Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

United in diversity? : comparing social models in Europe and America /
edited by Jens Alber and Neil Gilbert.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xiv, 450 p.
ISBN
0195376633 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780195376630 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0195376633 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780195376630 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6956762
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book provides an outstanding example of comparative studies at their best. A fine collection of top-notch essays."--Amitai Etzioni, author of New Common Ground "...It is rare that a compilation of essays tackles so important a set of topics so successfully. Indeed, collectively the essays here amount to an extensive and profound meditation on the state of the western world and the divergences and rifts within it."--Peter Baldwin, Professor of History, University of California, Los Angeles "Are the United States and Europe on diverging trajectories? Jens Alber and Neil Gilbert have compiled an excellent collection of studies on commonalities and variations between European societies and the United States. The volume includes theoretically informed comparative analyses of characteristics of the state, democracy and social citizenship, and of selected policy outcomes, and represents a timely and inspiring contribution to an understanding of how the present-day American and European societies are developing."--Stein Kuhnle, Professor of Comparative Politics, University of Bergen and Professor of Comparative Social Policy, Hertie School of Governance "Unity in Diversity? is both successor and 21st century antithesis to Werner Sombart's 1906 Why is There No Socialism in the United States?, which called attention to the lack of a major American socialist movement and challenged generations of social scientists to compare political and social well-being in the United States and Europe. The chapters collected here compare contemporary democracy, electoral participation, public expenditure patterns, poverty, employment, social mobility, educational opportunity, and immigration, finding at least as much similarity as difference. Alber and Gilbert conclude-at the start of a global economic crisis-the two sides of the Atlantic may now well be united by common goals, achieved to different degrees by marginally different means."--Stephan Leibfried, Professor of Public and Social Policy, University of Bremen
"This book provides an outstanding example of comparative studies at their best. A fine collection of top-notch essays."--Amitai Etzioni, author ofNew Common Ground "...It is rare that a compilation of essays tackles so important a set of topics so successfully. Indeed, collectively the essays here amount to an extensive and profound meditation on the state of the western world and the divergences and rifts within it."--Peter Baldwin, Professor of History, University of California, Los Angeles "Are the United States and Europe on diverging trajectories? Jens Alber and Neil Gilbert have compiled an excellent collection of studies on commonalities and variations between European societies and the United States. The volume includes theoretically informed comparative analyses of characteristics of the state, democracy and social citizenship, and of selected policy outcomes, and represents a timely and inspiring contribution to an understanding of how the present-day American and European societies are developing."--Stein Kuhnle, Professor of Comparative Politics, University of Bergen and Professor of Comparative Social Policy, Hertie School of Governance "Unity in Diversity'is both successor and 21st century antithesis to Werner Sombart's 1906Why is There No Socialism in the United States?, which called attention to the lack of a major American socialist movement and challenged generations of social scientists to compare political and social well-being in the United States and Europe. The chapters collected here compare contemporary democracy, electoral participation, public expenditure patterns, poverty, employment, social mobility, educational opportunity, and immigration, finding at least as much similarity as difference. Alber and Gilbert conclude-at the start of a global economic crisis-the two sides of the Atlantic may now well be united by common goals, achieved to different degrees by marginally different means."--Stephan Leibfried, Professor of Public and Social Policy, University of Bremen
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Since the advent of the European Union, politicians have increasingly emphasized the notion of a European social model as an alternative to the American form of market capitalism, which is seen as promoting economic growth without regard for solidarity and social progress. As this political discourse has advanced, social scientists and academic policy analysts have raised questions concerning the extent to which the E.U. and U.S. social models exist outside the minds of diplomats and politicians seeking to stitch together a common identity. How much unity is there still within Europe after the Eastern enlargements have considerably increased economic and cultural diversity? To whatever extent one might discern a distinct set of commonalities that represent the core of a European approach, how different are the European characteristics of social, economic, and political life from those of America? Addressing these issues, this book systematically analyzes how much European countries and the United States have in common and how much variation we find within the enlarged European Union in eight central spheres of socio-economic and political life: employment, equality/mobility, educational opportunity, integration of immigrants, democratic functioning, political participation, rights to welfare, and levels of public spending. Drawing on empirical analyses by U.S. and European scholars who represent multi-disciplinary backgrounds, each of these topics is put under scrutiny. The results of this study illuminate points of convergence and divergence as seen from the perspectives of scholars from both sides of the Atlantic.
Main Description
Since the advent of the European Union, politicians have increasingly emphasized the notion of a European social model as an alternative to the American form of market capitalism, which is seen as promoting economic growth without regard for solidarity and social progress. As this politicaldiscourse has advanced, social scientists and academic policy analysts have raised questions concerning the extent to which the E.U. and U.S. social models exist outside the minds of diplomats and politicians seeking to stitch together a common identity. How much unity is there still within Europeafter the Eastern enlargements have considerably increased economic and cultural diversity? To whatever extent one might discern a distinct set of commonalities that represent the core of a European approach, how different are the European characteristics of social, economic, and political life fromthose of America?Addressing these issues, this book systematically analyzes how much European countries and the United States have in common and how much variation we find within the enlarged European Union in eight central spheres of socio-economic and political life: employment, equality/mobility, educationalopportunity, integration of immigrants, democratic functioning, political participation, rights to welfare, and levels of public spending. Drawing on empirical analyses by U.S. and European scholars who represent multi-disciplinary backgrounds, each of these topics is put under scrutiny. The resultsof this study illuminate points of convergence and divergence as seen from the perspectives of scholars from both sides of the Atlantic.
Table of Contents
Introduction
State: Structure and Policy
Democratic Functioning
Democratic Quality in America and Europe
Liberalism and Democracy in America Today
Political Integration
The Inequality of Electoral Participation in Europe and America and the Politically Integrative Functions of the Welfare State
Income Inequality and Participation in United States Elections
Patterns of Public Expenditure
Patterns of State Expenditure in Europe and America
Comparative Analyses of Stateness and State Action: What Can We Learn From Patterns of Expenditure?
Citizenship and Welfare
Concepts and Practices of Social Citizenship in Europe: The Case of Poverty and Income Support for the Poor
The New American Model of Work-Conditioned Public Support
Society: Conditions and Outcomes
The Goal of Full Employment
Welfare and Employment: a European Dilemma?
Fulfilling the Ballyhoo of a Peak Economy? The US Economic Model
Inequality and Mobility
Egalitarianism versus Economic Dynamics? An Empirical Assessment of the Friedman Conjecture
Are United States Inequality and Mobility Trends in the European Union's Future?
Educational Opportunity
Education in Europe and the Lisbon Benchmarks
The U.S. Educational System: Can it be a Model for Europe?
Immigrant Integration
Different Countries, Different Groups, Same Mechanisms? The Structural Assimilation of the Second Generation in Europe (D, F, GB) and the U.S.
Immigration and Nativism in the United States and Europe: Demography and Globalization versus the Nation-State
Conclusion
The Epistemology of Comparative Analyses: What Do We Know?
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem