Catalogue


Catholic communities in Protestant states : Britain and the Netherlands, c.1570-1720 /
edited by Benjamin Kaplan ... [et al.].
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xiv, 274 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0719079063 (Cloth), 9780719079061 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0719079063 (Cloth)
9780719079061 (Cloth)
contents note
1. Shifting identities in hostile settings. Towards a comparison of the Catholic communities in early modern Britain and the Northern NetherlandsWillem Frijhoff 2. Cooperative Confessionalisation: Lay-clerical collaboration in Dutch Catholic Communities during the Golden AgeCharles H. Parker 3. 'So they become contemptible': Clergy and Laity in a Mission TerritoryMichael Mullett 4. Integration vs. Segregation: Religiously Mixed Marriage and the 'Verzuiling' Model of Dutch SocietyBenjamin J. Kaplan 5. 'Getting on' and 'getting along' in parish and town: Catholics and their neighbours in England William Sheils, 6. Burying the Dead; Reliving the Past: Ritual, Resentment and Sacred Space in the Dutch RepublicJudith Pollmann 7. Beads, books and bare ruined choirs: Transmutations of Catholic ritual life in Protestant EnglandAlexandra Walsham 8. The Southern Netherlands Connection: Networks of Support and PatronagePaul Arblaster 9. Priests, Nuns, Presses and Prayers: The Southern Netherlands and the Contours of English CatholicismClaire Walker 10. Second-class yet self-confident: Catholics in the Dutch Generality LandsCharles de Mooij11.Between Conflict and Coexistence: The Catholic Community in Ireland as a 'Visible Underground Church' in the Late Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth CenturiesUte Lotz-Heumann12. Orphans and Students: Recruiting Boys and Girls for the Holland MissionJoke Spaans 13.Harbourers and Housekeepers: Catholic women in England 1570-1720Marie B. Rowlands 14.Paintings for clandestine Catholic churches in the Republic: typically Dutch?Xander van Eck15.Cultures of Dissent: English Catholics and the Visual Arts.Richard L. Williams16.Conclusion: Catholic Communities in Protestant States, Britain and the Netherlands c1580-1720Ben Kaplan and Judith Pollmann
general note
Papers presented at the triennial Britain and the Netherlands conference, held in Amsterdam and Leiden in August, 2006.
catalogue key
6963469
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Benjamin Kaplan is Professor of Dutch History at University College London and holds a joint appointment at the University of Amsterdam Bob Moore is Professor of Twentieth-Century European History at the University of Sheffield Henk Van Nierop is Professor of Early Modern History at the Univeristy of Amsterdam and Director of the Amsterdam Centre for the Study of the Golden Age Judith Pollmann is Professor of the History and Culture of the Dutch Republic at Leiden University
Summaries
Main Description
This volume is the first to compare the position of Catholic minorities in England and the Dutch Republic. Looking beyond the tales of persecution that have dominated traditional historiography, the contributors focus on the realities of Catholic existence. Thematically organized, the book explores Catholicism as a minority culture that resorted to unorthodox means, both to retain its own identity, and to survive in a hostile political environment. It examines ritual, material culture, international networks, and above all relations: between laity and clergy, men and women, Catholics and Protestants. By highlighting differences as well as similarities between the English and Dutch experiences, Catholic Communities in Protestant States will help both undergraduate readers and specialists to rethink the history of Catholicism and the consequences of minority status for religious communities.
Main Description
This volume is the first to compare the position of Catholic minorities in England and the Dutch Republic. Looking beyond the tales of persecution that have dominated traditional historiography, the contributors focus on the realities of Catholic existence. Thematically organized, the book explores Catholicism as a minority culture that resorted to unorthodox means, both to retain its own identity, and to survive in a hostile political environment. It examines ritual, material culture, international networks, and above all relations: between laity and clergy, men and women, Catholics and Protestants. By highlighting differences as well as similarities between the English and Dutch experiences,Catholic Communities in Protestant Stateswill help both undergraduate readers and specialists to rethink the history of Catholicism and the consequences of minority status for religious communities.
Description for Reader
This volume is the first to compare the position of Catholic minorities in England and the Dutch Republic. Looking beyond the tales of persecution that have dominated traditional historiography, the contributors focus on the realities of Catholic existence.Thematically organised, the book explores Catholicism as a minority culture that resorted to unorthodox means, both to retain its own identity, and to survive in a hostile political environment. It examines ritual, material culture, international networks, and above all relations: between laity and clergy, men and women, Catholics and Protestants By highlighting differences as well as similarities between the English and Dutch experiences, *Catholic communities in Protestant states* will help both undergraduate readers and specialists to rethink the history of Catholicism and the consequences of minority status for religious communities.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study examines the history of Catholic communities in two officially Protestant lands. It offers insights into the effects of minority status, legal sanctions, and in some cases, persecution, not just on Catholics but on religious communities generally.
Back Cover Copy
This volume is the first to compare the position of Catholic minorities in England and the Dutch Republic. Looking beyond the tales of persecution that have dominated traditional historiography, the contributors focus on the realities of Catholic existence. Thematically organised, the book explores Catholicism as a minority culture that resorted to unorthodox means, both to retain its own identity, and to survive in a hostile political environment. It examines ritual, material culture, international networks, and above all relations: between laity and clergy, men and women, Catholics and Protestants. Much of Baroque Europe was dominated religiously by the Roman Catholic Church, a Church Militant. Not so seventeenth-century England or the Dutch Republic, where Catholicism was a minority religion. In these two officially Protestant lands, Catholics practiced their faith in secret and were excluded from public life. Political pamphlets reviled them as a fifth column that plotted to bring foreign domination and overthrow the Protestant establishment. For Rome, meanwhile, England and the Dutch Republic became mission territories that proved difficult to staff and even more difficult to manage. By highlighting differences as well as similarities between the English and Dutch experiences, Catholic minorities in protestant states will help both undergraduate readers and specialists to rethink the history of Catholicism and the consequences of minority status for religious communities.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. xi
List of contributorsp. xii
Prefacep. xiii
Shifting identities in hostile settings: towards a comparison of the Catholic communities in early modern Britain and the Northern Netherlandsp. 1
Cooperative confessionalisation: lay-clerical collaboration in Dutch Catholic communities during the Golden Agep. 18
'So they become contemptible': clergy and laity in a mission territoryp. 33
Integration vs segregation: religiously mixed marriage and the 'verzuiling' model of Dutch Societyp. 48
'Getting on' and 'getting along' in parish and town: Catholics and their neighbours in Englandp. 67
Burying the dead; reliving the past: ritual, resentment and sacred space in the Dutch Republicp. 84
Beads, books and bare ruined choirs: transmutations of Catholic ritual life in Protestant Englandp. 103
The Southern Netherlands connection: networks of support and patronagep. 123
Priests, nuns, presses and prayers: the Southern Netherlands and the contours of English Catholicismp. 139
Second-class yet self-confident: Catholics in the Dutch Generality Landsp. 156
Between conflict and coexistence: the Catholic community in Ireland as a 'visible underground church' in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuriesp. 168
Orphans and students: recruiting boys and girls for the Holland Missionp. 183
Harbourers and housekeepers: Catholic women in England 1570-1720p. 200
Paintings for clandestine Catholic churches in the Republic: typically Dutch?p. 216
Cultures of dissent: English Catholics and the visual artsp. 230
Conclusion: Catholic communities in Protestant states, Britain and the Netherlands c.1580-1720p. 249
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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