Catalogue

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Visualizing data /
Ben Fry.
imprint
Sebastopol, CA : O'Reilly Media, Inc., 2008.
description
xiii, 366 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0596514557 (pbk.), 9780596514556 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Sebastopol, CA : O'Reilly Media, Inc., 2008.
isbn
0596514557 (pbk.)
9780596514556 (pbk.)
abstract
Provides information on the methods of visualizing data on the Web, along with example projects and code.
catalogue key
6937617
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 345-348) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, September 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Enormous quantities of data go unused or underused today, simply because people can't visualize the quantities and relationships in it. Using a downloadable programming environment developed by the author, "Visualizing Data" demonstrates methods for representing data accurately on the Web and elsewhere, complete with user interaction, animation, and more.
Main Description
Enormous quantities of data go unused or underused today, simply because people can't visualize the quantities and relationships in it. Using a downloadable programming environment developed by the author, Visualizing Data demonstrates methods for representing data accurately on the Web and elsewhere, complete with user interaction, animation, and more.How do the 3.1 billion A, C, G and T letters of the human genome compare to those of a chimp or a mouse? What do the paths that millions of visitors take through a web site look like? With Visualizing Data, you learn how to answer complex questions like these with thoroughly interactive displays. We're not talking about cookie-cutter charts and graphs. This book teaches you how to design entire interfaces around large, complex data sets with the help of a powerful new design and prototyping tool called "Processing".
Main Description
Enormous quantities of data go unused or underused today, simply because people can't visualize the quantities and relationships in it. Using a downloadable programming environment developed by the author, Visualizing Data demonstrates methods for representing data accurately on the Web and elsewhere, complete with user interaction, animation, and more. How do the 3.1 billion A, C, G and T letters of the human genome compare to those of a chimp or a mouse? What do the paths that millions of visitors take through a web site look like? With Visualizing Data , you learn how to answer complex questions like these with thoroughly interactive displays. We're not talking about cookie-cutter charts and graphs. This book teaches you how to design entire interfaces around large, complex data sets with the help of a powerful new design and prototyping tool called "Processing". Used by many researchers and companies to convey specific data in a clear and understandable manner, the Processing beta is available free. With this tool and Visualizing Data as a guide, you'll learn basic visualization principles, how to choose the right kind of display for your purposes, and how to provide interactive features that will bring users to your site over and over. This book teaches you: The seven stages of visualizing data -- acquire, parse, filter, mine, represent, refine, and interact How all data problems begin with a question and end with a narrative construct that provides a clear answer without extraneous details Several example projects with the code to make them work Positive and negative points of each representation discussed. The focus is on customization so that each one best suits what you want to convey about your data set The book does not provide ready-made "visualizations" that can be plugged into any data set. Instead, with chapters divided by types of data rather than types of display, you'll learn how each visualization conveys the unique properties of the data it represents -- why the data was collected, what's interesting about it, and what stories it can tell. Visualizing Data teaches you how to answer questions, not simply display information.
Main Description
Enormous quantities of data go unused or underused today, simply because people can't visualize the quantities and relationships in it. Using a downloadable programming environment developed by the author, Visualizing Data demonstrates methods for representing data accurately on the Web and elsewhere, complete with user interaction, animation, and more.How do the 3.1 billion A, C, G and T letters of the human genome compare to those of a chimp or a mouse? What do the paths that millions of visitors take through a web site look like? With Visualizing Data, you learn how to answer complex questions like these with thoroughly interactive displays. We're not talking about cookie-cutter charts and graphs. This book teaches you how to design entire interfaces around large, complex data sets with the help of a powerful new design