Catalogue


U.S. foreign policy towards Apartheid South Africa, 1948-1994 : conflict of interests /
Alex Thomson.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
description
x, 249 p.
ISBN
1403972273, 9781403972279
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
isbn
1403972273
9781403972279
catalogue key
6963444
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Alex Thomson is Principal Lecturer in Politics at Coventry University in the United Kingdom. His previous publications include Incomplete Engagement: US Foreign Policy Towards the Republic of South Africa, 1981-1988 and A Glossary of U.S. Government and Politics
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-09-01:
The subtitle refers to strategic, economic, and human rights concerns that shaped US policies vis-a-vis South Africa throughout the Cold War. As Thomson (Coventry Univ., UK) explains, those groups of interests were incompatible and impossible to balance in a coherent fashion. Initially, strategic concerns were dominant. Subsequently, the UN arms embargo proved to be the most consistently effective sanction the West imposed against the Republic of South Africa. Thomson's mostly chronological account of efforts by US presidential administrations and legislators to discourage the odious effects of apartheid provides a complex, fascinating narrative. Although there were attempts to use positive sanctions to influence Pretoria, every US administration opposed negative sanctions (although the Carter administration used vigorous rhetoric in demanding changes). It was not until the US Congress overrode President Reagan's veto of the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986 that economic interests were subordinated to human rights concerns. The book includes tabular data on the trade relationship between the two countries. This is a balanced, thoroughly researched study, rich in nuance. It will be of great value to scholars of US foreign policy and diplomacy. Essential for scholars. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. P. G. Conway SUNY College at Oneonta
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a balanced, thoroughly researched study, rich in nuance. It will be of great value to scholars of US foreign policy and diplomacy. Essential for scholars. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels." -CHOICE
"This is a balanced, thoroughly researched study, rich in nuance. It will be of great value to scholars of US foreign policy and diplomacy. Essential for scholars.Summing Up:Highly recommended. All readership levels." -CHOICE
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This book will chart the evolution of US foreign policy towards South Africa, beginning in 1948 when the architects of apartheid, the Nationalist Party, came to power. The study will extend through the holding of the 1994 elections, when the African National Congress of South Africa (ANC) formed this country's first non-racial democratic government. Dr. Thomson highlights three sets of conflicting Western interests: strategic, economic and human rights. This is a chronological survey of successive administrations, charting how US policy towards apartheid in South Africa reached a damaging watershed.
Main Description
This book provides a full account of the development of U.S. foreign policy towards South Africa from apartheid's inception in 1948 through to the fall of white minority rule in 1994. Drawing upon documents sourced in key archives, the twists and turns of the U.S. response to Pretoria's racial policies are pieced together. This history starts with Washington D.C.'s first expressions of concern brought forth under the Truman Administration. It continues via Kennedy's arms embrargo, Kissinger's 'Communication' strategy, and Carter's confrontational approach, and ends with the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986 and the birth of the 'new' South Africa in the early 1990s. It is an account history of conflicting interests, with strategic and economic concerns always clashing with U.S. human rights priorities. Book jacket.
Main Description
This book charts the evolution of U.S. foreign policy towards South Africa during the apartheid era, beginning in 1948 and extending through the 1994 elections and the establishment of the country's first non-racial democratic government. Thomson highlights three sets of conflicting Western interests: strategic, economic, and human rights.
Description for Bookstore
This book charts the evolution of U.S. foreign policy towards South Africa during the apartheid era, beginning in 1948 and extending through the 1994 elections and the establishment of the country's first non-racial democratic government.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text provides a full account of the development of US foreign policy towards South Africa from apartheid's inception in 1948 through to the fall of white minority rule in 1994.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
A Balancing Act: Key U.S. Interests and Apartheid South Africap. 5
"Mutual Cooperation" and "Serious Concern": The Truman and Eisenhower Administrations, 1948-1961p. 17
"The Best of Both Worlds": The Kennedy Administration, 1961-1963p. 31
"A Frustratingly Difficult Set of Policy Considerations to Juggle": The Johnson Administration, 1963-1969p. 47
"The Whites Are Here to Stay ...": The Nixon and Ford Administrations, 1969-1977p. 63
"Andy Young Is Not a Policy": The Carter Administration, 1977-1981p. 89
"Neither the Clandestine Embrace nor the Polecat Treatment": The Reagan Administration, 1981-1984p. 111
"There Are Occasions When Quiet Diplomacy Is Not Enough": The Reagan Administration, 1984-1986p. 129
"Sanctions by Themselves Do Not Represent a Policy": The Reagan, Bush, and Clinton Administrations, 1986-1994p. 149
Conclusionp. 169
Notesp. 175
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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