Catalogue


The thirteenth apostle : what the Gospel of Judas really says /
April D. DeConick.
edition
Rev. ed.
imprint
London : Continuum, 2009.
description
xxxii, 259 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1847065686 (Paper), 9781847065681 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Continuum, 2009.
isbn
1847065686 (Paper)
9781847065681 (Paper)
contents note
The silenced voice -- A Gnostic catechism -- A mistaken gospel -- The Gospel of Judas in English translation -- Judas the confessor -- Judas the demon -- Judas the sacrificer -- Judas the star -- The magical Judas -- An ancient Gnostic parody.
general note
Previous ed.: 2007.
catalogue key
6957639
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
April D. DeConick is the Islam Carroll and Percy E. Turner Professor of Biblical Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at Rice University, Texas, USA. She is the author of numerous books, including Recovering the Original Gospel of Thomas: A History of the Gospel and Its Growth (T. T. Clark, 2005).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-05-01:
DeConick (Rice Univ.) is not nearly so well known to the reading public as other Gospel of Judas scholars, such as Ehrman, King, and Pagels, all of whom have written one or more books on this justly exciting ancient document. But DeConick's volume, offering as it does a substantial revision of the current consensus, deserves as much attention as these other authors' works. Her primary contention is that earlier scholars, whom she terms "the National Geographic team," mistranslated several key passages, as a result of which Judas became the hero of the Gospel, rather than the villain that (according to DeConick) he was actually portrayed as. Whether or not DeConick's arguments ultimately carry the day (and this is a matter that specialists will surely debate), her book contains a vast amount of useful information, placing the Gospel in its historical and theological context in a manner that is very accessible to the general public. Additionally, many readers will appreciate her autobiographical sections, her analysis of contemporary Jesus films, and her annotated bibliography. As such, her book deserves a place in libraries along with other essential Judas publications. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers; general readers. L. J. Greenspoon Creighton University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"April DeConick makes a brilliant contribution to the conversation about this puzzling gospel, whose Sethian "bitter voice" she hears as a sophisticated, ironic parody of apostolic Christianity's atonement-by-sacrifice theology and cultic activity. Engagement with the gospel of Mark and with movie versions of Judas bring first and second century sectarian conflicts into contemporary focus. I highly recommend this work for all scholars and students of the apocryphal and canonical gospels." Jane D. Schaberg, Professor of Religious Studies, University of Detroit, Mercy, USA.
"Turning upside down the most accepted understanding of the Gospel of Judas (Codex Tchacos), April DeConick gives a radically new reading of this Coptic apocryphon, based on her fresh, personal translation. She unveils the techniques of an ancient author, a Sethian Gnostic of the 2nd century CE, who used mockery and sarcasm to define Judas' role in relation to Jesus on one side and the Apostles on the other. A deep original sight is offered on the intense and troubled story of early Christianity with its rival, opponent streams. Those who are interested in the Gnostic adventure cannot miss The Thirteenth Apostle." Professor Madeleine Scopello, Director of Research at the National Centre of Scientific Research Sorbonne, Paris
Introductory article and Q&&A session on www.thesheepdip.co.uk
April DeConick makes a brilliant contribution to the conversation about this puzzling gospel, whose Sethian &"bitter voice&" she hears as a sophisticated, ironic parody of apostolic Christianity's atonement-by-sacrifice theology and cultic activity. Engagement with the gospel of Mark and with movie versions of Judas bring first and second century sectarian conflicts into contemporary focus. I highly recommend this work for all scholars and students of the apocryphal and canonical gospels. Jane D. Schaberg, Professor of Religious Studies, University of Detroit, Mercy, USA.
