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The Third Reich in the ivory tower : complicity and conflict on American campuses /
Stephen H. Norwood.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, c2009.
description
xi, 339 p.
ISBN
052176243X (hardback), 9780521762434 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, c2009.
isbn
052176243X (hardback)
9780521762434 (hardback)
catalogue key
6862364
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
National Jewish Book Awards, USA, 2009 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-04-01:
Award-winning historian Norwood (Oklahoma) offers a carefully researched, tragic, infuriating account of reactions in US higher education to Nazi and Fascist persecution of Jews (most Semites are not Jews), 1933-39. His elegantly written, well-illustrated, tightly focused book emphasizes Ivy League, Seven Sisters, and a handful of other institutions. He highlights such events as the seizures of power by Hitler, Mussolini, and Franco, the Night of the Long Knives, the occupation of the Saar and Rhineland, Kristallnacht, the conquest of Ethiopia, and the baneful effects of US revisionist historians writing about injustices imposed on Germany after WW I. Norwood's theme is that US higher education (with its substrate of anti-Jewish prejudice) swallowed Axis propaganda into 1939, thereby influencing US public opinion when influence may actually have run in the opposite direction. Norwood ignores reactions among Lutheran and historically peace-related church institutions. He implies that morality is quantitative, not qualitative. His subject is important, his view micro rather than macro. People who like this kind of book will like this book. Inexplicably, no foreword or appreciations. Endnotes, somewhat thin bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above, but of limited interest. D. Steeples formerly, Mercer University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-06-01:
Norwood (history & Judaic studies, Univ. of Oklahoma) provides chilling insight into the relationship between the Nazi state and American Ivy League colleges during the 1930s. Schools such as Harvard and Columbia not only resisted calls to boycott Nazi Germany but actively engaged in what can best be described as pro-Nazi activities. In addition to institutional cooperation through student exchange programs, they invited high-level Nazis to speak on campus. Many Ivy Leaguers smugly asserted that the Nazi regime was good for Germany and discounted reports about Nazi persecution of Jews and the suppression of free speech. The intensity of anti-Semitic activity was dismissed by academics such as President Butler of Columbia as either a fabrication by American Jews, who he claimed controlled the media, or as a necessary policy to reduce overt Jewish influence in Germany. In addition, some female students and faculty at women's colleges, especially the elite Seven Sisters, justified Nazi gender discrimination and the curtailment of women's right to education. Verdict This disturbing study should be on the to-read list of anyone interested in pre-World War II America.-Frederic Krome, Univ. of Cincinnati Clermont Coll. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"a carefully detailed and devastating written indictment of many of our nation's college leaders."-Les Kinsolving, WorldNetDaily
"[A] disheartening history lesson. Norwood . . . knock[s] down one myth and then knock[s] down another. . . . that American Jews were silent and passive in regard to Nazism [and] that American universities . . . could be counted on to stand up for democratic ideals and human rights."-Jerusalem Report
"already flaming controversies and debate. . . . [a] seminal study. . . . Norwood's book is a must read."-Steven Plaut, Front Page Magazine
'An excellent and frightening book about the friendly hand extended prior to World War II by major U.S. universities and colleges to Nazi Germany and its European allies. American academics and their institutions flattered Hitler and his regime, minimized their crimes, and encouraged appeasement. A must-read also for those who want to understand the mechanisms that generate antisemitism and prejudice on American campuses today.' Radu Ioanid, author of The Holocaust in Romania
"In this thoroughly researched work on the nature and extent of sympathy with Nazi Germany at American universities during the 1930's, Stephen Norwood helps readers understand pre-World War II conditions from an international perspective." -Jewish Book World
"make[s] a compelling case that [university] presidents dozed, dithered, and ducked during the great and gathering storm of Nazism."-Boston Sunday Globe
"Norwood has opened the door so that American colleges and universities can be exposed for allowing Hitler and the Nazis to slaughter Jews with reckless abandon."-Jerusalem Post
"Norwood's tome, which shows how influential many American universities were in creating sympathy for Nazi Germany, helps explain the shocking survey among incoming freshmen at Princeton University in New Jersey in 1938 in which Hitler polled as the 'greatest living person.'" -Hadassah Magazine
"Professor Norwood . . . provides a comprehensive recounting-and persuasive indictment-of the reprehensible behavior of American colleges and universities and their leaders during the Nazi era."-Jerold S. Auerbach, Society
"Professor Norwood's book should be assigned in every college in America."-Rebecca Bynum, New English Review
Reviews of the hardback: 'Stephen Norwood's groundbreaking research and eloquent pen have added immeasurably to our understanding of how Americans responded to Nazism in the 1930s. The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower reveals a painful but important chapter in our nation's history.' David S. Wyman, author of The Abandonment of the Jews
"Stephen H. Norwood forcefully demonstrates [that] . . . some of America's top universities adopted a hear-no-evil attitude toward Hitler's Germany that bordered on complicity."-Ari Goldman, Columbia Magazine