and prototyping tool called "Processing".Used by many researchers and companies to convey specific data in a clear and understandable manner, the Processing beta is available free. With this tool and Visualizing Data as a guide, you'll learn basic visualization principles, how to choose the right kind of display for your purposes, and how to provide interactive features that will bring users to your site over and over. This book teaches you: The seven stages of visualizing data -- acquire, parse, filter, mine, represent, refine, and interact How all data problems begin with a question and end with a narrative construct that provides a clear answer without extraneous details Several example projects with the code to make them work Positive and negative points of each representation discussed. The focus is on customization so that each one best suits what you want to convey about your data set The book does not provide ready-made "visualizations" that can be plugged into any data set. Instead, with chapters divided by types of data rather than types of display, you'll learn how each visualization conveys the unique properties of the data it represents -- why the data was collected, what's interesting about it, and what stories it can tell. Visualizing Data teaches you how to answer questions, not simply display information.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
The Seven Stages of Visualizing Datap. 1
Why Data Display Requires Planningp. 2
An Examplep. 6
Iteration and Combinationp. 14
Principlesp. 15
Onwardp. 18
Getting Started with Processingp. 19
Sketching with Processingp. 20
Exporting and Distributing Your Workp. 23
Examples and Referencep. 24
Functionsp. 27
Sketching and Scriptingp. 28
Ready?p. 30
Mappingp. 31
Drawing a Mapp. 31
Locations on a Mapp. 32
Data on a Mapp. 34
Using Your Own Datap. 51
Next Stepsp. 53
Time Seriesp. 54
Milk, Tea, and Coffee (Acquire and Parse)p. 55
Cleaning the Table (Filter and Mine)p. 55
A Simple Plot (Represent and Refine)p. 57
Labeling the Current Data Set (Refine and Interact)p. 59
Drawing Axis Labels (Refine)p. 62
Choosing a Proper Representation (Represent and Refine)p. 73
Using Rollovers to Highlight Points (Interact)p. 76
Ways to Connect Points (Refine)p. 77
Text Labels As Tabbed Panes (Interact)p. 83
Interpolation Between Data Sets (Interact)p. 87
End of the Seriesp. 92
Connections and Correlationsp. 94
Changing Data Sourcesp. 94
Problem Statementp. 95
Preprocessingp. 96
Using the Preprocessed Data (Acquire, Parse, Filter, Mine)p. 111
Displaying the Results (Represent)p. 118
Returning to the Question (Refine)p. 121
Sophisticated Sorting: Using Salary As a Tiebreaker (Mine)p. 126
Moving to Multiple Days (Interact)p. 127
Smoothing Out the Interaction (Refine)p. 132
Deployment Considerations (Acquire, Parse, Filter)p. 133
Scatterplot Mapsp. 145
Preprocessingp. 145
Loading the Data (Acquire and Parse)p. 155
Drawing a Scatterplot of Zip Codes (Mine and Represent)p. 157
Highlighting Points While Typing (Refine and Interact)p. 158
Show the Currently Selected Point (Refine)p. 162
Progressively Dimming and Brightening Points (Refine)p. 165
Zooming In (Interact)p. 167
Changing How Points Are Drawn When Zooming (Refine)p. 177
Deployment Issues (Acquire and Refine)p. 178
Next Stepsp. 180
Trees, Hierarchies, and Recursionp. 182
Using Recursion to Build a Directory Treep. 182
Using a Queue to Load Asynchronously (Interact)p. 186
An Introduction to Treemapsp. 189
Which Files Are Using the Most Space?p. 194
Viewing Folder Contents (Interact)p. 199
Improving the Treemap Display (Refine)p. 201
Flying Through Files (Interact)p. 208
Next Stepsp. 219
Networks and Graphsp. 220
Simple Graph Demop. 220
A More Complicated Graphp. 229
Approaching Network Problemsp. 240
Advanced Graph Examplep. 242
Mining Additional Informationp. 262
Acquiring Datap. 264
Where to Find Datap. 265
Tools for Acquiring Data from the Internetp. 266
Locating Files for Use with Processingp. 268
Loading Text Datap. 270
Dealing with Files and Foldersp. 276
Listing Files in a Folderp. 277
Asynchronous Image Downloadsp. 281
Using openStream() As a Bridge to Javap. 284
Dealing with Byte Arraysp. 284
Advanced Web Techniquesp. 284
Using a Databasep. 288
Dealing with a Large Number of Filesp. 295
Parsing Datap. 296
Levels of Effortp. 296
Tools for Gathering Cluesp. 298
Text Is Bestp. 299
Text Markup Languagesp. 303
Regular Expressions (regexps)p. 316
Grammars and BNF Notationp. 316
Compressed Datap. 317
Vectors and Geometryp. 320
Binary Data Formatsp. 325
Advanced Detective Workp. 328
Integrating Processing with Javap. 331
Programming Modesp. 331
Additional Source Files (Tabs)p. 334
The Preprocessorp. 335
API Structurep. 336
Embedding PApplet into Java Applicationsp. 338
Using Java Code in a Processing Sketchp. 342
Using Librariesp. 343
Building with the Source for processing.corep. 343
Bibliographyp. 345
Indexp. 349
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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