Catalogue


Virginia Woolf and the Russian point of view /
Roberta Rubenstein.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xi, 265 p.
ISBN
0230618731 (alk. paper), 9780230618732 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230618731 (alk. paper)
9780230618732 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6937885
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Roberta Rubenstein is Professor of Literature at American University. She is the author of The Novelistic Vision of Doris Lessing: Breaking the Forms of Consciousness; Boundaries of the Self: Gender, Culture, Fiction; Home Matters: Longing and Belonging, Nostalgia and Mourning in Women's Fiction; Reminiscences of Leonard Woolf; and more than thirty essays and book chapters on modern and contemporary writers, including Virginia Woolf, Shirley Jackson, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, John Fowles, Margaret Drabble, Toni Morrison, Angela Carter, Barbara Kingsolver, Paul Auster, and Fay Weldon.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Rare are the scholarly studies that combine timeliness, impressive originality, and acutely precise and detailed analysis with a gently reassuring sense that we are not so much engaged in 'criticism' as being invited to read over a writer's shoulder and catch the very passions and wonder that they might have felt as they read. What a delight then to come at last upon Roberta Rubenstein's Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View ." - Woolf Studies Annual "Rubenstein's readings and the discussions are never other than subtle, perceptive, and persuasive." - Virginia Woolf Bulletin "A scrupulous and illuminating exploration of Virginia Woolf's long and deep engagement with early-twentieth-century 'Russophilia,' Rubenstein's new study examines the impact of such major figures as Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev on both Woolf's critical theory and her aesthetic practice. The book will be welcomed not only by Woolf scholars but, more generally, by students and theorists of modernism and narrative." - Sandra M. Gilbert, Distinguished Professor Emerita, University of California, Davis "In this much needed study of the 'imaginative residue of the Russian writers' in Virginia Woolf's thought and work, Rubenstein convincingly shows how reading and re-reading Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev at crucial times in her career affected Woolf's development and evolution as a modernist. Thorough consideration of cultural forces, close readings of numerous texts both British and Russian, and meticulous research inform this clearly written argument, and as a bonus, Rubenstein invites us into Woolf's workshop by providing well-footnoted transcriptions of all the available reading notes, drafts, and typescripts on the Russians in the archives. What a valuable contribution to Woolf studies!" - Beth Rigel Daugherty, Otterbein College and co-editor of Approaches to Teaching Woolf's To the Lighthouse " Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View is distinguished by its clarity, elegance of prose, lack of jargon, and careful analysis of possible Russian influence on Woolf's fiction. Readers also gain an introduction to individual Russian texts through Rubenstein's eyes as she trains her gaze on these texts as if looking over Woolf's shoulder." - Ruth O. Saxton, Professor of English, Mills College
"A scrupulous and illuminating exploration of Virginia Woolf's long and deep engagement with early-twentieth-century 'Russophilia,' Rubenstein's new study examines the impact of such major figures as Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev on both Woolf's critical theory and her aesthetic practice. The book will be welcomed not only by Woolf scholars but, more generally, by students and theorists of modernism and narrative."Sandra M. Gilbert, Distinguished Professor Emerita, University of California, Davis"In this much needed study of the 'imaginative residue of the Russian writers' in Virginia Woolf's thought and work, Rubenstein convincingly shows how reading and re-reading Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev at crucial times in her career affected Woolf's development and evolution as a modernist. Thorough consideration of cultural forces, close readings of numerous texts both British and Russian, and meticulous research inform this clearly written argument, and as a bonus, Rubenstein invites us into Woolf's workshop by providing well-footnoted transcriptions of all the available reading notes, drafts, and typescripts on the Russians in the archives. What a valuable contribution to Woolf studies!"Beth Rigel Daugherty, Otterbein College and co-editor ofApproaches to Teaching Woolf'sTo the Lighthouse"Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of Viewis distinguished by its clarity, elegance of prose, lack of jargon, and careful analysis of possible Russian influence on Woolf's fiction. Readers also gain an introduction to individual Russian texts through Rubenstein's eyes as she trains her gaze on these texts as if looking over Woolf's shoulder."--Ruth O. Saxton, Professor of English, Mills College
"Rubenstein's readings and the discussions are never other than subtle, perceptive, and persuasive." Virginia Woolf Bulletin "A scrupulous and illuminating exploration of Virginia Woolf's long and deep engagement with early-twentieth-century 'Russophilia,' Rubenstein's new study examines the impact of such major figures as Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev on both Woolf's critical theory and her aesthetic practice. The book will be welcomed not only by Woolf scholars but, more generally, by students and theorists of modernism and narrative."Sandra M. Gilbert, Distinguished Professor Emerita, University of California, Davis "In this much needed study of the 'imaginative residue of the Russian writers' in Virginia Woolf's thought and work, Rubenstein convincingly shows how reading and re-reading Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev at crucial times in her career affected Woolf's development and evolution as a modernist. Thorough consideration of cultural forces, close readings of numerous texts both British and Russian, and meticulous research inform this clearly written argument, and as a bonus, Rubenstein invites us into Woolf's workshop by providing well-footnoted transcriptions of all the available reading notes, drafts, and typescripts on the Russians in the archives. What a valuable contribution to Woolf studies!"Beth Rigel Daugherty, Otterbein College and co-editor of Approaches to Teaching Woolf's To the Lighthouse " Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View is distinguished by its clarity, elegance of prose, lack of jargon, and careful analysis of possible Russian influence on Woolf's fiction. Readers also gain an introduction to individual Russian texts through Rubenstein's eyes as she trains her gaze on these texts as if looking over Woolf's shoulder."--Ruth O. Saxton, Professor of English, Mills College
