Catalogue


Early cinema and the "national" /
edited by Richard Abel, Giorgio Bertellini and Rob King.
imprint
New Barnet, Herts : John Libbey ; Bloomington, IN : Distributed in North America by Indiana University Press, c2008.
description
vi, 354 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0861966899 (pbk.), 9780861966899 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Barnet, Herts : John Libbey ; Bloomington, IN : Distributed in North America by Indiana University Press, c2008.
isbn
0861966899 (pbk.)
9780861966899 (pbk.)
general note
"... the ninth International Domitor Conference, held at the University of Michigan (30 May-2 June 2006)"--P. 2.
catalogue key
6855272
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-01-01:
Abel (Univ. of Michigan), Bertellini (Univ. of Michigan), and King (Univ. of Toronto) are all specialists in the field of early cinema. Here they bring together 34 essays by as many historians to tackle a big subject, namely, how motion pictures in the first two decades of the 20th century constructed "communities of nationality." As historian Tom Gunning suggests in his essay, cinema was international before it was national, and "cinema's relation to both global and national discourses arose in the first decades of the twentieth century." The sheer scope and variety of subject matter (not to mention the microscopic size of the text font) is daunting. Technological change, geopolitical contexts, exhibition and marketing practices, inter-titling, and colonial/imperialistic considerations are only a few ingredients in this Dagwood sandwich of a book. Best begun with modest nibbles, it eventually proves to be a bountiful repast of meditations on what Abel calls "national imaginaries" as overlapping components: geographical origin, the imagined sense of belonging, cultural cliches, and/or constructed images. The editors declare the "rethinkings" in this book are "profoundly relevant [in this] era of newly globalized capitalism, mass migrations of peoples across borders, and deceptive imperialist adventures." Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. J. C. Tibbetts University of Kansas
Reviews
Review Quotes
... has 34 authors of as many chapters that consider the nation state as a framing category for writing cinema history.
"... has 34 authors of as many chapters that consider the nation state as a framing category for writing cinema history." -- Bruce A. Austin, COMMUNICATION BOOKNOTES Q, Vol. 40.3 July-Sept. 2009
"... has 34 authors of as many chapters that consider the nation state as a framing category for writing cinema history." -Bruce A. Austin, COMMUNICATION BOOKNOTES Q, Vol. 40.3 July-Sept. 2009
Abel (Univ. of Michigan), Bertellini (Univ. of Michigan), and King (Univ. of Toronto) are all specialists in the field of early cinema. Here they bring together 34 essays by as many historians to tackle a big subject, namely, how motion pictures in the first two decades of the 20th century constructed 'communities of nationality.' As historian Tom Gunning suggests in his essay, cinema was international before it was national, and 'cinema's relation to both global and national discourses arose in the first decades of the twentieth century.' The sheer scope and variety of subject matter (not to mention the microscopic size of the text font) is daunting. Technological change, geopolitical contexts, exhibition and marketing practices, inter-titling, and colonial/imperialistic considerations are only a few ingredients in this Dagwood sandwich of a book. Best begun with modest nibbles, it eventually proves to be a bountiful repast of meditations on what Abel calls 'national imaginaries' as overlapping components: geographical origin, the imagined sense of belonging, cultural clich s, and/or constructed images. The editors declare the 'rethinkings' in this book are 'profoundly relevant [in this] era of newly globalized capitalism, mass migrations of peoples across borders, and deceptive imperialist adventures.' Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. -- ChoiceJ. C. Tibbetts, University of Kansas, Jan. 2010
