Catalogue


Masterpiece comics /
by R. Sikoryak.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Montréal : Drawn and Quarterly, 2009.
description
65 p. : chiefly col. ill. ; 31 cm.
ISBN
1897299842 (hdc.), 9781897299845 (hdc.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
author
imprint
Montréal : Drawn and Quarterly, 2009.
isbn
1897299842 (hdc.)
9781897299845 (hdc.)
contents note
Classics on parade: Blonde Eve, Inferno Joe, Mephistofield, Mac Worth, and Candiggy -- The Crypt of Bronte: The house-keeper in The heights and The depths -- Hester's little pearl: Little Pearl in, Red letter days -- Dostoyevsky comics: Raskol in, Crime and punishment -- Masterful funnies: Little Dori in pictureland, Good ol' Gregor Brown, Action Camus, and Waiting to go -- Plus: Masterpiece queries.
catalogue key
6947208
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2009-07-20:
This slim but densely sly volume collects, at long last, 20 years of Sikoryak's classic lit/classic comics mashups. Blondie and Dagwood act out Genesis in "Blonde Eve"; Garfield tempts Jon into a deal with the devil in "Mephistofield"; and Batman turns into Raskol for a reworking of "Crime and Punishment." What could be simple parody in other hands is elevated to multileveled artistry by Sikoryak's uncanny ability to mimic the line of artists from Winsor McCay through Jack Davis to Charles Schulz. He goes far beyond mere imitation to eerily inhabit the artistic sensibilities of a dozen cartoonists; the result is as funny as it is impressive. These retellings linger on the philosophical underpinnings of such tales; coupled with the allusions and baggage of these familiar cartoon characters, the crossovers take on a life of their own to become legitimate adaptations. For instance, Little Pearl in "Red Letter Day" features Marjorie Henderson Buell/John Stanley's Little Lulu characters in a note for note retelling of Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, contrasting the grim Puritan narrative with the animated expressions of the Bueel/Stanley originals to cast the sin-obsessed settlers into even sharper relief. Readers who pick this up for the well-deserved laughter will get a bonus with the thoughtful metaphors. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A provocative collision." Entertainment Weekly "A brilliant parable about literature,history and what telling stories tells us about ourselves." Toronto Star "Disconcerting and fascinating . . . A canny fusion of overlapping fictional legacies." The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
"A provocative collision."Entertainment Weekly "A brilliant parable about literature,history and what telling stories tells us about ourselves."Toronto Star "Disconcerting and fascinating . . . A canny fusion of overlapping fictional legacies."The Globe and Mail(Toronto)
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, July 2009
Booklist, September 2009
Globe & Mail, September 2009
Los Angeles Times, December 2009
School Library Journal, January 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
HILARIOUS PARODIES OF CLASSIC LITERATURE REIMAGINED WITH CLASSIC COMICS Masterpiece Comicsadapts a variety of classic literary works with the most iconic visual idioms of twentieth-century comics. Dense with exclamation marks and lurid zip-a-tone, R. Sikoryak's parodies remind us of the sensational excesses of the canon, or, if you prefer, of the economical expressiveness of classic comics fromSupermantoPeanuts. In Blond Eve," Dagwood and Blondie are ejected from the Garden of Eden into their archetypal suburban home;OscarWilde's Dorian Gray is reimagined as a foppish Winsor McCay character; and Camus's Stranger becomes a brooding, chain-smoking Golden Age Superman. Other source material includes Dante, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, bubblegum wrappers, superhero comics, cat cartoons, and more. Sikoryak's classics have appeared in landmark anthologies such asRAWandDrawn & Quarterly, all of which are collected inMasterpiece Comics, along with brilliant new graphic literary satires.He is an illustrator forThe New Yorkerand
Main Description
HILARIOUS PARODIES OF CLASSIC LITERATURE REIMAGINED WITH CLASSIC COMICS Masterpiece Comics adapts a variety of classic literary works with the most iconic visual idioms of twentieth-century comics. Dense with exclamation marks and lurid colors, R. Sikoryak's parodies remind us of the sensational excesses of the canon, or, if you prefer, of the economical expressiveness of classic comics from Batman to Garfield. In "Blond Eve,? Dagwood and Blondie are ejected from the Garden of Eden into their archetypal suburban home; Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray is reimagined as a foppish Little Nemo; and Camus's Stranger becomes a brooding, chain-smoking Golden Age Superman. Other source material includes Dante, Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, bubblegum wrappers, superhero comics, kid cartoons, and more. Sikoryak's classics have appeared in landmark anthologies such as RAW and Drawn & Quarterly, all of which are collected in Masterpiece Comics, along with brilliant new graphic literary satires. His drawings have appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, as well as in The New Yorker, The Onion, Mad, and Nickelodeon Magazine.
Main Description
"A brilliant parable about literature, history and what telling stories tells us about ourselves." (Toronto Star)"A provocative collision." (Entertainment Weekly)"Disconcerting and fascinating... a canny fusion of overlapping fictional legacies." (Globe and Mail)Masterpiece Comics adapts a variety of classic literary works with the most iconic visual idioms of twentieth-century comics. Dense with exclamation marks and lurid zip-a-tone, R. Sikoryak's parodies remind us of the sensational excesses of the canon, or, if you prefer, of the economical expressiveness of classic comics from Superman to Peanuts. In "Blond Eve," Dagwood and Blondie are ejected from the Garden of Eden into their archetypal suburban home; Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray is re-imagined as a foppish Winsor McCay character; and Camus' Stranger as a brooding, chain-smoking Golden Era Superman.Recommended age level: 16+
Main Description
HILARIOUS PARODIES OF CLASSIC LITERATURE REIMAGINED WITH CLASSIC COMICS Masterpiece Comics adapts a variety of classic literary works with the most iconic visual idioms of twentieth-century comics. Dense with exclamation marks and lurid colors, R. Sikoryak's parodies remind us of the sensational excesses of the canon, or, if you prefer, of the economical expressiveness of classic comics from Batman to Garfield . In "Blond Eve," Dagwood and Blondie are ejected from the Garden of Eden into their archetypal suburban home; Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray is reimagined as a foppish Little Nemo; and Camus's Stranger becomes a brooding, chain-smoking Golden Age Superman. Other source material includes Dante, Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, bubblegum wrappers, superhero comics, kid cartoons, and more. Sikoryak's classics have appeared in landmark anthologies such as RAW and Drawn & Quarterly , all of which are collected in Masterpiece Comics , along with brilliant new graphic literary satires. His drawings have appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, as well as in The New Yorker, The Onion, Mad, and Nickelodeon Magazine.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Masterpiece Comics' adapts a variety of classic literary works with the most iconic visual idioms of 20th-century comics. Dense with exclamation marks & lurid zip-a-tone, Sikoryak's parodies remind us of the sensational excesses of the canon, or if you prefer, of the economical expressiveness of classic comics from Superman to Peanuts.

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