"'Yet you will do worse than all of them. For the man that clothes me, you will sacrifice him.' Thus speaks Jesus to Judas Iscariot, according to April DeConick's new translation of the Gospel of Judas. But far from being a demand addressed by Jesus to his favorite disciple, as the first editors of the Gospel of Judas claimed, this sentence is both a prediction of Judas' betrayal of Jesus, and a condemnation of it. In her discussions of this passage and many others, April DeConick's new book provides solutions to major issues raised by this fascinating but frequently misunderstood and misinterpreted text." Louis Painchaud, Ph.D., Universite Laval, Canada
"April DeConick created quite a storm with the publication of The Thirteenth Apostle, for her book overturned the then prevailing interpretation of the Gospel of Judas, according to which Judas Iscariot is presented as a hero and intimate disciple. This new edition of her book has been up-dated and expanded to include two entirely new chapters. Anyone wishing to know "what the Gospel of Judas really says" must read this book. It is clearly the most important book yet published on this much-misunderstood gospel." -& Birger A. Pearson Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
'"Yet you will do worse than all of them. For the man that clothes me, you will sacrifice him." Thus speaks Jesus to Judas Iscariot, according to April DeConick's new translation of the Gospel of Judas. But far from being a demand addressed by Jesus to his favorite disciple, as the first editors of the Gospel of Judas claimed, this sentence is both a prediction of Judas' betrayal of Jesus, and a condemnation of it. In her discussions of this passage and many others, April DeConick's new book provides solutions to major issues raised by this fascinating but frequently misunderstood and misinterpreted text.' Louis Painchaud, Ph.D., Universite Laval, Canada
"April DeConick created quite a storm with the publication of The Thirteenth Apostle, for her book overturned the then prevailing interpretation of the Gospel of Judas, according to which Judas Iscariot is presented as a hero and intimate disciple. This new edition of her book has been up-dated and expanded to include two entirely new chapters. Anyone wishing to know "what the Gospel of Judas really says" must read this book. It is clearly the most important book yet published on this much-misunderstood gospel." - Birger A. Pearson Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Introductory article and Q&A session on www.thesheepdip.co.uk
"This book is a very readable presentation of the Gospel of Judas and a good introduction to the competing early Christian traditions vying for dominance in the in the second and third centuries. DeConick provides her original English translation in full, as well as significant commentary on the text. Maps and diagrams enhance the readability and three appendices provide an annotated bibliography, a synopsis of Sethian Gnostic literature, and a collection of excerpts from the Church Fathers on the Gospel of Judas. Endnotes along with indices of authors, biblical references, and ancient texts, complete the volume." --Barbara E. Bowe RSCJ, Catholic Library World
&"This book is a very readable presentation of the Gospel of Judas and a good introduction to the competing early Christian traditions vying for dominance in the in the second and third centuries. DeConick provides her original English translation in full, as well as significant commentary on the text. Maps and diagrams enhance the readability and three appendices provide an annotated bibliography, a synopsis of Sethian Gnostic literature, and a collection of excerpts from the Church Fathers on the Gospel of Judas. Endnotes along with indices of authors, biblical references, and ancient texts, complete the volume.&" --Barbara E. Bowe RSCJ, Catholic Library World
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Summaries
Main Description
In 2006 National Geographic released the first English translation of the Gospel of Judas, a second-century text discovered in Egypt in the 1970s. The translation caused a sensation because it seemed to overturn the popular image of Judas the betrayer and
Main Description
The first book to challenge The National Geographic version of the Gospel of Judas, The Thirteenth Apostle is sure to inspire to fresh debate around this most infamous of biblical figures. In 2006 The National G eographic Society released the first English translation of the Gospel of Judas, a second-century text discovered in Egypt in the 1970s. The translation caused a sensation because it seemed to overturn the popular image of Judas the betrayer and instead presented a benevolent Judas who was a friend of Jesus. In The Thirteenth Apostle , April DeConick offers a new translation of the Gospel of Judas that seriously challenges The National Geographic interpretation. Inspired by The National Geographic Society's efforts to piece together this ancient manuscript, DeConick sought out the original Coptic text and began her own translation: "I didn't find the sublime Judas, at least not in Coptic. What I found were a series of English translation choices made by the National Geographic team, choices that permitted a different Judas to emerge in the English translation than in the Coptic original. Judas was not only not sublime, he was far more demonic than any Judas I know in any other piece of early Christian literature, Gnostic or otherwise." -April D. DeConick
Bowker Data Service Summary
April DeConick offers a new translation of the Gospel of Judas, one which seriously challenges the National Geographic interpretation of a good Judas. This edition also includes a new chapter called 'Judas the Star'.