Abel (Univ. of Michigan), Bertellini (Univ. of Michigan), and King (Univ. of Toronto) are all specialists in the field of early cinema. Here they bring together 34 essays by as many historians to tackle a big subject, namely, how motion pictures in the first two decades of the 20th century constructed 'communities of nationality.' As historian Tom Gunning suggests in his essay, cinema was international before it was national, and 'cinema's relation to both global and national discourses arose in the first decades of the twentieth century.' The sheer scope and variety of subject matter (not to mention the microscopic size of the text font) is daunting. Technological change, geopolitical contexts, exhibition and marketing practices, inter-titling, and colonial/imperialistic considerations are only a few ingredients in this Dagwood sandwich of a book. Best begun with modest nibbles, it eventually proves to be a bountiful repast of meditations on what Abel calls 'national imaginaries' as overlapping components: geographical origin, the imagined sense of belonging, cultural clich├ęs, and/or constructed images. The editors declare the 'rethinkings' in this book are 'profoundly relevant [in this] era of newly globalized capitalism, mass migrations of peoples across borders, and deceptive imperialist adventures.' Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. -- ChoiceJ. C. Tibbetts, University of Kansas, Jan. 2010
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
How nations learned to visualize themselves through moving images
Main Description
While many studies have been written on national cinemas, Early Cinema and the "National" is the first anthology to focus on the concept of national film culture from a wide methodological spectrum of interests, including not only visual and narrative forms, but also international geopolitics, exhibition and marketing practices, and pressing linkages to national imageries. The essays in this richly illustrated, landmark anthology are devoted to reconsidering the nation as a framing category for writing cinema history. Many of the 34 contributors show that concepts of a national identity played a role in establishing the parameters of cinema's early development, from technological change to discourses of stardom, from emerging genres to intertitling practices. Yet, as others attest, national meanings could often become knotty in other contexts, when concepts of nationhood were contested in relation to colonial/imperial histories and regional configurations. Early Cinema and the "National" takes stock of a formative moment in cinema history, tracing the beginnings of the process whereby nations learned to imagine themselves through moving images.
Table of Contents
Interrogating the National
Early cinema as global cinema: The encyclopedic ambition
Nationalizing attractions
Images of the National in early non-fiction films
National and racial landscapes and the photographic form
Sound-on-disc:Cinema and Electrification in Britain, France, Germany, and the United States
Mind-reading/mind-speaking: Dialogue inThe Birth of a Nation(1915) and the emergence of speech in American silent cinema
Living Canada: Selling the Nation throughImages
Early cinema and the Polish question
Colonialism/Imperialism
Our Navyand patriotic entertainment in Brighton at the start of the Boer War
An England of our Dreams?: Early Patriotic Entertainments with Film in Britain during the Anglo-Boer War
The transport of audiences: making cinema National
Enlisting early cinema in the service of la plus grande France
Teaching citizenship via celluloid
Fights of Nationsand national fights
Japan onAmerican screens, 1908-1915
Locating/Relocating the National in Film Exhibition
Nationalist film-going without Canadian-made films?
The cinema arrives inItaly: city, region and nation in early film discourse
Wondrous pictures in Istanbul: from cosmopolitanism to nationalism
The emergence of nationally specific film cultures in Europe, 1911-1914
The Norwegian municipal cinema system and the development of a national cinema
Spanish lecturers and their relations with the national
Joseph Dumais and the language of French-Canadian silent cinema
Localizing serials: Translating daily life inLes Mysteres de New-York(1915)
Genre and the National24 Amanda Keeler ? Seeing the world while staying at home: slapstick, modernity and American-ness
A Purely American Product: tramp comedy and white working-class formation in the 1910s
The Chinese conjurer: orientalist magic in variety theater and the trick film
A note on the national character of early popular science films
European melodramas and World War I: narrated time and historical time as reflections of national identity
Cow-punchers, bull-whackers and tin horn gamblers: generic formulae, sensational literature, and early American cinema
Early ethnographic film and the museum
Black hair, black eyes, black heart: Theda Bara and race suicide panic
Who is the right star to adore? Nationality, masculinity and the female cinema audience in Germany during World War I
Memory, Imagination, and the National
From Switzerland to Italy and all around the world: the Joseph Joye and Davide Turconi collections
The imagination of early Hollywood: movie-land and the magic cities, 1914-1916
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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