Catalogue


Black feminist politics from Kennedy to Clinton /
Duchess Harris.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xv, 190 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230613306, 9780230613300
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230613306
9780230613300
contents note
A history of Black American feminism -- The 1990s in context : a history of Black women in American politics -- Black women's relationships with party politics -- Doubting the Democrats : current disenchantment and political futures.
catalogue key
6862427
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Duchess Harris, PhD, is an Associate Professor of American Studies at Macalester College. She is the co-editor with Bruce D. Baum of the forthcoming Racially Writing the Republic: Racists, Race Rebels, and Transformations of American Identity. She is also a J.D. candidate at William Mitchell College of Law.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-06-01:
American studies professor Harris (Macalester College) traces the history of leftist black feminist advocacy from 1960 until 2008 and the establishment of organizations such as the Combahee River Collective. The book offers a detailed account of how black women organized and identified themselves within the context of racism and black sexism in a capitalist society. Harris's main argument centers on black women's attempts to become part of the larger political and intellectual narrative and discourse and the ultimate limitations they faced in accomplishing this goal. She does not offer suggestions for change or a clearly delineated plan of action to attempt to achieve black women's goals to succeed in their continued effort to have their struggle against the multifaceted obstacles of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation recognized and adequately addressed by the dominant society. But then, that may not be the author's goal, which appears to aim more at contributing to an ongoing discussion than offering answers. Summing Up: Recommended. Senior undergraduate and graduate students. C. Warren Empire State College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"There has to be something said for being able to succeed in concisely communcating the issue of Black feminism and politics, but I think Duchess Harris has done just that." --Feminist Review"A detailed account of how black women organized and identified themselves within the context of racism and black sexism in a capitalist society."--CHOICE "I have been longing for a book that can conceptually interweave the legacy of the Combahee River Collective, the longstanding hostility by some in the black community toward the movie The Color Purple, and the political style of Congresswoman Barbara Lee.Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clintonoffers us a little known political history--it is required reading for any serious student and scholar of contemporary African American's women's political participation. This book provides readers a new and valuable conceptual landscape of how African American feminists have engaged electoral and cultural politics despite consistent and powerful opposition. What a refreshing and much needed addition!" --Michele Tracy Berger, Author of WorkableSisterhood: The Political Journey of Stigmatized Women with HIV/AIDS "Harris's analysis is both hopeful and disheartening. On the one hand, Harris provides oral, archival and literary histories of Black women without whom neither the Black Power nor the feminist movements would have progressed. On the other hand, Harris demonstrates that these movements, so beholden to Black women, have never adequately or fairly represented their needs and desires. Worse, they have too often asked Black women to choose between identities, prioritizing one over others." --Christine E. Hutchins,On the Issues Magazine
"There has to be something said for being able to succeed in concisely communcating the issue of Black feminism and politics, but I think Duchess Harris has done just that." --Feminist Review "I have been longing for a book that can conceptually interweave the legacy of the Combahee River Collective, the longstanding hostility by some in the black community toward the movie The Color Purple, and the political style of Congresswoman Barbara Lee.Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clintonoffers us a little known political history--it is required reading for any serious student and scholar of contemporary African American's women's political participation. This book provides readers a new and valuable conceptual landscape of how African American feminists have engaged electoral and cultural politics despite consistent and powerful opposition. What a refreshing and much needed addition!" --Michele Tracy Berger, Author of WorkableSisterhood: The Political Journey of Stigmatized Women with HIV/AIDS "Harris's analysis is both hopeful and disheartening. On the one hand, Harris provides oral, archival and literary histories of Black women without whom neither the Black Power nor the feminist movements would have progressed. On the other hand, Harris demonstrates that these movements, so beholden to Black women, have never adequately or fairly represented their needs and desires. Worse, they have too often asked Black women to choose between identities, prioritizing one over others." --Christine E. Hutchins,On the Issues Magazine
"There has to be something said for being able to succeed in concisely communcating the issue of Black feminism and politics, but I think Duchess Harris has done just that." -- Feminist Review "A detailed account of how black women organized and identified themselves within the context of racism and black sexism in a capitalist society." CHOICE "I have been longing for a book that can conceptually interweave the legacy of the Combahee River Collective, the longstanding hostility by some in the black community toward the movie The Color Purple, and the political style of Congresswoman Barbara Lee. Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clintonoffers us a little known political history--it is required reading for any serious student and scholar of contemporary African American's women's political participation. This book provides readers a new and valuable conceptual landscape of how African American feminists have engaged electoral and cultural politics despite consistent and powerful opposition. What a refreshing and much needed addition!" --Michele Tracy Berger, Author of Workable Sisterhood: The Political Journey of Stigmatized Women with HIV/AIDS "Harris's analysis is both hopeful and disheartening. On the one hand, Harris provides oral, archival and literary histories of Black women without whom neither the Black Power nor the feminist movements would have progressed. On the other hand, Harris demonstrates that these movements, so beholden to Black women, have never adequately or fairly represented their needs and desires. Worse, they have too often asked Black women to choose between identities, prioritizing one over others." --Christine E. Hutchins, On the Issues Magazine
'I have been longing for a book that can conceptually interweave the legacy of the Combahee River Collective, the longstanding hostility by some in the black community toward the movieTheColor Purple, and the political style of Congresswoman Barbara Lee.Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clintonoffers us a little known political history--it is required reading for any serious student and scholar of contemporary African American's women's political participation. This book provides readers a new and valuable conceptual landscape of how African American feminists have engaged electoral and cultural politics despite consistent and powerful opposition. What a refreshing and much needed addition!?--Michele Tracy Berger, Author ofWorkable Sisterhood: The Political Journey of Stigmatized Women with HIV/AIDS
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed. Harris demonstrates that Black women have tried to gain centrality through their participation in Presidential Commissions, Black feminist organizations, theatrical productions, film adaptations of literature, beauty pageants, electoral politics, and Presidential appointments. Harris& contends that 'success' in this area means that the feminist-identified Black women in the Congressional Black Caucus who voted against Clarence Thomas's appointment would have spoken on behalf of Anita Hill; Senator Carol Moseley Braun would have won re-election; Lani Gunier would have had a heÅ Dr. Joycelyn Elders would have maintained her post; and Congresswoman Barbara Lee wouldn't have stood alone in her opposition to the Iraq war resolution.
Description for Bookstore
Harris's book examines the intersection of race, gender, and electoral politics
Main Description
Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed.
Main Description
Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed. Harris demonstrates that Black women have tried to gain centrality through their participation in Presidential Commissions, Black feminist organizations, theatrical productions, film adaptations of literature, beauty pageants, electoral politics, and Presidential appointments. Harris contends that 'success' in this area means that the feminist-identified Black women in the Congressional Black Caucus who voted against Clarence Thomas's appointment would have spoken on behalf of Anita Hill; Senator Carol Moseley Braun would have won re-election; Lani Gunier would have had a heÅ Dr. Joycelyn Elders would have maintained her post; and Congresswoman Barbara Lee wouldn't have stood alone in her opposition to the Iraq war resolution.
Table of Contents
Series Editors' Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
List of Abbreviationsp. xviii
A History of Black American Feminismp. 1
The 1990s in Context: A History of Black Women in American Politicsp. 55
Black Women's Relationships with Party Politicsp. 89
Doubting the Democrats: Current Disenchantment and Political Futuresp. 135
Epiloguep. 149
Interview Questionsp. 157
Executive Order 1098 Establishing the President's Commission on the Status of Womenp. 161
Members of the President's Commission and Its Committees and Consultationsp. 165
Notesp. 179
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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