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The environmental justice : William O. Douglas and American conservation /
Adam M. Sowards.
imprint
Corvallis : Oregon State University Press, 2009.
description
x, 198 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0870715674 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780870715679 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Corvallis : Oregon State University Press, 2009.
isbn
0870715674 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780870715679 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : a public intellectual for conservation -- Roots and reputation -- Roads to protest -- Toward a wilderness Bill of Rights -- Committees of correspondence -- The environmental justice -- Conclusion : transitions and legacies.
catalogue key
6845354
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-190) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Adam M. Sowards is a professor of history at the University of Idaho. He holds a Ph.D in history from Arizona State University and is the author of United States West Coast: An Environmental History.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
From the late 1940s to the mid-1970s, American conservation politics underwent a transformation—and Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (1898-1980) was at the heart of this shift toward modern environmentalism. The Environmental Justice explores how Douglas, inspired by his youthful experiences hiking in the Pacific Northwest, eventually used his influence to contribute to American conservation thought, politics, and law.
Flap Copy
From the late 1940s to the mid-1970s, American conservation politics underwent a transformation and Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (1898-1980) was at the heart of this shift toward modern environmentalism. The Environmental Justice explores how Douglas, inspired by his youthful experiences hiking in the Pacific Northwest, eventually used his influence to contribute to American conservation thought, politics, and law.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-03-01:
The term "activist judge" came into vogue after Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas left the bench in 1975. Yet it was he who came truly to define the term after FDR appointed him to the high court in 1939. In his defense of individual and minority rights, Douglas was without peer over the course of his lengthy career. Few realize today, however, that he brought that same judicial philosophy to the fields of environmental justice and wilderness protection. As Sowards (history, Univ. of Idaho) notes, "[a]s a sitting Supreme Court justice, Douglas brought prestige to the conservation crusades of the time and enormous symbolic power of legal authority at a time when the nation's laws did not favor environmental protection" (p. 4). A native of the Pacific Northwest, Douglas rarely turned down speaking or writing invitations about the desperate need for Washington policy makers to commit to the conservation of the US's natural resources. Douglas played a critical (though necessarily behind-the-scenes) role in helping coordinate lobbying efforts by various conservation organizations in numerous environmental regulatory debates of the 1960s-70s. Extensive primary source research and photos supplement the work. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. Edgerton Montana State University at Billings
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
From the late 1940s to the mid-1970s, American conservation politics underwent a transformation—and Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (1898-1980) was at the heart of this shift toward modern environmentalism. The Environmental Justice explores how Douglas, inspired by his youthful experiences hiking in the Pacific Northwest, eventually used his influence to contribute to American conservation thought, politics, and law. Justice Douglas was one of the nation’s most passionate conservationists. He led public protests in favor of wilderness near Washington, D.C., along Washington State’s Pacific coast, and many places in between. He wrote eloquent testimonies to the value of wilderness and society’s increasing need for it, both in his popular books and in his heartfelt judicial opinions celebrating nature and condemning those who would destroy it. He worked tirelessly to secure stronger legal protections for the environment, coordinating with a national network of conservationists and policymakers. As a sitting Supreme Court Justice, Douglas brought prestige to the conservation crusades of the time and the enormous symbolic power of legal authority at a time when the nation’s laws did not favor environmental protection. He understood the need for national solutions that included public involvement and protections of minority interests; the issues were nationally important and the forces against preservation were strong. In myriad situations Douglas promoted democratic action for conservation, public monitoring of government and business activities, and stronger laws to ensure environmental and political integrity. His passion for the environment helped to shape the modern environmental movement. For the first time, The Environmental Justice tells this story.
Main Description
From the late 1940s to the mid-1970s, American conservation politics underwent a transformation and Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (1898-1980) was at the heart of this shift toward modern environmentalism. The Environmental Justice explores how Douglas, inspired by his youthful experiences hiking in the Pacific Northwest, eventually used his influence to contribute to American conservation thought, politics, and law. Justice Douglas was one of the nation's most passionate conservationists. He led public protests in favor of wilderness near Washington, D.C., along Washington State's Pacific coast, and many places in between. He wrote eloquent testimonies to the value of wilderness and society's increasing need for it, both in his popular books and in his heartfelt judicial opinions celebrating nature and condemning those who would destroy it. He worked tirelessly to secure stronger legal protections for the environment, coordinating with a national network of conservationists and policymakers. As a sitting Supreme Court Justice, Douglas brought prestige to the conservation crusades of the time and the enormous symbolic power of legal authority at a time when the nation's laws did not favor environmental protection. He understood the need for national solutions that included public involvement and protections of minority interests; the issues were nationally important and the forces against preservation were strong. In myriad situations Douglas promoted democratic action for conservation, public monitoring of government and business activities, and stronger laws to ensure environmental and political integrity. His passion for the environment helped to shape the modern environmental movement. For the first time, The Environmental Justice tells this story.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
p. 1
Roots and Reputationp. 9
Roads to Protestp. 31
Toward a Wilderness Bill of Rightsp. 58
Committees of Correspondencep. 81
The Environmental Justicep. 112
Conclusion: Transitions and Legaciesp. 138
Notesp. 148
Bibliographyp. 179
Indexp. 192
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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