Catalogue


Broken lines : genealogical literature in late-medieval Britain and France /
edited by Raluca L. Radulescu and Edward Donald Kennedy.
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, 2008.
description
xiv, 295 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
2503524850 (hbk.), 9782503524856 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, 2008.
isbn
2503524850 (hbk.)
9782503524856 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6946550
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2009
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The essays in this collection explore the genealogical literature of late-medieval Britain and France in relation to issues of identity, the transmission of power, and cultural, socio-political and economic developments. They give the reader a complex understanding of genealogical literature and its relationships with other genres.
Long Description
The essays in this important and fascinating collection explore the genealogical literature of late-medieval Britain and France in relation to issues of identity, the transmission of power, and cultural, socio-political, and economic developments. By analyzing the mechanics of cultural and political inheritance and the processes of shaping a sense of identity and descent, the essays in this volume direct the reader towards a complex understanding of genealogical literature and its relationships with other genres, one which will further debate and research in these areas. The present collection presents an interdisciplinary approach to the genealogical literature of the late-medieval period, and brings together specialists in the fields of history, cultural history and literature to raise questions of gender, genre, and theoretical approaches. Broken Lines is also the first book-length study of genealogical literature to date, an exciting intervention into this emerging field of interest.
Long Description
The essays in this important and fascinating collection explore the genealogical literature of medieval Britain and France in relation to issues of identity, the transmission of power, and cultural, socio-political, and economic developments. By analyzing the mechanics of cultural and political inheritance and the processes of shaping a sense of identity and descent, the essays in this volume direct the reader towards a complex understanding of genealogical literature and its relationships with other genres, one which will further debate and research in these areas. The present collection presents an interdisciplinary approach to the genealogical literature of the late-medieval period, and brings together specialists in the fields of history, cultural history and literature to raise questions of gender, genre, and theoretical approaches.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Contributorsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Genealogy in Insular Romancep. 7
Prophecy, Genealogy, and History in Medieval English Political Discoursep. 27
A New Pattern for English History: The First Genealogical Rolls of the Kings of Englandp. 45
Genealogies of Noble Families in Anglo-Normanp. 63
Genealogies in Medieval Francep. 79
Genealogy in Monastic Chronicles in Englandp. 103
Genealogy Rewritten: Inheriting the Legendary in Insular Historiographyp. 123
Genealogy and Gentility: Social Status in Provincial Englandp. 143
The Antiquity of Scottish Civilization: King-lists and Genealogical Chroniclesp. 159
Genealogical Narratives and Kingship in Medieval Walesp. 175
Case Studies
Narrative, Lineage, and Succession in the Anglo-Norman Prose Brut Chroniclep. 205
Genealogy and Women in the Prose Brut, Especially the Middle English Common Version and its Continuationsp. 221
Genealogy and John Hardyng's Verse Chroniclep. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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