Catalogue


Rethinking governance : the centrality of the state in modern society /
Stephen Bell and Andrew Hindmoor.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
xv, 234 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521712831 (pbk.), 9780521712835 (hardback), 9780521712835 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
0521712831 (pbk.)
9780521712835 (hardback)
9780521712835 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6947293
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 194-221) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Stephen Bell is Professor and former Heed of the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. Andrew Hindmoor is Senior Lecturer in the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Well written and well executed, this book makes a persuasive case that the state remains a central actor in contemporary governing even while modes of governing themselves have evolved - an important corrective to claims of 'governance without government ...' Grace Skogstad, University of Toronto
'Well written and well executed, this book makes a persuasive case that the state remains a central actor in contemporary governing even while modes of governing themselves have evolved - an important corrective to claims of 'governance without government ...' Professor Grace Skogstad, University of Toronto
'Stephen Bell and Andrew Hindmoor have produced an exemplary scholarly study, which is meticulous, spirited and lucid … This excellent work deserves wide attention and influence. In future debates concerning the formal apparatus of the state, it should be the basic reference.' Ian Marsh, The Australian Journal of Political Science
'... voluminous coverage of the relevant literature, sophisticated handling of a range of theoretical perspectives and empirical demonstrations from a range of countries and settings ... students of governance, from those introducing themselves to the topic to seasoned researchers, will find much of value in this book.' Gerry Stoker, University of Southampton
' ... voluminous coverage of the relevant literature, sophisticated handling of a range of theoretical perspectives and empirical demonstrations from a range of countries and settings ... students of governance, from those introducing themselves to the topic to seasoned researchers, will find much of value in this book.' Professor Gerry Stoker, University of Southampton
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Several problems plague contemporary thinking about governance, from the multiple definitions that are often vague and confusing, to the assumption that governance strategies such as networks and markets represent attempts by Weakening states to maintain control. Rethinking Governance questions these assumptions and seeks to clarify how we understand governance. Arguing that it is best understood as 'the strategies used by governments to help govern', the authors counter the view that governments have been decentred. They show that far from receding, states are in fact enhancing their capacity to govern by exerting top-down controls and developing closer ties with non-government sectors. Identifying several 'modes' of governance, Stephen Bell and Andrew Hindmoor use a wide range of practical examples to explore the strengths and limitations of each. In so doing, they demonstrate how modern states are using a mixture of governance modes to address specific policy problems. This book demonstrates why the argument that states are being 'hollowed out' is overblown. Rethinking Governance refocuses our attention on the central role played by governments in devising governance strategies. Book jacket.
Main Description
Several problems plague contemporary thinking about governance. From the multiple definitions that are often vague and confusing, to the assumption that governance strategies, networks and markets represent attempts by weakening states to maintain control. Rethinking Governance questions this view and seeks to clarify how we understand governance. Arguing that it is best understood as 'the strategies used by governments to help govern', the authors counter the view that governments have been decentred. They show that far from receding, states are in fact enhancing their capacity to govern by developing closer ties with non-government sectors. Identifying five 'modes' of government (governance through hierarchy, persuasion, markets and contracts, community engagement, and network associations), Stephen Bell and Andrew Hindmoor use practical examples to explore the strengths and limitations of each. In so doing, they demonstrate how modern states are using a mixture of governance modes to address specific policy problems. This book demonstrates why the argument that states are being 'hollowed out' is overblown. Rethinking Governance refocuses our attention on the central role played by governments in devising governance strategies.
Description for Bookstore
This book seeks to make key developments in political science relevant to discussions about governance. The authors argue that insights drawn from political science research in areas such as state capacity, policy networks, new institutionalism and the role of ideas in politics can enrich contemporary understanding of governance.
Main Description
It is often assumed governance strategies are attempts by weakening state to rules by other means; such as networks or markets. This book questions this view and argues that governance is best understood as the strategies used by governments to help govern. Bell and Hindmoor argue that governments typically use four different modes of governance: via the use of markets, contracts, partnerships, and inculcating modes of 'self discipline' or 'compliance' in target subjects. The authors use a range of case studies to illustrate the dynamics of these differing modes of governance. This book seeks to make key developments in political science relevant to discussions about governance. The authors argue that insights drawn from political science research in areas such as state capacity, policy networks, new institutionalism and the role of ideas in politics can enrich contemporary understanding of governance.
Table of Contents
List of figures and tablesp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
A state-centric relational approachp. 1
Society-centred governancep. 3
A fundamental transformation?p. 6
A State-centric relational approachp. 10
Modes of governancep. 16
Conclusionp. 18
The resilient statep. 20
Public choice theory and state failurep. 21
Government overload and the fiscal crisis of the statep. 23
The implementation gap?p. 27
A crisis in legitimacy?p. 29
The decentring of governmentp. 32
Globalisationp. 39
Conclusionp. 44
Metagovernance and state capacityp. 46
The functions of metagovernancep. 47
Metagovernance as a problem of public good provisionp. 55
State capacity: a state-centric relational accountp. 59
The challenges of metagovernancep. 66
Conclusionp. 69
Hierarchy and top-down governancep. 71
Rolling back the state?p. 72
Hierarchical governance: challenges and adaptationsp. 85
Self-regulation in the shadow of hierarchyp. 89
The growing volume of governancep. 92
Conclusionp. 95
Governance through persuasionp. 97
Legitimacy, persuasion and governance without governmentp. 99
The metagovernance of persuasionp. 105
Persuading statesp. 106
Combining modes of governance: persuasion and hierarchyp. 108
Social capital and governance through persuasionp. 109
Conclusionp. 113
Governance through markets and contractsp. 115
The marketisation of governancep. 116
State capacity and marketsp. 120
The resilience of hierarchyp. 121
The metagovernance of markets: markets through hierarchyp. 123
Policy learning and metagovernancep. 126
Relational capacityp. 129
Governance through business?p. 131
Conclusionp. 135
Governance through community engagementp. 137
Citizen and community engagementp. 139
The foundations of community engagementp. 144
Willing and capable citizens and communities?p. 146
Accountability and legitimacyp. 149
A willing and able state?p. 151
Power-sharing and the statep. 155
Do-it-yourself community engagementp. 158
Conclusionp. 160
Governance through associationsp. 162
Forms of associative governancep. 164
Private-interest governmentp. 169
The role of the state within associative governancep. 174
Governance without government?p. 181
Conclusionp. 184
Conclusionp. 186
Notesp. 192
Bibliographyp. 194
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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