Catalogue


Framing the Iraq War endgame : war's denouement in an age of terror /
Erika G. King, Robert A. Wells.
imprint
New York : Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009.
description
278 p.
ISBN
0230608981 (alk. paper), 9780230608986 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230608981 (alk. paper)
9780230608986 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6941407
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Erika G. King is Professor of Political Science at Grand Valley State University. She previously served as Chair of the department of Political Science and Dean of Social Sciences at Grand Valley. Prior to that, she was Professor of Political Science and Associate Dean of the Faculty at Chatham University. Her teaching and research specializations are mass media and politics and she has published in a variety of scholarly journals. Robert A. Wells is Professor and Chair of Political Science at Thiel College. He previously taught at Chatham University. His teaching and research specializations are international relations, American foreign policy, and mass media and politics. He has published in a variety of scholarly journals.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"George W. Bush, the longest-serving wartime commander in chief in U.S. history, fought a remarkable rhetorical war after 9/11. InFraming the Iraq War Endgame, Erika King and Robert Wells analyze the administration's controversial discourse over Iraq. Their insights reveal much about the way Americans deliberate over global conflicts, foreign policy, the presidency, and ultimately our values as a people. This study deserves a prominent place on bookshelves inside and outside the Beltway."--Gleaves Whitney, Director, Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies Grand Valley State University "This is a timely and significant work on the paradoxes of defining terrorism as a military problem. Unlike many of America's past conflicts, the Iraq War has been framed within a set of ideological narratives surrounding sub-national conflict. King and Wells identify the nature of these narratives and thoroughly examine their impact on competing policy positions. The Iraqi conflict developed within the context of a nebulous, controversial political position--a belief that the United States could declare war on a concept: terrorism. This book explicates the complexities of victory and defeat in a shadow war. Few have defined the problem so well."--Jonathan R. White, author ofTerrorism and Homeland Security
"George W. Bush, the longest-serving wartime commander in chief in U.S. history, fought a remarkable rhetorical war after 9/11. In Framing the Iraq War Endgame , Erika King and Robert Wells analyze the administration's controversial discourse over Iraq. Their insights reveal much about the way Americans deliberate over global conflicts, foreign policy, the presidency, and ultimately our values as a people. This study deserves a prominent place on bookshelves inside and outside the Beltway."--Gleaves Whitney, Director, Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies Grand Valley State University "This is a timely and significant work on the paradoxes of defining terrorism as a military problem. Unlike many of America's past conflicts, the Iraq War has been framed within a set of ideological narratives surrounding sub-national conflict. King and Wells identify the nature of these narratives and thoroughly examine their impact on competing policy positions. The Iraqi conflict developed within the context of a nebulous, controversial political position--a belief that the United States could declare war on a concept: terrorism. This book explicates the complexities of victory and defeat in a shadow war. Few have defined the problem so well."--Jonathan R. White, author of Terrorism and Homeland Security
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Summaries
Main Description
The Bush administration was remarkably successful in dominating the debate over why we had to go to war with Iraq, but it would soon be faced with the more daunting task of winning the monumental rhetorical struggle over how to write the script of the Iraq War endgame. We examine the twists and turns of the discursive battle over the war's denouement as it played out against the backdrop of the war on terror, and we conclude that while Bush failed to win the argument that Iraq was one with our fight against terrorism, his underlying worldview that we must confront terrorist evil through global military engagement remains an important component of Obama adminstration rhetoric.
Long Description
This book traces the evolution of political and media discourse on the Iraq war endgame over the roughly 28-month period from late fall 2005 to spring 2008. Using the conceptualization of a 'frame contest' (a struggle between competing explanatory narratives or interpretations of an event), the authors analyze analyze the congressional challenges that began in November 2005 to the heretofore dominant Bush frame of military triumph over terrorism; Bush's and his congressional allies' rhetorical responses to those challenges; and the resultant struggle for narrative dominance in portraying the meaning and outcome of the war. To date no one has undertaken the task to analyze the titanic clash over how to interpret the final chapter of the military conflict that is the major political battlefield of the first decade of the 21st century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text traces the evolution of political and media discourse on the Iraq war endgame between late 2005 and early 2008. The authors analyse a number of topics including the congressional challenges of November 2005 to the previously dominant Bush frame of military triumph over terrorism.
Description for Bookstore
This book traces the evolution of political and media discourse on the Iraq war endgame over the roughly 28-month period from late fall 2005 to spring 2008.
Description for Bookstore
Undertakes the task of analyzing how to interpret the final chapter of the Iraq conflict - the major political battlefield of the first decade of the 21st century
Long Description
This book traces the evolution of political and media discourse on the Iraq war endgame over the roughly 28-month period from late fall 2005 to spring 2008. Using the conceptualization of a 'œframe contest' (a struggle between competing explanatory narratives or interpretations of an event), the authors analyze analyze the congressional challenges that began in November 2005 to the heretofore dominant Bush frame of military triumph over terrorism; Bush's and his congressional allies' rhetorical responses to those challenges; and the resultant struggle for narrative dominance in portraying the meaning and outcome of the war. To date no one has undertaken the task to analyze the titanic clash over how to interpret the final chapter of the military conflict that is the major political battlefield of the first decade of the 21st century.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Constructing the Endgame Narrative for a Different Kind of Warp. 1
Dominating the Discourse of Terrorp. 25
Fighting the Central Front in the War on Terrorp. 49
Recasting Iraq as War on Terrorp. 77
Challenging the Iraq Victory Narrativep. 101
Confronting Chaos in Iraqp. 125
Changing America's Course in Iraqp. 157
Envisioning War's Denouementp. 189
Notesp. 217
Referencesp. 237
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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