Catalogue


Class and race formation in North America /
James W. Russell.
imprint
Toronto ; Plymouth : University of Toronto Press, c2009.
description
xv, 204 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0802096786 (pbk.), 9780802096784 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Plymouth : University of Toronto Press, c2009.
isbn
0802096786 (pbk.)
9780802096784 (pbk.)
general note
Rev. ed. of: After the fifth sun. 1994.
catalogue key
6905364
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James W. Russell is University Professor of Sociology and directs the Latin American Studies Program at Eastern Connecticut State University. He was formerly Fulbright Research Professor at the North America Research Center of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City. He is the author of six books, including Double Standard: Social Policy in Europe and the United States (2006: Rowman and Littlefield) and Societies and Social Life: An Introduction to Sociology (2009: Sloan Publishing).
Reviews
Review Quotes
This comprehensive analysis of North American societies should be read by anyone interested in making sense of current social issues. It illustrates, through an examination of class and race, that today's conditions are the result of choices made over the last 500 years and that building better social structures in each country remains a choice today and in the future.
...a very important contribution to comparative studies of race and class.
"...a very important contribution to comparative studies of race and class." - Richard Griswold del Castillo, Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies, San Diego State University"This comprehensive analysis of North American societies should be read by anyone interested in making sense of current social issues. It illustrates, through an examination of class and race, that today's conditions are the result of choices made over the last 500 years and that building better social structures in each country remains a choice today and in the future." - Carlos Salas, El Colegio de Tlaxcala"Russell's meticulously researched and highly detailed book presents a critically important people's history of North America. For those interested in how class and race emerged and diverged among the three countries sharing this continent, this book provides rich insights and demonstrates the potential of comparative research to broaden our perspective." - Dan Zuberi, University of British Columbia, author of Differences That Matter: Social Policy and the Working Poor in the United States and Canada
Russell's meticulously researched and highly detailed book presents a critically important people's history of North America. For those interested in how class and race emerged and diverged among the three countries sharing this continent, this book provides rich insights and demonstrates the potential of comparative research to broaden our perspective.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
On August 13, 1521, the largest and most developed of North America's societies, the Aztec empire, fell to Spanish invaders who, along with later European colonizers, built new societies in which they occupied the dominant class positions and forced Indians, imported African slaves, and Asians into subordinate positions. As a result of the conquest, race has become an enduring issue in the class structuring of North American societies.Originally published as After the Fifth Sun: Class and Race in North America, this new, significantly expanded edition offers a comparative exploration of how patterns of class and racial inequality developed in the United States, Mexico, and Canada from colonial pasts to the beginning of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the post-NAFTA environment. What Russell reveals is a continent of diverse historical experiences, class systems, and ways of thinking about race.
Main Description
On August 13, 1521, the largest and most developed of North America's societies, the Aztec empire, fell to Spanish invaders who, along with later European colonizers, built new societies in which they occupied the dominant class positions and forced Indians, imported African slaves, and Asians into subordinate positions. As a result of the conquest, race has become an enduring issue in the class structuring of North American societies. Originally published as After the Fifth Sun: Class and Race in North America, this new, significantly expanded edition offers a comparative exploration of how patterns of class and racial inequality developed in the United States, Mexico, and Canada from colonial pasts to the beginning of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the post-NAFTA environment. What Russell reveals is a continent of diverse historical experiences, class systems, and ways of thinking about race.
Table of Contents
Mapsp. viii
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Three Faces of Capitalism and Democracyp. 2
Cultural Metaphorsp. 4
On the Language of Investigationp. 6
Origins of Inequality and Uneven Developmentp. 13
Indigenous Societies on the Eve of the Conquestp. 14
Europe on the Eve of the Conquestp. 17
The Conquestp. 18
Colonial Reconstructionp. 21
Spanish Colonial Societyp. 24
Capitalism, Feudalism, and New Francep. 30
Agrarian and Slave Capitalism in the British Coloniesp. 31
A New Empirep. 35
Origins of Empirep. 35
Violent Expropriation of Indian Landp. 36
Violent Expropriation of Mexican Landp. 38
The Civil Warp. 40
Reconstruction (1863-77)p. 42
Segregationp. 44
Orderly Expropriation in Canadap. 45
Marginal Slaveryp. 47
Tandem Developmentp. 48
Frustrated Capitalism in Mexicop. 48
Indiansp. 48
Landlords and the Churchp. 51
The Third Rootp. 52
Immigrationp. 55
European Immigration in the United Statesp. 55
Anglophones, Francophones, and Multiculturalismp. 58
A Dearth of Immigrants in Mexicop. 62
The New Crossingp. 62
Chinese-North Americansp. 62
Japanese-North Americansp. 67
Filipino-North Americansp. 71
Race Mixturep. 73
México Mestizop. 73
The Canadian Métisp. 76
Racially Mixed and Socially Black in the United Statesp. 78
Accumulation of Capital and Dependent Developmentp. 85
Accumulation of Capitalp. 85
Technological Developmentp. 88
So Close to the United Statesp. 89
The U.S.-Mexico Borderp. 89
Maquiladorasp. 91
Staples and Branch Factories in Canadap. 97
NAFTAp. 101
Free Tradep. 101
Obstacles in Mexicop. 102
The Canada-United States Free Trade Agreementp. 103
A Dubious Election Prepares the Wayp. 104
Selling NAFTAp. 106
Disastrous Beginning in Mexicop. 109
Lessons from Puerto Ricop. 110
Transforming Mexican Agriculturep. 111
Economic Displacement and Migrationp. 114
Death and the Wallp. 116
Comparative Economic and Social Classesp. 119
Economic Classesp. 119
Managerial Power and Corruptionp. 128
Social Classesp. 131
Racial Contours of North Americap. 135
Racial Compositionsp. 135
Legacies of Slavery, War, and Colonialism in the United Statesp. 140
Mestizos, Indians, and Criollos in Mexicop. 144
Visible Minorities and First Peoples in Canadap. 147
Nationality and Ethnicityp. 148
A North American Social Model?p. 151
Power Structuresp. 151
Political Systemsp. 154
A North American Social Model?p. 157
Notesp. 163
Bibliographyp. 185
Indexp. 197
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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