Catalogue

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Contested island : Ireland, 1460-1630 /
S.J. Connolly.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.
description
x, 426 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199563713 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780199563715 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.
isbn
0199563713 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780199563715 (pbk. : alk. paper)
general note
Originally published: 2007.
catalogue key
6927929
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-08-01:
Editor of The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2nd ed.; CH, Dec'02, 40-1935) and author of Religion, Law, and Power: The Making of Protestant Ireland, 1660-1760 (CH, Feb'93, 30-3393), Connelly (Queen's Univ., Belfast) addresses a difficult period in Irish history. Between 1460 and 1630, medieval Irish society emerged through the thicket of archaic custom, competing warlords, Gaelic law, and bardic tradition into a unified though still primitive state with one code of law and a developing market economy. This is a narrative of great complexity, difficult names, and unfamiliar customs and social relations driven by extraordinary violence, mismanagement, and the pursuit of private interests. Connelly achieves an impressive mastery of his subject. His text is dense and complex but clearly written and well worth the reader's effort. The political narrative is foremost. The author makes sense of the fall of the earls of Kildare, the decline of the old English and rise of the new, the erratic evolution of Tudor policy, the Irish Reformation, Tyrone's rebellion, and the plantations of Munster and Ulster. He also integrates social, economic, and cultural history. An indispensable book for all students of early modern Irish and British history. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. W. Wood Jr. emeritus, Western Carolina University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Regularly itemizing exquisite details of much political intrigue, Connolly provides lucid accounts of the growing corruption, duplicity and profiteering of New English officials."--William J. Smyth, Irish Times "Smart and insightful."--Patrick Griffin, Field Day Review
"Regularly itemizing exquisite details of much political intrigue, Connolly provides lucid accounts of the growing corruption, duplicity and profiteering of New English officials."--William J. Smyth, Irish Times "Smart and insightful."--Patrick Griffin, Field Day Review "[Connolly is] a historian of exacting standards...[he] unobtrusively picks his way through the contested historiography, entering a footnoted caveat here and offering a sensible qualification there...[all] with his customary craftsmanship." -- The Historian
"Regularly itemizing exquisite details of much political intrigue, Connolly provides lucid accounts of the growing corruption, duplicity and profiteering of New English officials."--William J. Smyth, Irish Times "Smart and insightful."--Patrick Griffin, Field Day Review "[Connolly is] a historian of exacting standards...[he] unobtrusively picks his way through the contested historiography, entering a footnoted caveat here and offering a sensible qualification there...[all] with his customary craftsmanship." -- The Historian "[An] impressive book. Connolly has written a volumem that will be of enduring value both to teachers and students of early modern Ireland for many years to come." -- Europe: Early Modern and Modern
"Regularly itemizing exquisite details of much political intrigue, Connolly provides lucid accounts of the growing corruption, duplicity and profiteering of New English officials."--William J. Smyth,Irish Times "Smart and insightful."--Patrick Griffin,Field Day Review "[Connolly is] a historian of exacting standards...[he] unobtrusively picks his way through the contested historiography, entering a footnoted caveat here and offering a sensible qualification there...[all] with his customary craftsmanship." -- The Historian "[An] impressive book. Connolly has written a volumem that will be of enduring value both to teachers and students of early modern Ireland for many years to come." --Europe: Early Modern and Modern "The sheer breadth of information and attention to detail are comng the greatest strengths and most rewarding characteristics of Connolly's books." --World History Bulletin
Review from previous edition: "Regularly itemising exquisite details of much political intrigue, Connolly provides lucid accounts of the growing corruption, duplicity and profiteering of New English officials." --William J Smyth, Irish Times
"smart and insightful" --Patrick Griffin, Field Day Review
With his customary craftsmanship Connolly narrates and analyzes the complicated politics and escalating violence...
'Review from previous edition 'Regularly itemising exquisite details of much political intrigue, Connolly provides lucid accounts of the growing corruption, duplicity and profiteering of New English officials.''William J Smyth, Irish Times''smart and insightful''Patrick Griffin, Field Day Review
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This definitive study of Ireland's transformation from a medieval to a modern society looks at the way in which the country's different religious groups, and nationalities, clashed and interacted during the transition.
Long Description
Between the 1460s and the 1630s Ireland was transformed from a medieval into a modern society. A poor society on the periphery of Europe, dominated by the conflicts of competing warlords- Irish and English- it later became a centralized political unit with a single government and code of laws, and a still primitive, but rapidly developing, market economy. These changes, however, had been achieved by brutal wars of conquest, while large scale colonization projects had created lastingtensions between old inhabitants and recent settlers. At the same time the great religious divide of the Reformation had introduced a further source of conflict to Ireland, dividing the population into two hostile camps, while at the same time giving it a new and dangerous role in the conflict between England and its continental enemies. Against this confused and constantly changing background, individuals and groups repeatedly had to adapt their customs and behaviour, their political allegiances and aspirations, and their sense of who they were.A long and complex story, with many false starts and numerous dead ends, it is the story of the people who became the modern Irish.
Main Description
Between the 1460s and the 1630s Ireland was transformed from a medieval into a modern society. A poor society on the periphery of Europe, dominated by the conflicts of competing warlords--Irish and English--it later became a centralised political unit with a single government and code of laws, and a still primitive, but rapidly developing, market economy. These changes, however, had been achieved by brutal wars of conquest, while large scale colonisation projects had created lasting tensions between old inhabitants and recent settlers. At the same time the great religious divide of the Reformation had introduced a further source of conflict to Ireland, dividing the population into two hostile camps, while at the same time giving it a new and dangerous role in the conflict between England and its continental enemies. Against this confused and constantly changing background, individuals and groups had repeatedly to adapt their customs and behaviour, their political allegiances and aspirations, and their sense of who they were. A long and complex story, with many false starts and numerous dead ends, it is the story of the people who became the modern Irish.
Main Description
Between the 1460s and the 1630s Ireland was transformed from a medieval into a modern society. A poor society on the periphery of Europe, dominated by the conflicts of competing warlords - Irish and English - it later became a centralized political unit with a single government and code oflaws, and a still primitive, but rapidly developing, market economy. These changes, however, had been achieved by brutal wars of conquest, while large scale colonization projects had created lasting tensions between old inhabitants and recent settlers. At the same time the great religious divide of the Reformation had introduced a further source of conflict to Ireland, dividing the population into two hostile camps, while at the same time giving it a new and dangerous role in the conflict between England and its continental enemies. Against thisconfused and constantly changing background, individuals and groups repeatedly had to adapt their customs and behaviour, their political allegiances and aspirations, and their sense of who they were. A long and complex story, with many false starts and numerous dead ends, it is the story of thepeople who became the modern Irish.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Battle of Knockdoe 1504
Late Medieval Ireland
From Lordship to Kingdom
Expansion and Resistance
The Wars of Ireland
Wild Fruit from Savage Soil
The Third Kingdom
Religion and Nation
Epilogue: New English, New Irish?
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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