Catalogue


Victorian Christmas in print /
Tara Moore.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
194 p.
ISBN
0230616542 (alk. paper), 9780230616547 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230616542 (alk. paper)
9780230616547 (alk. paper)
contents note
Books for Christmas, 1822-1860 -- How Victorians read Christmas -- How Mr. Punch stole Christmas: the evolution of the holiday in periodicals -- Ghost stories at Christmas -- The expansion of Christmas consumerism: gifts and commodities -- The poetry of Christmas -- Modern marketing of the Victorian Christmas.
catalogue key
6919223
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Tara Moore is an Instructor at Pennsylvania State University's York campus. Her published articles are about food and starvation in Christmas literature and the work of Charlotte Bront.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Through thoughtful incursions into the print culture of the nineteenth century, Stern revises mistaken assumptions about the Victorian Christmas. Her probing analysis of Victorian writing and reading explodes the myths of an exclusively Dickensian Christmas while at the same time acknowledging the ghost of Charles Dickens in Christmases past and present. Here is a fine read for any student of Christmas culture."--Barbara T. Gates, Alumni Distinguished Professor of English and Women's Studies, University of Delaware
"Moore has usefully demarcated the terrain and tropes of a seasonal literature central to Victorian cultural experience. Of particular interest to students of the periodical press and nineteenth-century cultural studies, Moore's study demonstrates the very material connections between Christmas past and Christmas present, while setting the stage for Christmas studies yet to come."-- Victorian Studies "Through thoughtful incursions into the print culture of the nineteenth century, Stern revises mistaken assumptions about the Victorian Christmas. Her probing analysis of Victorian writing and reading explodes the myths of an exclusively Dickensian Christmas while at the same time acknowledging the ghost of Charles Dickens in Christmases past and present. Here is a fine read for any student of Christmas culture."--Barbara T. Gates, Alumni Distinguished Professor of English and Women's Studies, University of Delaware
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Moore analyzes how the Christmas holiday, revitalized during the Victorian era, and the flurry of texts supporting it contributed to English national identity.
Main Description
Although people may not realize it, the modern Christmas book market carries on a Victorian legacy. An explosion of Christmas print matter reinvigorated and regularized the holiday during the mid-Victorian period, infusing Christmas with emotionally-charged expectations of reading. Tara Moore elucidates the evolution of Christmas publishing trends that dictated authors' writing schedules and reflected gift-giving rituals. As Victorian shopping customs evolved, publishers satisfiedconsumers with a range of holiday print matter, including novels, ghost stories, periodicals, children's books, and poetry. Ultimately, Victorian Christmas in Print analyzes how the revitalized holiday and the flurry of texts supporting it contributed to English national identity.
Main Description
Although people may not realize it, the modern Christmas book market carries on a Victorian legacy. An explosion of Christmas print matter reinvigorated and regularized the holiday during the mid-Victorian period, infusing Christmas with emotionally-charged expectations of reading. Tara Moore elucidates the evolution of Christmas publishing trends that dictated authors' writing schedules and reflected gift-giving rituals. As Victorian shopping customs evolved, publishers satisfied consumers with a range of holiday print matter, including novels, ghost stories, periodicals, children's books, and poetry. Ultimately,Victorian Christmas in Printanalyzes how the revitalized holiday and the flurry of texts supporting it contributed to English national identity.
Description for Bookstore
Moore follows the evolution of Christmas publishing according to genre, combining a favourite cultural topic with rigorous research
Main Description
Although people may not realize it, the modern Christmas book market carries on a Victorian legacy. An explosion of Christmas print matter reinvigorated and regularized the holiday during the mid-Victorian period, infusing Christmas with emotionally-charged expectations of reading. Tara Moore elucidates the evolution of Christmas publishing trends that dictated authors' writing schedules and reflected gift-giving rituals. As Victorian shopping customs evolved, publishers satisfied consumers with a range of holiday print matter, including novels, ghost stories, periodicals, children's books, and poetry. Ultimately, Victorian Christmas in Print analyzes how the revitalized holiday and the flurry of texts supporting it contributed to English national identity.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Books for Christmas, 1822-1860p. 9
How Victorians Read Christmasp. 33
How Mr. Punch Stole Christmas: The Evolution of the Holiday in Periodicalsp. 59
Ghost Stories at Christmasp. 81
The Expansion of Christmas Consumerism: Gifts and Commoditiesp. 99
The Poetry of Christmasp. 121
Modern Marketing of the Victorian Christmasp. 141
Notesp. 155
Works Citedp. 177
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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