Catalogue

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And grace will lead me home : African American freedmen communities of Austin, Texas, 1865-1928 /
Michelle M. Mears.
imprint
Lubbock, Tex. : Texas Tech University Press, 2009.
description
x, 233 p.
ISBN
0896726541 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780896726543 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lubbock, Tex. : Texas Tech University Press, 2009.
isbn
0896726541 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780896726543 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
The birth of Austin's urban freedmen communities -- Rural freedmen settlements near Austin -- The essentials of life in Austin's freedmen communities -- Freedmen culture and the amenities of life -- The death of Austin's freedmen communities.
abstract
"Focuses on the history of black freedmen communities in Austin, Texas, from 1865 to 1928. After emancipation at least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin and nearby rural settlements, disappearing by 1928. Covers the births and deaths of these communities; also describes the lives of those who lived there"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6866307
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"Focuses on the history of black freedmen communities in Austin, Texas, from 1865 to 1928. After emancipation at least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin and nearby rural settlements, disappearing by 1928. Covers the births and deaths of these communities; also describes the lives of those who lived there"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
After the Civil War ended in 1865, many freed slaves in central Texas began new lives in or near the capital city. At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby rural settlements, but most, for various reasons, had disappeared by 1928--when the city implemented a master plan that encouraged blacks to move into a single, racially-segregated section of town. Covering the births and deaths of these communities, And Grace Will Lead Me Home also illuminates what life was like for African Americans who lived there. Michelle M. Mears's careful combing of archival sources fleshes out life's amenities as well as the essentials of life for freedmen and their families.
Main Description
Glimpses of postCivil War life for freedmen in Texas's capital city
Table of Contents
Figuresp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 3
Background
Overview of Resources
The Birth of Austin's Urban Freedmen Communitiesp. 25
Rural Freedmen Settlements Near Austinp. 57
The Essentials of Life in Austin's Freedmen Communitiesp. 84
Work
Living Conditions
Food
Clothing Medicine
Housing
Safety
Freedmen Culture and the Amenities of Lifep. 107
Religion and Burial
Education
Leadership
Leisure
The Demise of Austin's Freedmen Communitiesp. 137
Conclusionsp. 154
Unearthing African American Historyp. 165
Appendicesp. 171
Summary of Austin's Urban Freedmen Communities
African American Employment According to the 1910 Austin Census
Travis County Slave Holders Owning More than Twenty Slaves in 1860
Summary of Austin's Rural Freedmen Communities
Occupations Listed for Austin's Freedmen in 1872 City Directory
Crimes Involving Freedmen in Austin, December 1883-October 1884
African American Deaths, December 1887-October 1897
Notesp. 189
Works Citedp. 211
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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