Long Description
The first book to challenge The National Geographic version of the Gospel of Judas, The Thirteenth Apostle is sure to inspire to fresh debate around this most infamous of biblical figures. In 2006 The National G eographic Society released the first English translation of the Gospel of Judas, a second-century text discovered in Egypt in the 1970s. The translation caused a sensation because it seemed to overturn the popular image of Judas the betrayer and instead presented a benevolent Judas who was a friend of Jesus. In The Thirteenth Apostle, April DeConick offers a new translation of the Gospel of Judas that seriously challenges The National Geographic interpretation. Inspired by The National Geographic Society's efforts to piece together this ancient manuscript, DeConick sought out the original Coptic text and began her own translation: "I didn't find the sublime Judas, at least not in Coptic. What I found were a series of English translation choices made by the National Geographic team, choices that permitted a different Judas to emerge in the English translation than in the Coptic original. Judas was not only not sublime, he was far more demonic than any Judas I know in any other piece of early Christian literature, Gnostic or otherwise." April D. DeConick >
Main Description
The first book to challenge The National Geographic version of the Gospel of Judas,The Thirteenth Apostleis sure to inspire to fresh debate around this most infamous of biblical figures. In 2006 The National G eographic Society released the first English translation of the Gospel of Judas, a second-century text discovered in Egypt in the 1970s. The translation caused a sensation because it seemed to overturn the popular image of Judas the betrayer and instead presented a benevolent Judas who was a friend of Jesus. InThe Thirteenth Apostle, April DeConick offers a new translation of the Gospel of Judas that seriously challenges The National Geographic interpretation. Inspired by The National Geographic Society's efforts to piece together this ancient manuscript, DeConick sought out the original Coptic text and began her own translation: "I didn't find the sublime Judas, at least not in Coptic. What I found were a series of English translation choices made by the National Geographic team, choices that permitted a different Judas to emerge in the English translation than in the Coptic original. Judas was not only not sublime, he was far more demonic than any Judas I know in any other piece of early Christian literature, Gnostic or otherwise." -April D. DeConick
Main Description
In 2006 National Geographic released the first English translation of the Gospel of Judas, a second-century text discovered in Egypt in the 1970s. The translation caused a sensation because it seemed to overturn the popular image of Judas the betrayer and instead presented a benevolent Judas who was a friend of Jesus. In The Thirteenth Apostle April DeConick offers a new translation of the Gospel of Judas which seriously challenges the National Geographic interpretation of a good Judas. Inspired by the efforts of the National Geographic team to piece together this ancient manuscript, DeConick sought out the original Coptic text and began her own translation, within the previously overlooked context of a Christianity in the second century that was sectarian and conflicted. The Thirteenth Apostle is sure to inspire to fresh debate around this most infamous of biblical figures.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Timelinep. xiv
Preface to the Revised Editionp. xvii
Preface to the First Editionp. xviii
An Unfamiliar Story
The Silenced Voicep. 3
A Gnostic Catechismp. 26
Translation Matters
A Mistaken Gospelp. 49
The Gospel of Judas in English Translationp. 67
Good Old Judas?
Judas the Confessorp. 100
Judas the Demonp. 117
Judas the Sacrificerp. 134
Judas the Starp. 149
The Magical Judasp. 172
An Ancient Gnostic Parodyp. 191
Epiloguep. 199
Further Readingp. 206
A Synopsis of Sethian Gnostic Literaturep. 218
Testimony from the Church Fathers on the Gospel of Judasp. 225
Q&A with April DeConickp. 229
Notesp. 234
Index of Authorsp. 250
Index of Referencesp. 252
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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