invasion of US mass culture resulted in the "Americanization" of Brazil is less successful. This study makes an excellent contrast to Bryan McCann's Hello, Hello Brazil (2004) and its focus on the relationship between the marketplace and national culture in Brazil. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. S. Santos University of Akron
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of the US wartime policy to win the hearts & minds of the Brazilian people, regarded as a vital strategic aim by the Roosevelt administration. Antonio Pedro Tota examines how the policy was put into effect and with what results.
Main Description
Following completion of the U.S. air base in Natal, Brazil, in 1942, U.S. airmen departing for North Africa during World War II communicated with Brazilian mechanics with a thumbs-up before starting their engines. This sign soon replaced the Brazilian tradition of touching the earlobe to indicate agreement, friendship, and all that was positive and good--yet another indication of the Americanization of Brazil under way during this period. In this translation of O Imperialismo Sedutor, Antonio Pedro Tota considers both the Good Neighbor Policy and broader cultural influences to argue against simplistic theories of U.S. cultural imperialism and exploitation. He shows that Brazilians actively interpreted, negotiated, and reconfigured U.S. culture in a process of cultural recombination. The market, he argues, was far more important in determining the nature of this cultural exchange than state-directed propaganda efforts because Brazil already was primed to adopt and disseminate American culture within the framework of its own rapidly expanding market for mass culture. By examining the motives and strategies behind rising U.S. influence and its relationship to a simultaneous process of cultural and political centralization in Brazil, Tota shows that these processes were not contradictory, but rather mutually reinforcing. The Seduction of Brazil brings greater sophistication to both Brazilian and American understanding of the forces at play during this period, and should appeal to historians as well as students of Latin America, culture, and communications.
Main Description
Following completion of the U.S. air base in Natal, Brazil, in 1942, U.S. airmen departing for North Africa during World War II communicated with Brazilian mechanics with a thumbs-up before starting their engines. This sign soon replaced the Brazilian tradition of touching the earlobe to indicate agreement, friendship, and all that was positive and good--yet another indication of the Americanization of Brazil under way during this period. In this translation ofO Imperialismo Sedutor, Antonio Pedro Tota considers both the Good Neighbor Policy and broader cultural influences to argue against simplistic theories of U.S. cultural imperialism and exploitation. He shows that Brazilians actively interpreted, negotiated, and reconfigured U.S. culture in a process of cultural recombination. The market, he argues, was far more important in determining the nature of this cultural exchange than state-directed propaganda efforts because Brazil already was primed to adopt and disseminate American culture within the framework of its own rapidly expanding market for mass culture. By examining the motives and strategies behind rising U.S. influence and its relationship to a simultaneous process of cultural and political centralization in Brazil, Tota shows that these processes were not contradictory, but rather mutually reinforcing. The Seduction of Brazilbrings greater sophistication to both Brazilian and American understanding of the forces at play during this period, and should appeal to historians as well as students of Latin America, culture, and communications.
Main Description
Following completion of the U.S. air base in Natal, Brazil, in 1942, U.S. airmen departing for North Africa during World War II communicated with Brazilian mechanics with a thumbs-up before starting their engines. This sign soon replaced the Brazilian tradition of touching the earlobe to indicate agreement, friendship, and all that was positive and good-yet another indication of the Americanization of Brazil under way during this period. In this translation ofO Imperialismo Sedutor, Antonio Pedro Tota considers both the Good Neighbor Policy and broader cultural influences to argue against simplistic theories of U.S. cultural imperialism and exploitation. He shows that Brazilians actively interpreted, negotiated, and re-configured U.S. culture in a process of cultural recombination. The market, he argues, was far more important in determining the nature of this cultural exchange than state-directed propaganda efforts because Brazil already was primed to adopt and disseminate American culture within the framework of its own rapidly expanding market for mass culture. By examining the motives and strategies behind rising U.S. influence and its relationship to a simultaneous process of cultural and political centralization in Brazil, Tota shows that these processes were not contradictory, but rather mutually reinforcing.The Seduction of Brazilbrings greater sophistication to both Brazilian and American understanding of the forces at play during this period, and should appeal to historians as well as students of Latin America, culture, and communications.
Main Description
Following completion of the U.S. air base in Natal, Brazil, In 1942, U.S. airmen departing for North Africa during World War II communicated with Brazilian mechanics with a thumbs-up before starting their engines. This sign soon replaced the Brazilian tradition of touching the earlobe to indicate agreement, friendship, and all that was positive and good_yet another indication of the Americanization of Brazil under way during this period. In this translation ofO Imperialismo Sedutor, Antonio Pedro Tota considers both the Good Neighbor Policy and broader cultural influences to argue against simplistic theories of U.S. cultural imperialism and exploitation. He shows that Brazilians actively interpreted, negotiated, and re-configured U.S. culture in a process of cultural recombination. The market, he argues, was far more important in determining the nature of this cultural exchange than state-directed propaganda efforts because Brazil already was primed to adopt and disseminate American culture within the framework of its own rapidly expanding market for mass culture. By examining the motives and strategies behind rising U.S. influence and its relationship to a simultaneous process of cultural and political centralization in Brazil, Tota shows that these processes were not contradictory, but rather mutually reinforcing.The Seduction of Brazilbrings greater sophistication to both Brazilian and American understanding of the forces at play during this period, and should appeal to historians as well as students of Latin America, culture, and communications.

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