Catalogue


The inter-galactic playground : a critical study of children's and teens' science fiction /
Farah Mendlesohn.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
description
ix, 273 p.
ISBN
0786435038 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786435036 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
isbn
0786435038 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786435036 (softcover : alk. paper)
abstract
"This book considers the development of science fiction for children and teens between 1950 and 2010, exploring why it differs from science fiction aimed at adults. In a broader sense, this examination of 400 texts sheds light on changing attitudes toward children and teenagers, toward science education, and toward the authors' expectations and sociological views of their audience"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6862462
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Farah Mendlesohn teaches science fiction and fantasy literature at Middlesex University in London.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Hugo Awards, USA, 2010 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-11-01:
The primary premise of this provocative volume is that most contemporary writers of what is labeled children's and teens' science fiction do not play by the rules of adult science-fiction writing and therefore their work does not continue to draw these readers as they move into adulthood (as genres such as mystery do). Mendlesohn (Middlesex Univ., UK) contends, and nicely demonstrates, that this is because of the authors' misconceptions about the cognitive abilities of children and teenagers. As she states, people "are born into a science-fictional world and only slowly are allowed or encouraged to grow out of it. The reading of science fiction is not learned, it is unlearned." Mendlesohn discusses the various definitions of science fiction and considers the ways in which "adult anxieties have created a peculiarly technophobic future for children." Appendixes offer bibliographic suggestions and an extended look at children's picture books. All in all, this is an important evaluation of a mostly overlooked aspect of science fiction as a genre. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels. S. Raeschild Northern New Mexico College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Science fiction is often considered the genre of ideas and imagination, which would seem to make it ideal for juveniles and young adults; however, the ideas are often dispensed by adults. This book considers the development of science fiction for children and teens between 1950 and 2010, exploring why it differs from science fiction aimed at adults. In a broader sense, this critical examination of 400 texts sheds light on changing attitudes toward children and teenagers, toward science education, and toward the authors' expectations and sociological views of their audience.
Library of Congress Summary
"This book considers the development of science fiction for children and teens between 1950 and 2010, exploring why it differs from science fiction aimed at adults. In a broader sense, this examination of 400 texts sheds light on changing attitudes toward children and teenagers, toward science education, and toward the authors' expectations and sociological views of their audience"--Provided by publisher.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
What Do We Mean When We Say "Science Fiction"?p. 9
Red Herrings and Living-Room Elephants: How We Understand Children and Children's Readingp. 22
Science, Information Density and the SF Readerp. 49
Trajectories and Periodicity: Expectations of the Child in Science Fictionp. 83
Socialization and the Gendered (Future) Societyp. 112
You Gotta Have a Theme; or, the Paucity of Plotsp. 135
Best Practice Nowp. 175
Index to Out of this Worldp. 199
The Survey Questionnairep. 203
Analysis of the Survey, by Zara Baxter and Farah Mendlesohnp. 205
The Golden Age of Science Fiction Is Three: Science Fiction Picture Booksp. 228
Chapter Notesp. 243
Bibliographyp. 249
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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