Catalogue

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Ars nova : French and Italian music in the fourteenth century /
edited by John L. Nádas, Michael Scott Cuthbert.
imprint
Surrey, [England] ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2009.
description
xxiv, 569 p. : ill., music, facsims. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
075462708X (hbk.), 9780754627081 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Surrey, [England] ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2009.
isbn
075462708X (hbk.)
9780754627081 (hbk.)
language note
Mostly in English with one chapter in Italian.
catalogue key
6868331
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
The French polyphonic tradition of the fourteenth century blossomed earlier than the Italian, perhaps because of its long tradition of polyphony in previous centuries, many sources of which were being copied in the early 1300s. The contemporary view that a "new art" was being forged was formed by the theorists of the time such as Philippe de Vitry. The 27 articles brought together in this volume reflect a broad methodological and chronological span of analysis on the ars nova.
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
More so than for any other period in Western music of the past millennium, our collected knowledge of 14th-century music is contained in, and advanced through, scholarly articles. As yet, no monograph gathers the received opinions on style, composers and works of this period. This book attempts to redress the balance.
Long Description
The French polyphonic tradition of the fourteenth century blossomed earlier than the Italian, perhaps because of its long tradition of polyphony in previous centuries, many sources of which were being copied in the early 1300s. The contemporary view that a "new art" was being forged was formed by the theorists of the time such as Philippe de Vitry. He, along with Johannes de Muris, and the more conservative Jacques de Liège, popularized the idea of an ars nova, thereby being among the first musical thinkers to establish the music of the present as a clean break from that of the past. Contradictions and gaps in understanding abound in the ars nova of the fourteenth century (a period we usually expand until approximately 1420 when new ideas of song and Mass composition dominate post-Schism Europe), although these are well met by the ingenuity of the approaches and solutions found by scholars. The 27 articles brought together in this volume reflect a broad methodological and chronological span of analysis on the ars nova.
Main Description
In the early fourteenth century, musicians in France and later Italy established new traditions of secular and sacred polyphony. This ars nova, or new art, popularized by theorists such as Philippe de Vitry and Johannes de Muris was the among the first of many later movements to establish the music of the present as a clean break from the past. The twenty-seven articles brought together here reflect the broad methodological and chronological range of scholarly inquiry on the ars nova.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Periodization and Boundaries: Novelty and renewal in Italy: 1300-1600
Ars nova and stil novo
Magister Egardus and other Italo-Flemish contacts
Problems of dating in ars nova and ars subtilior
Sources: The ars nova fragments of Ghent
Music Theory: A phantom treatise of the 14th century?
The ars nova
Composers: Francesco Landini and the Florentine cultural elite
Gratiosus, Ciconia, and other musicians at Padua cathedral: some footnotes to present knowledge
Further notes on Magister Antonius dictus Zacharias de Teramo
Musicology, archives, and historiography
Literary Studies: Un leggiadretto velo' ed altre cose petrarchesche
Lyrics for reading and lyrics for singing in late medieval France: the development of the dance lyric from Adam de la Halle to Guillaume de Machaut
On text forms from Ciconia to Dufay
Leonardo Giustinian and quattrocento polyphonic song
Secular Song: New glimpses of an unwritten tradition
Improvisations in the madrigals of the Rossi codex
Landini's musical patrimony: a reassessment of some compositional conventions in trecento polyphony
Machaut's balades with 4 voices
Playing the citation game in the late 14th-century chanson
Sacred Music: The sacred polyphony of the Italian trecento
Zacara's D'amor Languire and strategies for borrowing in the early 15th-century Italian mass
Motets: The emergence of ars nova
Myth and mythography in the motets of Philippe de Vitry
Imitation in the ars nova and ars subtilior
Deception, exegesis and sounding number in Machaut's motet 15
Performance Practice: Machaut's 'pupil' Deschamps on the performance of music: voices or instruments in the 14th-century chanson
Texting in 15th-century French chansons: a look ahead from the 14th century
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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