Catalogue


Enduring words : literary narrative in a changing media ecology /
Michael Wutz.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2009.
description
ix, 279 p.
ISBN
0817316701 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780817316709 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2009.
isbn
0817316701 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780817316709 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Frank Norris and the new media ecology -- The pit: locating modernism's other -- Archaic mechanics, anarchic meaning: Malcolm Lowry and the technology of narrative -- License to shoot (and live): Malcolm Lowry and the captivity of cinema -- Narrative and information culture: garbage, waste, and residue in E. L. Doctorow -- The waterworks: knowledge and cognition in the early age of data storage -- By way of conclusion: City of God, Galatea 2.2, and the case of no body in vain.
catalogue key
6947622
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-08-01:
Having coedited (with Joseph Tabbi) Reading Matters: Narrative in the New Media Ecology (1997) and cotranslated (with Geoffrey Winthrop-Young) Friedrich Kittler's Gramophone, Film, Typewriter (CH, Nov'99, 37-1358), Wutz (Weber State Univ.) has already established his reputation in the study of literary narrative and its ongoing relationship with media and technology. This is his first solo volume, and he arranges it in eight chapters--an introductory overview followed by analysis of the impact of new technologies (typewriter, computer, phonograph, film) and digital information culture on human cognition and literary narrative as they are explored in the works of Frank Norris, Malcolm Lowry, E. L. Doctorow, and Richard Powers. Though the book begins well, Wutz's overall argument that print literary narrative has an assured and ongoing place among evolving media is less convincing than are his revelations about the impact of quickly changing media and technologies on the authors and narratives in question. Of particular interest is the author's ambitious attempt to position literary narrative as a useful, lasting reflection on concurrent science and philosophy concerning the nature, purposes, and aims of human consciousness. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. C. E. O'Neill New Mexico State University at Carlsbad
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Michael Wutz seeks to recuperate the
"For those skeptical, despairing, or m
"For those skeptical, despairing, or merely curious about the novelrs"s survival in the age of multimedia comes the welcome news ofEnduring Words. With expert precision, Michael Wutz explains how the novel flourished and became even more insistently itself by assimilating techniques developed by revolutionary aural, visual, and digital technologies-the phonograph, the photograph, the silent, the talking, the color, and the animated film, the computer-without abandoning its own print culture.Enduring Wordsis a must read in every sense." -Maria DiBattista, author ofImagining Virginia WoolfandFast-Talking Dames
"For those skeptical, despairing, or merely curious about the novelrs"s survival in the age of multimedia comes the welcome news ofEnduring Words. With expert precision, Michael Wutz explains how the novel flourished and became even more insistently itself by assimilating techniques developed by revolutionary aural, visual, and digital technologies-the phonograph, the photograph, the silent, the talking, the color, and the animated film, the computer-without abandoning its own print culture.Enduring Wordsis a must read in every sense." -Maria DiBattista, professor at Princeton University and author ofImagining Virginia WoolfandFast-Talking Dames
"For those skeptical, despairing, or merely curious about the novel's survival in the age of multimedia comes the welcome news of Enduring Words. With expert precision, Michael Wutz explains how the novel flourished and became even more insistently itself by assimilating techniques developed by revolutionary aural, visual, and digital technologies--the phonograph, the photograph, the silent, the talking, the color, and the animated film, the computer--without abandoning its own print culture. Enduring Wordsis a must read in every sense." --Maria DiBattista, professor at Princeton University and author of Imagining Virginia Woolfand Fast-Talking Dames
"Michael Wutz seeks to recuperate the literary novel in a post-print world by enhancing our sense of its place--the complexity as well as the security of its niche--within the digitally expanded ‘media ecology.' He unfolds a fine-grained historical analysis into photographic, phonographic, cinematic, computational, and digital components. Dwelling on the relays by which these technologies have inscribed themselves on literary texts, Enduring Wordsmakes a number of surprising and illuminating connections." --Bruce Clarke, professor at Texas Tech and author of Posthuman Metamorphosis: Narrative and Systems
"Wutz's crisp yet witty and entertaining prose and his original arguments and analysis foreground much that will not fail to command scholarly attention across numerous disciplines tangentially affiliated with media. "--Modern Fiction Studies
