Catalogue


Greek resurrection beliefs and the success of Christianity /
Dag Øistein Endsjø.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
x, 274 p.
ISBN
0230617298, 9780230617292
format(s)
Book
Subjects
geographic term
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230617298
9780230617292
contents note
Introduction: Dilemmas of the flesh -- Where do we stand? -- Explanations so far -- Judaism, Greek philosophy, and that third factor -- The attraction of immortal flesh -- The general attraction of the flesh -- Mortal souls, annihilated bodies -- The heroes, the fortunate dead -- The immortal nature of the gods -- The possibility of immortal flesh -- Resuscitation to a normal life -- Dismemberment and rejuvenation -- Resurrection and physical immortality -- Becoming immortal by merely touching death -- Achieving immortality through death -- The gods who were not resurrected -- A question of space -- Swept away to immortality -- When the earth opens up -- Immortal misery -- A body vanishes -- What did the Christians say? -- New beliefs, old beliefs -- When the soul became immortal (according to some) -- Confusion and contradictions -- The state of the afterlife at the dawn of Christianity -- Jewish beliefs on the afterlife -- The challenge of immortal flesh -- The fleshless resurrection body of Paul -- The Corinthian riddle -- The Greek context of Corinth -- Ridicule at the Aareopagus -- The requirement of physical continuity -- The success of immortal flesh -- The vanished resurrection body of Mark -- The tangible resurrection body of Matthew -- Luke's resurrection body of flesh and bones -- The pierced resurrection body of John -- More emphasis on the flesh -- The ever-present alternative of a fleshless resurrection -- How the struggle between philosophers and multitude continued within Christianity -- The promise of the flesh and the dilemma of annihilation -- The divine recreation of the flesh -- Answers to the challenge of the flesh -- Immortal flesh and why the Greeks left Zeus.
catalogue key
6850828
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dag ophi;istein Endsjophi; is Associate Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Bergen, Norway, specializing in Greek religion and early Christianity.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a lively, highly enjoyable, scholarly, and innovative book considering the theme of Greek ideas about bodily resurrection in the light of the Gospel traditions. The author is to be commended for covering such demanding ground with such a light touch. The work will be an important addition to the literature, and should be required reading in New Testament departments, as well as being equally valuable in schools of Classics and Ancient History. This is a timely and important study. "--Rev. Dr. John Anthony McGuckin, Nielsen Professor in Late Antique and Byzantine Christian History, Union Theological Seminary, and Professor of Byzantine Christian Studies, Columbia University
"This is a lively, highly enjoyable, scholarly, and innovative book considering the theme of Greek ideas about bodily resurrection in the light of the Gospel traditions. The author is to be commended for covering such demanding ground with such a light touch. The work will be an important addition to the literature, and should be required reading in New Testament departments, as well as being equally valuable in schools of Classics and Ancient History. This is a timely and important study. " - Rev. Dr. John Anthony McGuckin, Nielsen Professor in Late Antique and Byzantine Christian History, Union Theological Seminary, and Professor of Byzantine Christian Studies, Columbia University "This research project is completely new and unique. In his remarkable and well-written monograph, Endsjo proposes nothing less than new general hypotheses of Greek, Jewish, and Christian eschatology and their interrelations. I am deeply impressed by the creative force of his original redefinition. With his innovative approach to analyzing the connection between Greek, Jewish, and Early Christian views on resurrection and immortality, Endsjo forces his readers to reconsider the whole issue." - Per Bilde, Aarhus University, Denmark in Numen 58 (2011)
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the relationship between the growth of Christianity in Greece and the belief in resurrection from the dead.
Main Description
This book examines the relationship between the breakthrough of Christianity in antiquity and the belief in the resurrection of the flesh. Traditionally, Greek religion entailed a strong and enduring conviction that immortality always had to include both a body of flesh and a soul. Both mythical and historical persons were also believed to have been resurrected from the dead and become physically immortal. The Christian belief in the resurrection of the flesh evolved only gradually, beginning with Paul, who simply denied it. But the more popular Christianity became among the Greeks, the stronger the emphasis became on the resurrection of the flesh; and the more Christianity stressed physical incorruptibility, the more Greeks left their ancient beliefs for this new religion. As such, the traditional Greek longing for immortal flesh can be seen as an important catalyst for the success of Christianity.
Main Description
This book examines the relationship between the growth of Christianity in Greece and the belief in resurrection from the dead. Traditionally, Greek religion held a strong and enduring conviction that immorality always had to include both body and soul. Both mythical and historical persons were also believed to have been resurrected from the dead and become physically immortal. The Christian belief in the resurrection of the flesh evolved only gradually, beginning with Paul who simply denied it. But the more popular Christianity became among the Greeks, the stronger the emphasis became on the resurrection of the flesh; the more Christianity stressed physical incorruptibility, the more Greeks left their ancient beliefs for this new religion. As such, the success of Christianity may also be seen in connection with how it responded to the traditional Greek longing for immortal flesh.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text examines the relationship between the growth of Christianity in Greece and the belief in resurrection from the dead. It gives a clear presentation of various generally unknown aspects about traditional Greek religion.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Dilemmas of the Fleshp. 1
Where Do We Stand?p. 9
The Attraction of Immortal Fleshp. 21
The Possibility of Immortal Fleshp. 47
New Beliefs, Old Beliefsp. 105
Jewish Beliefs on the Afterlifep. 121
The Challenge of Immortal Fleshp. 141
The Success of Immortal Fleshp. 159
Notesp. 219
Bibliographyp. 253
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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