Catalogue


"The tyranny of printers" : newspaper politics in the early American republic /
Jeffrey L. Pasley.
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 2003.
description
xviii, 517 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0813921775
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 2003.
isbn
0813921775
general note
First published, 2001.
catalogue key
6932065
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 467-498) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jeffrey L. Pasley, a former staff writer for the New Republic, is Associate Professor of History, University of Missouri-Columbia
Reviews
Review Quotes
This liberal critique should be read by many of the great number who are now exposed to the conservative biography of Adams by David McCullough.... [The Tyranny of Printers] is a sprightly and provocative history, written with far more flair than the usual scholarly treatise.
This is a tremendously valuable work.... Anyone interested in journalism, the rise of political parties, or early America should read The Tyranny of Printers at least twice.
The Tyranny of Printers is...an essential journey for those who care about the history of our nation's early years, and the emergence of ordinary artisans as extraordinary leaders, sounding and heeding the call to freedom.
The most comprehensive and important work on the partisan printer-editors of the early republic.... [I]t is the first work students and general readers should consult on the subject.
Pasley's book is the best ever written about journalism in the early republic and one of the best about the broader political culture of that era.... For the first time, we can see, brightly and clearly, the vital importance of that era in the history of journalism.
This is an important book not just for historians of the press, but for students of the early republic generally. Highly recommended.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
Although frequently attacked for their partisanship and undue political influence, the American media of today are objective and relatively ineffectual compared to their counterparts of two hundred years ago. From the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, newspapers were the republic's central political institutions, working components of the party system rather than commentators on it. The Tyranny of Printers narrates the rise of this newspaper-based politics, in which editors became the chief party spokesmen and newspaper offices often served as local party headquarters. Beginning when Thomas Jefferson enlisted a Philadelphia editor to carry out his battle with Alexander Hamilton for the soul of the new republic (and got caught trying to cover it up), the centrality of newspapers in political life gained momentum after Jefferson's victory in 1800, which was widely credited to a superior network of papers. Jeffrey L. Pasley tells the rich story of this political culture and its culmination in Jacksonian democracy, enlivening his narrative with accounts of the colorful but often tragic careers of individual editors.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From the late-18th to the late-19th century, newspapers were the American Republic's central political institutions, working components of the party system. This is the story of the rise of this newspaper-based politics, beginning with Jefferson and culminating in Jacksonian democracy.
Main Description
Although frequently attacked for their partisanship and undue political influence, the American media of today are objective and relatively ineffectual compared to their counterparts of two hundred years ago. From the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, newspapers were the republics central political institutions, working components of the party system rather than commentators on it. "The Tyranny of Printers "narrates the rise of this newspaper-based politics, in which editors became the chief party spokesmen and newspaper offices often served as local party headquarters. Beginning when Thomas Jefferson enlisted a Philadelphia editor to carry out his battle with Alexander Hamilton for the soul of the new republic (and got caught trying to cover it up), the centrality of newspapers in political life gained momentum after Jeffersons victory in 1800, which was widely credited to a superior network of papers. Jeffrey L. Pasley tells the rich story of this political culture and its culmination in Jacksonian democracy, enlivening his narrative with accounts of the colorful but often tragic careers of individual editors.
Main Description
"The most comprehensive and important work on the partisan printer-editors of the early republic.... I]t is the first work students and general readers should consult on the subject." --Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
A Note on Conventions and Methodsp. xvii
The Newspaper-Based Political System of the Nineteenth-Century United Statesp. 1
The Printing Trade in Early American Politicsp. 24
The Two National Gazettes and the Beginnings of Newspaper Politicsp. 48
Benjamin Franklin Bache and the Price of Partisanshipp. 79
The Background and Failure of the Sedition Actp. 105
Charles Holt's Generation: From Commercial Printers to Political Professionalsp. 132
The Expansion of the Republican Newspaper Network, 1798-1800p. 153
A Presence in the Public Sphere: William Duane and the Triumph of Newspaper Politicsp. 176
The New Conventional Wisdom: Consolidating and Expanding a Newspaper-Based Political Systemp. 196
The Federalists Strike Backp. 229
Improving on the Sedition Act: Press Freedom and Political Culture after 1800p. 258
The "Tyranny of Printers" in Jeffersonian Philadelphiap. 285
Ordinary Editors and Everyday Politics: How the System Workedp. 320
Newspaper Editors and the Reconstruction of Party Politicsp. 348
Charts on the Growth of the American Pressp. 401
The Sedition Act and the Expansion of the Republican Pressp. 407
Notesp. 411
Selected Bibliographyp. 467
Indexp. 499
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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