"Michael Wutz seeks to recuperate the literary novel in a postprint world by enhancing our sense of its place-the complexity as well as the security of its niche-within the digitally expanded 'media ecology.' He unfolds a fine-grained historical analysis into photographic, phonographic, cinematic, computational, and digital components. Dwelling on the relays by which these technologies have inscribed themselves on literary texts,Enduring Wordsmakes a number of surprising and illuminating connections."-Bruce Clarke, professor at Texas Tech and author ofPosthuman Metamorphosis: Narrative and Systems
"Michael Wutz seeks to recuperate the literary novel in a postprint world by enhancing our sense of its place-the complexity as well as the security of its niche-within the digitally expanded 'media ecology.' He unfolds a fine-grained historical analysis into photographic, phonographic, cinematic, computational, and digital components. Dwelling on the relays by which these technologies have inscribed themselves on literary texts,Enduring Wordsmakes a number of surprising and illuminating connections."-Bruce Clarke, author ofPosthuman Metamorphosis: Narrative and Systems
"Enduring Wordsis an extraordinary assessment of print culture and its offspring, the modern novel. It navigates the history of technology, the history of the modern subject, biopolitics, the history of science, and the cognitive sciences. For Wutz, fictional narrative offers the 'best possible model' for what will emerge as a truly electronic art form. His is a much more sophisticated and optimistic take on literature's role in our electronic future, one that opens up new avenues for future research in both literary and media studies."-Klaus Benesch, professor at the University of Munich and author ofRomantic Cyborgs: Authorship and Technology in the American Renaissance
" Enduring Wordsis an extraordinary assessment of print culture and its offspring, the modern novel. It navigates the history of technology, the history of the modern subject, biopolitics, the history of science, and the cognitive sciences. For Wutz, fictional narrative offers the ‘best possible model' for what will emerge as a truly electronic art form. His is a much more sophisticated and optimistic take on literature's role in our electronic future, one that opens up new avenues for future research in both literary and media studies." --Klaus Benesch, professor at the University of Munich and author of Romantic Cyborgs: Authorship and Technology in the American Renaissance
"Enduring Wordsis
"Enduring Wordsis an extraordinary assessment of print culture and its offspring, the modern novel. It navigates the history of technology, the history of the modern subject, biopolitics, the history of science, and the cognitive sciences. For Wutz, fictional narrative offers the 'best possible model' for what will emerge as a truly electronic art form. His is a much more sophisticated and optimistic take on literature's role in our electronic future, one that opens up new avenues for future research in both literary and media studies."-Klaus Benesch, author ofRomantic Cyborgs: Authorship and Technology in the American Renaissance
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Winner of the 2010 Susanne K. Langer Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Symbolic Form, sponsored by the Media Ecology Association. An interdisciplinary study of the condition of narrative fiction in the age of its supposed obsolescence.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Mediating Narrativep. 1
Unusual Suspects, Unusual Subjectsp. 6
Narrative Niches in a Postprint Worldp. 20
Frank Norris and the Modern Media Ecologyp. 28
Zoning the District: Photography, "Chromoliterature," and Literary Naturalismp. 29
Relegitimizing Print: Cinema, the Body, and the Big Stinkp. 37
Agency and Angst: Mangled Hands and Machined Writingp. 46
The Pit: Locating Modernism's Otherp. 55
Blending the Wheat with the Chaffp. 56
Art and Dandies in the Cornbeltp. 62
Of Cablegrams and First Editions, or Short Circuits of the Wired Mindp. 74
Archaic Mechanics, Anarchic Meaning: Malcolm Lowry and the Technology of Narrativep. 85
The Engineer, the Hand, and the Machinep. 87
Narrative Technology: The Myth and the Machinep. 98
The Narrative Engine as Difference Enginep. 103
License to Shoot (and Live): Malcolm Lowry and the Captivity of Cinemap. 107
Inside "the Cabinet of Dr. Caliglowry"p. 109
Trains, Planes, and Automobiles: The Cinematic Real in Tender Is the Nightp. 115
Incarceration and Imaginary Liberation in October Ferry to Gabriolap. 123
Literary Narrative and Information Culture: Garbage, Waste, and Residue in the Work of E. L. Doctorowp. 133
The Stuff Novels Are Made On, or the Artist in Stitchesp. 134
Literary Recycling, Postmodernism, and the Novel Nomadp. 141
Half-Life, Shelf-Life, and Literary Fallout, or Waste Making Noisep. 151
The Waterworks: Knowledge and Cognition in the Early Age of Data Storagep. 156
Stars at War, or Data in Gothamp. 157
Brains, Waves, and Recording Machinesp. 164
Modularity, Information, Narrative Knowledgep. 173
By Way of Conclusion: City of God, Galatea 2.2, and the Case of No Body in Vainp. 181
Cognition in Circuit City, or City of Circuitsp. 181
Language and (Narrative) Cognition in Galatea 2.2p. 189
Posthuman Embodiment, Writing, and Printp. 196
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 247
Indexp. 271
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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