"A scrupulous and illuminating exploration of Virginia Woolf's long and deep engagement with early-twentieth-century 'Russophilia,' Rubenstein's new study examines the impact of such major figures as Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev on both Woolf's critical theory and her aesthetic practice. The book will be welcomed not only by Woolf scholars but, more generally, by students and theorists of modernism and narrative."Sandra M. Gilbert, Distinguished Professor Emerita, University of California, Davis "In this much needed study of the 'imaginative residue of the Russian writers' in Virginia Woolf's thought and work, Rubenstein convincingly shows how reading and re-reading Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Turgenev at crucial times in her career affected Woolf's development and evolution as a modernist. Thorough consideration of cultural forces, close readings of numerous texts both British and Russian, and meticulous research inform this clearly written argument, and as a bonus, Rubenstein invites us into Woolf's workshop by providing well-footnoted transcriptions of all the available reading notes, drafts, and typescripts on the Russians in the archives. What a valuable contribution to Woolf studies!"Beth Rigel Daugherty, Otterbein College and co-editor of Approaches to Teaching Woolf's To the Lighthouse " Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View is distinguished by its clarity, elegance of prose, lack of jargon, and careful analysis of possible Russian influence on Woolf's fiction. Readers also gain an introduction to individual Russian texts through Rubenstein's eyes as she trains her gaze on these texts as if looking over Woolf's shoulder."--Ruth O. Saxton, Professor of English, Mills College
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Summaries
Main Description
In 1919, Virginia Woolf wrote, "The most inconclusive remarks upon modern English fiction can hardly avoid some mention of the Russian influence, and if the Russians are mentioned one runs the risk of feeling that to write of any fiction save theirs is a waste of time." InVirginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View, Roberta Rubenstein examines Woolf's responses to Russian literature over two decades and across the range of her fiction, essays, and book reviews. She argues that the Russian writers significantly influenced Woolf's developing Modernist aesthetic and left lasting marks on her theory and practice of fiction. The book includes transcriptions of forty-eight pages of Woolf's previously unpublished reading notes on Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Turgenev, and an unpublished review in which Chekhov and the Russians figure centrally.
Main Description
In 1919, Virginia Woolf wrote, The most inconclusive remarks upon modern English fiction can hardly avoid some mention of the Russian influence, and if the Russians are mentioned one runs the risk of feeling that to write of any fiction save theirs is a waste of time. In Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View , Roberta Rubenstein examines Woolf's responses to Russian literature over two decades and across the range of her fiction, essays, and book reviews. She argues that the Russian writers significantly influenced Woolf's developing Modernist aesthetic and left lasting marks on her theory and practice of fiction. The book includes transcriptions of forty-eight pages of Woolf's previously unpublished reading notes on Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Turgenev, and an unpublished review in which Chekhov and the Russians figure centrally.
Main Description
In 1919, Virginia Woolf wrote, "The most inconclusive remarks upon modern English fiction can hardly avoid some mention of the Russian influence, and if the Russians are mentioned one runs the risk of feeling that to write of any fiction save theirs is a waste of time." In Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View , Roberta Rubenstein examines Woolf's responses to Russian literature over two decades and across the range of her fiction, essays, and book reviews. She argues that the Russian writers significantly influenced Woolf's developing Modernist aesthetic and left lasting marks on her theory and practice of fiction. The book includes transcriptions of forty-eight pages of Woolf's previously unpublished reading notes on Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Turgenev, and an unpublished reviewin which Chekhov and the Russians figure centrally.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Roberta Rubenstein brings together Virginia Woolf's essays & book reviews on Russian literature, her unpublished reading notes on Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov & Turgenev, & commentary concerning her response to each of the major Russian writers.
Description for Bookstore
This book brings together Virginia Woolf's essays and book reviews on Russian literature; her unpublished reading notes on Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and Turgenev; and new and insightful scholarly commentary concerning her response to each of the major Russian writers.
Description for Bookstore
This is the first time the edited transcriptions of Woolf's reading notes on Russian literature will appear in print
Main Description
In 1919, Virginia Woolf wrote, "The most inconclusive remarks upon modern English fiction can hardly avoid some mention of the Russian influence, and if the Russians are mentioned one runs the risk of feeling that to write of any fiction save theirs is a waste of time." In Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View , Roberta Rubenstein examines Woolf's responses to Russian literature over two decades and across the range of her fiction, essays, and book reviews. She argues that the Russian writers significantly influenced Woolf's developing Modernist aesthetic and left lasting marks on her theory and practice of fiction. The book includes transcriptions of forty-eight pages of Woolf's previously unpublished reading notes on Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Turgenev, and an unpublished review in which Chekhov and the Russians figure centrally.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xiii
Explanation of Editorial Markingsp. xv
Russophiliap. 1
Dostoevsky: "The dim and populous underworld"p. 19
Chekhov: "An astonishing sense of freedom"p. 59
Tolstoy: "Genius in the raw"p. 97
Turgenev: "A passion for art"p. 131
Conclusion: "The accent falls a little differently ..."p. 157
Appendices Virginia Woolf's Reading Notes on Russian Literature Transcribed and Edited by Roberta Rubensteinp. 163
Reading Notes on Dostoevsky's The Possessedp. 165
"Tchekov on Pope": Holograph Draftp. 175
"Tchekhov on Pope": Typescript of Unpublished Reviewp. 187
Reading Notes on Anna Karenina (I)p. 193
Reading Notes on Anna Kareinia (II)p. 195
Reading Notes on War and Peacep. 203
Reading Notes on Turgenevp. 205
Notesp. 229
Works citedp. 245
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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