Catalogue


The working-class intellectual in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain /
edited by Aruna Krishnamurthy.
imprint
Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2009.
description
ix, 257 p.
ISBN
0754665046 (alk. paper), 9780754665045 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2009.
isbn
0754665046 (alk. paper)
9780754665045 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6845390
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
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Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2009
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Summaries
Long Description
The period that stretches from the middle of the eighteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century in England has often been examined in terms of the emergence of the working classes, alongside and in response to the development of the middle-class 'public sphere'. This collection of essays contributes to that scholarship by filtering the formation of working-class identity through the rise of the 'working-class intellectual', a unique cultural figure at the crossroads of two disparate worlds. As the contributors examine how the working-class intellectual both assimilates the anti-authoritarian lexicon of the middle classes to create a new political and cultural identity, and revolutionizes it with the subversive energy of class hostility, we see that this figure generates double-edged narratives of defiance and deference that can be traced back to the 1730s, when thresher Stephen Duck made the first bold entry into the literary marketplace with his 'The Thresher's Labour'. Covering a broad range of figures, writings, and genres as they move through the key moments of working-class self-expression such as the 1790s and the period from the 1830s to the 1850, the essays consider a host of familiar figures such as Robert Burns, John Thelwall, Charles Dickens, Charles Kingsley, Ann Yearsley, and even Shakespeare, all re-evaluated in terms of their role within a working-class constituency. Further, the collection breaks fresh ground in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century scholarship by shedding light on a number of unfamiliar and underrepresented figures, such as Thomas Cooper, Alexander Somerville, Michael Faraday, and the singer Ned Corvan.
Long Description
In Britain, the period that stretches from the middle of the eighteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century marks the emergence of the working classes, alongside and in response to the development of the middle-class public sphere. This collection contributes to that scholarship by exploring the figure of the working-class intellectual, who both assimilates the anti-authoritarian lexicon of the middle classes to create a new political and cultural identity, and revolutionizes it with the subversive energy of class hostility. Through considering a broad range of writings across key moments of working-class self-expression, the essays reevaluate a host of familiar writers such as Robert Burns, John Thelwall, Charles Dickens, Charles Kingsley, Ann Yearsley, and even Shakespeare, in terms of their role within a working-class constituency. The collection also breaks fresh ground in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century scholarship by shedding light on a number of unfamiliar and underrepresented figures, such as Alexander Somerville, Michael Faraday, and the singer Ned Corvan.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Covering a broad range of figures, writings and genres as they move through the key moments of working-class self-expression, these essays consider a host of familiar figures such as Robert Burns, John Thelwall, Charles Dickens, Charles Kingsley, and even Shakespeare, all re-evaluated in terms of their role within a working-class constituency.

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