Catalogue


Performing conquest : five centuries of theater, history, and identity in Tlaxcala, Mexico /
Patricia A. Ybarra.
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, 2009.
description
x, 271 p.
ISBN
0472116797 (cloth : acid-free paper), 9780472116799 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, 2009.
isbn
0472116797 (cloth : acid-free paper)
9780472116799 (cloth : acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction: Gracias, güerito, and don't forget the bastones! -- Motolinía's site of complicity -- Playing Indian in Tlaxcala -- Producing mestizaje and its discontents -- Entries and exits into neoliberal Mexico -- Performing the exceptional historian in Saltillo, Mexico -- Conclusion: playing by the rules in contemporary Mexican politics.
catalogue key
6850973
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-10-01:
A decade or so of research and on-site observation of Tlaxcalan theatrical activity undergird this insightful study by Ybarra (Brown Univ.). Since the Spaniards began their conquest in 1519, the state of Tlaxcala has considered itself exceptional within the history of Mexico. Reenactments of historical events have contributed to revisions of that history and even at times have inscribed Tlaxcalan culture as representative of the whole of Mexico. Ybarra's ability to challenge her own assumptions takes the journey in some unexpected directions, yet she brings a remarkable coherence to subjects that include 16th-century Corpus Christi processions and colonialist drama, appropriations of the legend of Xicotencatl as local hero or exemplar, 1930s plays by Miguel Lira about mixed native and European heritage, ethnic dance forms, contemporary political performance, and a historical pageant begun in 1981. Though the writing is lucid, the content may be overtheorized for less experienced readers. A dozen photographs and 65 pages of notes, bibliography, and index are included. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and researchers. F. H. Londre University of Missouri-Kansas City
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
"A new and important analysis of the ways in which plays, festivals, pageants and political events have long exhibited public conformity while, at times, critiquing and challenging their own performance. It will be enthusiastically received by those who study performance, Latin America, and resistance movements." ---Diana Taylor, New York University Tlaxcala is unique among the states of Mexico. Because of its fierce independence during the pre-Columbian era (it was never conquered by the Aztecs) and its strategic alliance with the Spanish invaders in Cortez's conquest in the early sixteenth century, Tlaxcala has played a significant role in Mexican history. Performing Conquest examines the distinct Tlaxcalan identity that has evolved over the last five centuries and the way that performance---especially political speech---has been inextricably linked to its creation. The book focuses on theatrical performances, political events, texts that "perform" despite themselves, and state-sponsored performances designed to foment local and/or national identity. The theatrical strategies included the re-imagination of civic space, the combination of aural, oral, and visual means of communication to create meaning, and the blurring of the line between representation and reality, which made everyday citizens into "actors" in their spectacles. Performing Conquest shows not only that these strategies were deeply embedded cultural practices, learned from and developed within religious conversion plays, political entry ceremonies, festival displays, tragic hero dramas, and state-sponsored patriotic pageants, but also that they transformed at crucial historical moments in response to various wars, national cultural policies, and debt crises. Patricia A. Ybarra is Assistant Professor of Theater, Speech, and Dance at Brown University.
Main Description
"A new and important analysis of the ways in which plays, festivals, pageants and political events have long exhibited public conformity while, at times, critiquing and challenging their own performance. It will be enthusiastically received by those who study performance, Latin America, and resistance movements." ---Diana Taylor, New York University Tlaxcala is unique among the states of Mexico. Because of its fierce independence during the pre-Columbian era (it was never conquered by the Aztecs) and its strategic alliance with the Spanish invaders in Cortez's conquest in the early sixteenth century, Tlaxcala has played a significant role in Mexican history.Performing Conquestexamines the distinct Tlaxcalan identity that has evolved over the last five centuries and the way that performance---especially political speech---has been inextricably linked to its creation. The book focuses on theatrical performances, political events, texts that "perform" despite themselves, and state-sponsored performances designed to foment local and/or national identity. The theatrical strategies included the re-imagination of civic space, the combination of aural, oral, and visual means of communication to create meaning, and the blurring of the line between representation and reality, which made everyday citizens into "actors" in their spectacles.Performing Conquestshows not only that these strategies were deeply embedded cultural practices, learned from and developed within religious conversion plays, political entry ceremonies, festival displays, tragic hero dramas, and state-sponsored patriotic pageants, but also that they transformed at crucial historical moments in response to various wars, national cultural policies, and debt crises. Patricia A. Ybarra is Assistant Professor of Theater, Speech, and Dance at Brown University.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Because of its strategic alliance with the Spanish invaders in Cortez's conquest in the early 16th century, Tlaxcala has played a significant role in Mexican history. This book examines the distinct Tlaxcalan identity that has evolved over the last five centuries and the way that performance has been linked to its creation.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Gracias, Guerito, and Don't Forget the Bastones!p. 1
Motolinia's Site of Complicityp. 34
Playing Indian in Tlaxcalap. 68
Producing Mestizaje and Its Discontentsp. 104
Entries and Exits into Neoliberal Mexicop. 134
Performing the Exceptional Historian in Saltillo, Mexicop. 163
Conclusion: Playing by the Rules in Contemporary Mexican Politicsp. 195
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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