Catalogue


A very mutinous people : the struggle for North Carolina, 1660-1713 /
Noeleen McIlvenna.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press c2009.
description
x, 212 p.
ISBN
0807832863 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807832868 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press c2009.
isbn
0807832863 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807832868 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
pt. 1. The first generation -- Escape to the swamp, 1660-1663 -- Building the sanctuary, 1664-1673 -- Culpeper's Rebellion, 1673-1680 -- The rise and fall of Seth Sothell, 1681-1695 -- pt. 2. The second generation -- Challenge of the Anglicans I : church establishment, 1695-1707 -- Challenge of the Anglicans II : Native American resistance, 1695-1707 -- Cary's Rebellion, 1708-1711 -- One final fight for freedom, 1711-1713.
catalogue key
6837552
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An intriguing interpretation of Albemarle's tumultuous early years. . . . An important addition to the historiography of North Carolina and that surrounding the rise of the planter class." - Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
"An intriguing interpretation of Albemarle's tumultuous early years. . . . An important addition to the historiography of North Carolina and that surrounding the rise of the planter class." -Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
"Creatively utilizing an array of period accounts, McIlvenna reexamines this often-overlooked part of the Carolinas and convincingly argues a bold new interpretation of the Albemarle." - The Georgia Historical Quarterly
"McIlvenna . . . weave[s] together a vivid and coherent narrative of the political struggles that transformed the colony. . . . Introduces an insubordinate and defiant world previously overlooked by colonial historians." - North Carolina Historical Review
"McIlvenna . . . weave[s] together a vivid and coherent narrative of the political struggles that transformed the colony. . . . Introduces an insubordinate and defiant world previously overlooked by colonial historians." -North Carolina Historical Review
"This well-written volume is highly recommended. McIlvenna successfully integrates this little-known society into a wider Atlantic world and explains the meaningful ways that early North Carolina was truly different from its hierarchical neighbors." -- The Journal of American History
"This well-written volume is highly recommended. McIlvenna successfully integrates this little-known society into a wider Atlantic world and explains the meaningful ways that early North Carolina was truly different from its hierarchical neighbors." --The Journal of American History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Historians have often glorified eighteenth-century Virginia planters' philosophical debates about the meaning of American liberty. But according to Noeleen McIlvenna, the true exemplars of egalitarian political values had fled Virginia's plantation society late in the seventeenth century to create the first successful European colony in the Albemarle, in present-day North Carolina.Making their way through the Great Dismal Swamp, runaway servants from Virginia joined other renegades to establish a free society along the most inaccessible Atlantic coastline of North America. They created a new community on the banks of Albemarle Sound, maintaining peace with neighboring Native Americans, upholding the egalitarian values of the English Revolution, and ignoring the laws of the mother country.Tapping into previously unused documents, McIlvenna explains how North Carolina's first planters struggled to impose a plantation society upon the settlers and how those early small farmers, defending a wide franchise and religious toleration, steadfastly resisted. She contends that the story of the Albemarle colony is a microcosm of the greater process by which a conglomeration of loosely settled, politically autonomous communities eventually succumbed to hierarchical social structures and elite rule. Highlighting the relationship between settlers and Native Americans, this study leads to a surprising new interpretation of the Tuscarora War.
Main Description
Historians have often glorified eighteenth-century Virginia planters' philosophical debates about the meaning of American liberty. But according to Noeleen McIlvenna, the true exemplars of egalitarian political values had fled Virginia's plantation society late in the seventeenth century to create the first successful European colony in the Albemarle, in present-day North Carolina. Making their way through the Great Dismal Swamp, runaway servants from Virginia joined other renegades to establish a free society along the most inaccessible Atlantic coastline of North America. They created a new community on the banks of Albemarle Sound, maintaining peace with neighboring Native Americans, upholding the egalitarian values of the English Revolution, and ignoring the laws of the mother country. Tapping into previously unused documents, McIlvenna explains how North Carolina's first planters struggled to impose a plantation society upon the settlers and how those early small farmers, defending a wide franchise and religious toleration, steadfastly resisted. She contends that the story of the Albemarle colony is a microcosm of the greater process by which a conglomeration of loosely settled, politically autonomous communities eventually succumbed to hierarchical social structures and elite rule. Highlighting the relationship between settlers and Native Americans, this study leads to a surprising new interpretation of the Tuscarora War.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Prologuep. 6
The First Generationp. 13
Escape to the Swamp, 1660-1663p. 15
Building the Sanctuary, 1664-1673p. 28
Culpeper's Rebellion, 1673-1680p. 46
The Rise and Fall of Seth Sothell, 1681-1695p. 71
The Second Generationp. 89
Challenge of the Anglicans I: Church Establishment, 1695-1707p. 95
Challenge of the Anglicans II: Native American Resistance, 1695-1707p. 112
Cary's Rebellion, 1708-1711p. 127
One Final Fight for Freedom, 1711-1713p. 148
Afterwordp. 161
Notesp. 165
Bibliographyp. 195
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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