"Stephen H. Norwoods The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower: Complicity and Conflict on American Campuses massively demonstrates how these professors...were themselves made respectable in America during the Nazi regime's formative years by the faculty and administrators of major American universities and colleges." -Edward Alexander, Chicago Jewish Star
"Stephen H. Norwood . . . traces, in his compelling The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower, a chilling pattern in the Ivy League and the Seven Sisters, as well as in some state universities and Catholic colleges. From callous indifference to the rise of Hitlerism . . . to concrete instances of complicity with the Nazi regime . . . Norwood provides an indictment of Hitler sympathizers in power at the heart of American education. . . . fascinating to the general reader. . . . [and] an invaluable resource to scholars as well."-Forward
'Stephen Norwood's groundbreaking research and eloquent pen have added immeasurably to our understanding of how Americans responded to Nazism in the 1930s. The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower reveals a painful but important chapter in our nation's history.' David S. Wyman, author of The Abandonment of the Jews
"Stephen Norwood's groundbreaking research and eloquent pen have added immeasurably to our understanding of how Americans responded to Nazism in the 1930s. The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower reveals a painful but important chapter in our nation's history." - David S. Wyman, author of The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945
"the first study of how a crucially important segment of American society responded to the Nazis."-Sueddeutsche Zeitung
"The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower depicts in stunning detail how, in the 1930's, when the Nazi regime was intent on winning international legitmacy, it received a significant boost from America's leading academic institutions..." -American Jewish History, Deborah E. Lipstadt
'The Third Reich in the Ivory Tower provides the first comprehensive examination of the response of major American universities to the ethical and professional challenges posed by the Nazi regime. Through a methodical marshaling of evidence, Professor Norwood demonstrates that university administrators reacted with both temerity, in maintaining ties to German institutions long after the Nazi influence was clear, and timidity, in refusing to protest Nazi outrages on either academic or moral grounds. In doing so, he exposes the prejudices and predilections that shaped the American academy in the twentieth century.' Laurel Leff, Northeastern University School of Journalism and and author of Buried by The Times
'This pioneering work by an accomplished scholar contains much that will be new and compelling to both historians and the general reader. Well-organized and gracefully written, it is a significant work that systematically exposes and analyzes the tangled and often sordid responses of American universities to Nazism. Norwood's research is deep and wide, drawing on evidence from a very broad range of often untapped sources. This study will be essential reading for scholars of Nazism, antisemitism, appeasement, higher education, the American Jewish experience, the 1930s student movement, free speech, and even gender history. The study should also have considerable appeal to the educated public.' Steven Katz, Boston University
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2009
Choice, April 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work explores the sympathy for Nazi Germany at American universities during the 1930s. It contrasts the significant American grass-roots protest against Nazism with campus quiescence and administrators' frequently harsh treatment of those students and professors who challenged their friendly relations with Nazi Germany.
Description for Bookstore
This is the first systematic exploration of the nature and extent of sympathy for Nazi Germany at American universities during the 1930s. Norwood contrasts the significant American grass-roots protest against Nazism that emerged as soon as Hitler assumed power with campus quiescence.
Main Description
In this disturbing book, Norwood exposes the moral failings of American educators who helped the Nazis improve their image in the West as they intensified their persecution of the Jews and strengthened their armed forces.
Main Description
This is the first systematic exploration of the nature and extent of sympathy for Nazi Germany at American universities during the 1930s. Universities were highly influential in shaping public opinion and many of the nation's most prominent university administrators refused to take a principled stand against the Hitler regime. Universities welcomed Nazi officials to campus and participated enthusiastically in student exchange programs with Nazified universities in Germany. American educators helped Nazi Germany improve its image in the West as it intensified its persecution of the Jews and strengthened its armed forces. The study contrasts the significant American grass-roots protest against Nazism that emerged as soon as Hitler assumed power with campus quiescence, and administrators' frequently harsh treatment of those students and professors who challenged their determination to maintain friendly relations with Nazi Germany.
Table of Contents
Figuresp. vi
Abbreviationsp. ix
Germany Reverts to the Dark Ages: Nazi Clarity and Grassroots American Protest, 1933-1934p. 1
Legitimating Nazism: Harvard University and the Hitler Regime, 1933-1937p. 36
Complicity and Conflict: Columbia University's Response to Fascism, 1933-1937p. 75
The Seven Sisters Colleges and the Third Reich: Promoting Fellowship Through Student Exchangep. 103
A Respectful Hearing for Nazi Germany's Apologists: The University of Virginia Institute of Public Affairs Roundtables, 1933-1941p. 133
Nazi Nests: German Departments in American Universities, 1933-1941p. 158
American Catholic Universities' Flirtation with Fascismp. 196
1938, Year of the Kristallnacht: The Limits of Campus Protestp. 220
Epiloguep. 243
Notesp. 257
Bibliographyp. 305
Indexp. 317
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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