Catalogue


Zamumo's gifts : Indian-European exchange in the colonial Southeast /
Joseph M. Hall, Jr.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.
description
x, 232 p.
ISBN
0812241797 (alk. paper), 9780812241792 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.
isbn
0812241797 (alk. paper)
9780812241792 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6941396
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-06-01:
Hall (Bates College) illustrates how indigenous patterns of gift giving and exchange "helped to fashion the fabric of empires" in the Colonial Southeast. He begins with an apt description of post-Cahokia Mississippian commerce and exchanges and the continued use of gifting, exchange, and tribute with the arrival of the Spanish during the 16th century. Hall argues that though the Spaniards' arrival was disastrous for many towns, the presence of Spanish goods allowed others to manipulate the existing Native power relationships, build alliances, and wrangle more autonomy from dominant Native groups. The Spanish arrival added "a new and powerful people to old networks of power." Commercial networks adapted once again with the English arrival in the region and the concomitant emergence of the Indian slave trade. Albeit altered, traditional patterns of exchange endured the upheaval unleashed by the new geopolitics after 1659 and the reorientation wrought by the Yamasee War. Hall's work emphasizes Native agency in the Colonial Southeast by highlighting how decisions made within Native towns, predicated on each town's security, contoured European behavior and affected imperial fortunes. Even in the 1720s, Hall concludes, "the rules of the region remained more Creek than Carolinian." Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. D. Bergmann Randolph-Macon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fascinating, well-researched, and extremely well-written volume that accomplishes a great deal. . . . This book will most certainly have immense and immediate impacts on historians, anthropologists, archaeologists, and others interested in the nature of exchange in the colonial Southeast."- American Historical Review
"An exemplary study."- Journal of American History
"Hall tells a complicated story with skill and insight. His exposition of the importance of the Mississippian world to the creation of the colonial world suggests that we ought to rethink what we mean by colonial."- American Indian Culture & Research Journal
" Zamumo's Giftsis a book with many gifts to bestow. Ranging widely across the centuries, going deeply into English, French, Spanish, and native sources, Joseph Hall reads the evidence with insight and imagination to shed important new light on America's 'dark ages,' a largely forgotten era when natives and newcomers contended for the Continent."-James Merrell, author of Into the American Woods
"Zamumo's Giftsis a book with many gifts to bestow. Ranging widely across the centuries, going deeply into English, French, Spanish, and native sources, Joseph Hall reads the evidence with insight and imagination to shed important new light on America's 'dark ages,' a largely forgotten era when natives and newcomers contended for the Continent."--James Merrell, author ofInto the American Woods
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In 1540, Zamumo, the chief of the Altamahas in central Georgia, exchanged gifts with the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto. With these gifts began two centuries of exchanges that bound American Indians and the Spanish, English, and French who colonized the region. Whether they gave gifts for diplomacy or traded commodities for profit, Natives and newcomers alike used the exchange of goods such as cloth, deerskin, muskets, and sometimes people as a way of securing their influence. Gifts and trade enabled early colonies to survive and later colonies to prosper. Conversely, they upset the social balance of chiefdoms like Zamumo's and promoted the rise of new and powerful Indian confederacies like the Creeks and the Choctaws. Drawing on archaeological studies, colonial documents from three empires, and Native oral histories, Joseph M. Hall, Jr., offers fresh insights into broad segments of southeastern colonial history, including the success of Florida's Franciscan missionaries before 1640 and the impact of the Indian slave trade on French Louisiana after 1699. He also shows how gifts and trade shaped the Yamasee War, which pitted a number of southeastern tribes against English South Carolina in 1715-17. The exchanges at the heart of Zamumo's Giftshighlight how the history of Europeans and Native Americans cannot be understood without each other.
Main Description
In 1540, Zamumo, the chief of the Altamahas in central Georgia, exchanged gifts with the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto. With these gifts began two centuries of exchanges that bound American Indians and the Spanish, English, and French who colonized the region. Whether they gave gifts for diplomacy or traded commodities for profit, Natives and newcomers alike used the exchange of goods such as cloth, deerskin, muskets, and sometimes people as a way of securing their influence. Gifts and trade enabled early colonies to survive and later colonies to prosper. Conversely, they upset the social balance of chiefdoms like Zamumo's and promoted the rise of new and powerful Indian confederacies like the Creeks and the Choctaws. Drawing on archaeological studies, colonial documents from three empires, and Native oral histories, Joseph M. Hall, Jr., offers fresh insights into broad segments of southeastern colonial history, including the success of Florida's Franciscan missionaries before 1640 and the impact of the Indian slave trade on French Louisiana after 1699. He also shows how gifts and trade shaped the Yamasee War, which pitted a number of southeastern tribes against English South Carolina in 1715-17. The exchanges at the heart ofZamumo's Giftshighlight how the history of the Indians and the history of the Europeans cannot be understood without each other.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
The Spirit of a Feather: The Politics of Mississippian Exchange
Floods and Feathers: From the Mississippian to the Floridian
Seeking the Atlantic: The Growth of Trade
Following the White Path: Migration and the Muskogees' Quest for Security
Creating White Hearts: Anxious Alliances amid the Slave Trade
The Yamasee War: Trade Reformed, a Region Reoriented
Cries of ''Euchee!'': Imperial Trade in a Creek Southeast
Conclusion: Gifts and Trade, Towns and Empires
Notes
Glossary of Native Place Names
Index
Acknowledgments
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem