Catalogue


The geographic spread of infectious diseases : models and applications /
Lisa Sattenspiel with contributions from Alun Lloyd.
imprint
Princeton ; Oxford : Princeton University Press, [2009]
description
x, 286 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm
ISBN
069112132X, 9780691121321
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Princeton ; Oxford : Princeton University Press, [2009]
isbn
069112132X
9780691121321
contents note
The art of epidemic modeling : concepts and basic structures -- Modeling the geographic spread of influenza epidemics -- Modeling geographic spread I : population-based approaches -- Spatial heterogeneity and endemicity : the case of measles -- Modeling geographic spread II : individual-based approaches -- Spatial models and the control of foot-and-mouth disease -- Maps, projections, and GIS : geographers' approaches -- Revisiting SARS and looking to the future.
catalogue key
6923051
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages [237]-278) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lisa Sattenspiel is professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri. Alun Lloyd is associate professor of mathematics at North Carolina State University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Sattenspiel and Lloyd do a first-rate job of making a lot of material accessible to a broad audience. They focus on a handful of examples and provide comprehensive insights. I found this book to be tightly and cogently written, supplying a level of detail that will be really useful for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers. It is one I would certainly recommend."-- Andrew P. Dobson, Princeton University
Flap Copy
"Sattenspiel and Lloyd do a first-rate job of making a lot of material accessible to a broad audience. They focus on a handful of examples and provide comprehensive insights. I found this book to be tightly and cogently written, supplying a level of detail that will be really useful for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers. It is one I would certainly recommend."--Andrew P. Dobson, Princeton University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Sattenspiel and Lloyd do a first-rate job of making a lot of material accessible to a broad audience. They focus on a handful of examples and provide comprehensive insights. I found this book to be tightly and cogently written, supplying a level of detail that will be really useful for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers. It is one I would certainly recommend.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The 1918-19 influenza epidemic killed more than fifty million people worldwide. The SARS epidemic of 2002-3, by comparison, killed fewer than a thousand. The success in containing the spread of SARS was due largely to the rapid global response of public health authorities, which was aided by insights resulting from mathematical models. Models enabled authorities to better understand how the disease spread and to assess the relative effectiveness of different control strategies. In this book, Lisa Sattenspiel and Alun Lloyd provide a comprehensive introduction to mathematical models in epidemiology and show how they can be used to predict and control the geographic spread of major infectious diseases. Key concepts in infectious disease modeling are explained, readers are guided from simple mathematical models to more complex ones, and the strengths and weaknesses of these models are explored. The book highlights the breadth of techniques available to modelers today, such as population-based and individual-based models, and covers specific applications as well. Sattenspiel and Lloyd examine the powerful mathematical models that health authorities have developed to understand the spatial distribution and geographic spread of influenza, measles, foot-and-mouth disease, and SARS. Analytic methods geographers use to study human infectious diseases and the dynamics of epidemics are also discussed. A must-read for students, researchers, and practitioners, no other book provides such an accessible introduction to this exciting and fast-evolving field.
Main Description
The 1918-19 influenza epidemic killed more than fifty million people worldwide. The SARS epidemic of 2002-3, by comparison, killed fewer than a thousand. The success in containing the spread of SARS was due largely to the rapid global response of public health authorities, which was aided by insights resulting from mathematical models. Models enabled authorities to better understand how the disease spread and to assess the relative effectiveness of different control strategies. In this book, Lisa Sattenspiel and Alun Lloyd provide a comprehensive introduction to mathematical models in epidemiology and show how they can be used to predict and control the geographic spread of major infectious diseases.Key concepts in infectious disease modeling are explained, readers are guided from simple mathematical models to more complex ones, and the strengths and weaknesses of these models are explored. The book highlights the breadth of techniques available to modelers today, such as population-based and individual-based models, and covers specific applications as well. Sattenspiel and Lloyd examine the powerful mathematical models that health authorities have developed to understand the spatial distribution and geographic spread of influenza, measles, foot-and-mouth disease, and SARS. Analytic methods geographers use to study human infectious diseases and the dynamics of epidemics are also discussed. A must-read for students, researchers, and practitioners, no other book provides such an accessible introduction to this exciting and fast-evolving field.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Mathematical Models and the Geographic Spread of Epidemicsp. 5
Structure of this Bookp. 11
The Art of Epidemic Modeling: Concepts and Basic Structuresp. 12
Essential Biological and Epidemiological Conceptsp. 12
The Cornerstone of Many Epidemic Models - the SIR Modelp. 16
Demography and Epidemic Modelsp. 23
More Complex Modelsp. 25
The Basic Reproductive Number Revisitedp. 53
Modeling the Geographic Spread of Influenza Epidemicsp. 58
A Brief Overview of the Biology of Influenzap. 58
Population-based Influenza Modelsp. 61
Individual-based Influenza Modelsp. 77
So What Kind of Model Should One Use to Study Influenza Transmission?p. 84
Modeling Geographic Spread I: Population-based Approachesp. 86
Spatial Structure and Disease Transmission: Basic Themesp. 86
Spatial Modeling Frameworksp. 89
Metapopulation Modelsp. 90
Spatially Continuous Modelsp. 102
Spatial Heterogeneity and Endemicity: The Case of Measlesp. 117
The Persistence and Long-term Cycling of Measlesp. 122
Spatial Heterogeneity, Synchrony, and the Spatial Spread of Measlesp. 125
Modeling Geographic Spread II: Individual-based Approachesp. 134
Historical Underpinnings of the Use of Networks in Epidemiologyp. 137
The Nature of Networksp. 140
The Language of Network Analysisp. 142
Major Classes of Networksp. 150
The Influence of Networks on the Dynamics of Epidemic Spreadp. 159
Theoretical Analysis of Network Modelsp. 162
The Basic Reproductive Number in Network Modelsp. 168
Infection Control on Networksp. 171
Why Aren't There More Applications of Network Models for Spatial Spread?p. 173
Spatial Models and the Control of Foot-and-Mouth Diseasep. 176
Modeling the Geographic Spread of FMDp. 180
The Official Response to the Epidemic and Its Aftermathp. 185
Maps, Projections, and G1S: Geographers' Approachesp. 191
Mapping Methodsp. 191
Identifying Patterns of Disease Diffusionp. 195
Epidemic Projectionsp. 204
Detection of Disease Clusteringp. 208
New and Potential Directionsp. 211
Revisiting SARS and Looking to the Futurep. 215
Did Mathematical Modeling Help to Stop the 2003 SARS Epidemic?p. 215
Modeling the Geographic Spread of Past, Present, and Future Infectious Disease Epidemics: Lessons and Advicep. 223
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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