Catalogue


Worlds of flow : a history of hydrodynamics from the Bernoullis to Prandtl /
Olivier Darrigol.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009, c2005.
description
xiv, 356 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199559112 (Paper), 9780199559114 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009, c2005.
isbn
0199559112 (Paper)
9780199559114 (Paper)
contents note
1. The dynamical equations; 2. Water waves; 3. Viscosity; 4. Vortices; 5. Instability; 6. Turbulence; 7. Drag and lift
general note
"First published 2005, first published in paperback 2009"--T.p. verso.
LCCN for hardcover is 200501963.
catalogue key
6908390
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [329]-349) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Olivier Darrigol is Research Director at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France. His previous book, Electrodynamics from Ampere to Einstein (OUP 2000), won the Marc-Auguste Pictet prize of the Societe de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Geneve in 2000. In 2004, he was awarded the Grammaticakis-Neumann prize of the French Academy of Sciences.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A fascinating and well written book.'Meccanica 2007
'By presenting in detail the interactions between many mathematicians and engineers, and by emphasizing the different styles characteristic of scientists in different countries, Darrigol has provided a fascinating insight into the development of hydrodynamics.'J. Stewart Turner, Australian National University, Canberra, August 2006, Physics World 2006
'The book is a valuable contribution to its subject and is likely to provide new and perhaps useful insights to those studying fluid dynamics. It is well written and produced.'D.H. Peregrine, Mathematical Reviews
'This book deserves a place in every university library, and it will surely be read with much interest, and some surprise, by many applied mathematicians.'Alex D.D. Craik, University of St Andrews, The London Mathematical Society Newsletter 2006
'This book deserves a place in every university library, and it will surely be read with much interest, and some surprise, by many applied mathematicians.'Alex D.D. Craik, University of St Andrews, The London Mathematical Society Newsletter 2006'The book is a valuable contribution to its subject and is likely to provide new and perhaps useful insights to those studying fluid dynamics. It is well written and produced.'D.H. Peregrine, Mathematical Reviews'By presenting in detail the interactions between many mathematicians and engineers, and by emphasizing the different styles characteristic of scientists in different countries, Darrigol has provided a fascinating insight into the development of hydrodynamics.'J. Stewart Turner, Australian National University, Canberra, August 2006, Physics World 2006'A fascinating and well written book.'Meccanica 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Olivier Darrigol provides a history of hydrodynamics, including accounts of the concrete problems of hydraulics, navigation, blood circulation, meteorology, and aeronautics that motivated the main conceptual innovations.
Main Description
The first of its kind, this book is an in-depth history of hydrodynamics from its eighteenth-century foundations to its first major successes in twentieth-century hydraulics and aeronautics. It documents the foundational role of fluid mechanics in developing a new mathematical physics. Itgives full and clear accounts of the conceptual breakthroughs of physicists and engineers who tried to meet challenges in the practical worlds of hydraulics, navigation, blood circulation, meteorology, and aeronautics, and it shows how hydrodynamics at last began to fulfill its early promise tounify the different worlds of flow. Richly illustrated, technically thorough, and sensitive to cross-cultural effects, this history should attract a broad range of historians, scientists, engineers, and philosophers and be a standard reference for anyone interested in fluid mechanics.
Table of Contents
Conventions and notationp. xiii
The dynamical equationsp. 1
Daniel Bernoulli's Hydrodynamicap. 4
Johann Bernoulli's Hydraulicap. 9
D'Alembert's fluid dynamicsp. 11
Euler's equationsp. 23
Lagrange's analysisp. 26
Water wavesp. 31
French mathematiciansp. 32
Scott Russell, the naval engineerp. 47
Tides and wavesp. 56
Finite wavesp. 69
The principle of interferencep. 85
Viscosityp. 101
Mathematicians' versus engineers' fluidsp. 103
Navier: molecular mechanics of solids and fluidsp. 109
Cauchy: stress and strainp. 119
Poisson: the rigors of discontinuityp. 122
Saint-Venant: slides and shearsp. 126
Stokes: the pendulump. 135
The Hagen-Poiseuille lawp. 140
Vorticesp. 145
Sound the organp. 146
Vortex motionp. 148
Vortex sheetsp. 159
Foehn, cyclones, and stormsp. 166
Trade windsp. 172
Wave formationp. 178
Instabilityp. 183
Divergent flowsp. 184
Discontinuous flowp. 188
Vortex atomsp. 190
The Thomson-Stokes debatep. 197
Parallel flowp. 208
Turbulencep. 219
Hydraulic phenomenologyp. 221
Saint-Venant on tumultuous watersp. 229
Boussinesq on open channelsp. 233
The turbulent etherp. 239
Reynolds's criterionp. 243
Drag and liftp. 264
Tentative theoriesp. 265
Ship resistancep. 273
Boundary layersp. 283
Wing theoryp. 302
Conclusionp. 323
Modern discussion of d'Alembert's paradoxp. 326
Bibliographyp. 329
Bibliographic abbreviationsp. 329
Bibliographic of primary literaturep. 330
Bibliographic of secondary literaturep. 344
Indexp. 350
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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