Catalogue


Native people of southern New England, 1650-1775 /
by Kathleen J. Bragdon.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.
description
xviii, 293 p.
ISBN
0806140046 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780806140049 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.
isbn
0806140046 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780806140049 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Eidos and ethos -- Ethnographies of speaking. local linguistic communities -- Social relationships in a colonial context. families, marriage, and authority -- Complexities of cohabitation and race -- Material life in colonial indian communities -- Christianity and literacy -- Regional networks, itinerant people -- Being Indian in colonial New England.
catalogue key
6915889
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-03-01:
Bragdon (anthropology, College of William and Mary) has for decades studied the languages and cultures of southern New England Indians, and this book seems intended to summarize her findings. She seeks to show that during the Colonial period, the "shared ideas that organized and explained Native life . . . [were] derived from or consistent with those of the precolonial past" (p. 6). Bragdon uses anthropological theories and a few prominent examples from Native writings and Colonial descriptions to highlight continuity in patterns of authority, social relations, marriage, gender, and regional networks--even in Christianity and literacy. Unfortunately, continuity alone provides an incomplete and distorted picture. Missing from this book are important elements of change experienced by Indians: the deaths of many men in Colonial wars or their disappearance at sea, massive land losses, intermarriage with blacks, alcohol abuse, debt peonage, migration to port towns, and by 1775 the near extinction of the Massachusett language. Bragdon also fails to offer evidence or examples for many significant statements: for example, that the legal system gave preference to Indians with claims to English blood (p. 128). Finally, she ignores or caricatures how historians since 1970 have depicted Indians in the region during this period. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students/faculty. D. R. Mandell Truman State University
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Choice, March 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
Despite the popular assumption that Native American cultures in New England declined after Europeans arrived, evidence suggests that Indian communities continued to thrive alongside English colonists. In this sequel to her Native People of Southern New England, 15001650, Kathleen J. Bragdon continues the Indian story through the end of the colonial era and documents the impact of colonization. As she traces changes in Native social, cultural, and economic life, Bragdon explores what it meant to be Indian in colonial southern New England. Contrary to common belief, Bragdon argues, Indianness meant continuing Native lives and lifestyles, however distinct from those of the newcomers. She recreates Indian cosmology, moral values, community organization, and material culture to demonstrate that networks based on kinship, marriage, traditional residence patterns, and work all fostered a culture resistant to assimilation. Bragdon draws on the writings and reported speech of Indians to counter what colonists claimed to be signs of assimilation. She shows that when Indians adopted English cultural forms-such as Christianity and writing-they did so on their own terms, using these alternative tools for expressing their own ideas about power and the spirit world. Despite warfare, disease epidemics, and colonists' attempts at cultural suppression, distinctive Indian cultures persisted. Bragdon's scholarship gives us new insight into both the history of the tribes of southern New England and the nature of cultural contact.
Main Description
Explores Indian life in colonial southern New England Despite the popular assumption that Native American cultures in New England declined after Europeans arrived, evidence suggests that Indian communities continued to thrive alongside English colonists. In this sequel to her Native People of Southern New England, 1500-1650, Kathleen J. Bragdon continues the Indian story through the end of the colonial era and documents the impact of colonization. As she traces changes in Native social, cultural, and economic life, Bragdon explores what it meant to be Indian in colonial southern New England. Contrary to common belief, Bragdon argues, Indianness meant continuing Native lives and lifestyles, however distinct from those of the newcomers. She recreates Indian cosmology, moral values, community organization, and material culture to demonstrate that networks based on kinship, marriage, traditional residence patterns, and work all fostered a culture resistant to assimilation. Bragdon draws on the writings and reported speech of Indians to counter what colonists claimed to be signs of assimilation. She shows that when Indians adopted English cultural forms--such as Christianity and writing--they did so on their own terms, using these alternative tools for expressing their own ideas about power and the spirit world. Despite warfare, disease epidemics, and colonists' attempts at cultural suppression, distinctive Indian cultures persisted. Bragdon's scholarship gives us new insight into both the history of the tribes of southern New England and the nature of cultural contact.
Main Description
Explores Indian life in colonial southern New England
Main Description
Despite the popular assumption that Native American cultures in New England declined after Europeans arrived, evidence suggests that Indian communities continued to thrive alongside English colonists. In this sequel to her Native People of Southern New England, 1500–1650, Kathleen J. Bragdon continues the Indian story through the end of the colonial era and documents the impact of colonization. As she traces changes in Native social, cultural, and economic life, Bragdon explores what it meant to be Indian in colonial southern New England. Contrary to common belief, Bragdon argues, Indianness meant continuing Native lives and lifestyles, however distinct from those of the newcomers. She recreates Indian cosmology, moral values, community organization, and material culture to demonstrate that networks based on kinship, marriage, traditional residence patterns, and work all fostered a culture resistant to assimilation. Bragdon draws on the writings and reported speech of Indians to counter what colonists claimed to be signs of assimilation. She shows that when Indians adopted English cultural forms-such as Christianity and writing-they did so on their own terms, using these alternative tools for expressing their own ideas about power and the spirit world. Despite warfare, disease epidemics, and colonists’ attempts at cultural suppression, distinctive Indian cultures persisted. Bragdon’s scholarship gives us new insight into both the history of the tribes of southern New England and the nature of cultural contact.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introductionp. 3
Eidos and Ethosp. 22
Ethnographies of Speaking: Local Linguistic Communitiesp. 55
Social Relationships in a Colonial Context: Families, Marriage, and Authorityp. 82
Complexities of Cohabitation and Racep. 119
Material Life in Colonial Indian Communitiesp. 132
Christianity and Literacyp. 168
Regional Networks, Itinerant Peoplep. 199
Being Indian in Colonial New Englandp. 217
Conclusionsp. 231
Referencesp. 235
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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