Catalogue


Child of the Enlightenment : revolutionary Europe reflected in a boyhood diary /
by Arianne Baggerman and Rudolf Dekker ; translated by Diane Webb.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2009.
description
xii, 553 p. : ill.
ISBN
9789004172692 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2009.
isbn
9789004172692 (hardback : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6836457
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Arianne Baggerman directs a research program on 18th and 19th century autobiographical writing at Erasmus University Rotterdam. She has published books and articles on the history of writing, publishing and reading. Her dissertation on book publishing in the Netherlands in the 18th and 19th centuries will be published in English by Brill. Rudolf Dekker teaches history at Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is the author of Humour in Dutch Culture of the Golden Age (Palgrave 2001) and the editor of Egodocuments and History: Autobiographical Writing in its Social Context since the Middle Ages (Verloren 2002). Together with Arianne Baggerman, he directs the Institute for Egodocuments and History (www.egodocument.net).
Reviews
Review Quotes
Arianne Baggerman and Rudolf Dekker''s Child of the Enlightenment is a significant contribution to the already substantial literature on ego-documents in the early-modern world. [...]Baggerman and Dekker''s work makes clear that the eighteenth-century discovery of childhood as a distinct stage of life was connected to the incalculation of discipline in the Enlightenment''s name. [...] Baggerman and Dekker have provided a valuable service. The book is highly recommended.Michael Sauter, European History Quarterly, Vol. 42 No. 3 (2012), p. 494-496 Child of the Enlightenment is a wonderful, fascinating book, a valuable and complex achievement at the intersection of a number of different historical fields. It contributes to our understanding of the Enlightenment as an intellectual movement which real people embodied and enacted a hybrid Enlightenment full of diversity, complications and ironies. It is a social history of Europe in a period of profound transformation [...]. And it is a gripping political history of the first tumultuous years of revolution in the Netherlands in the 1790s, all from the initial perspective a child-and moving far beyond.John Cornell, H-France Review, Vol. 12 (2012) No. 3-4This is a book that is indispensable to scholars of diverse historical topics and countries. It shows the application of Enlightenment principles in home, culture, and politics and thus enriches scholars' understanding of the long 18th century. It is indispensable for anyone interested in the development of pedagogy, the values inculcated in elite child-rearing, and family life, but also the dissemination of political rhetoric across generations, changing conceptions of nature, time, space and religion. In fact it is exemplary in revealing how ideas and practice interweave. [...] a superb book.Joanne Bailey, Reviews in History, Review No. 1264A remarkable story...; …a valuable contribution not just to Dutch but also to European historiography-that is, required reading for social, medical, and political historians.Margaret C. Jacob, The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 83 (2011) No. 2, p. 396-398Altogether, this is a delightful book. …. Gracefully written and scrupulously documented, this imaginitative study offers much of interest both to specialists in related historical fields and to more general readers.Joyce Senders Pedersen, The European Legacy, Vol. 16 (2011) No. 4, p. 563-564Ingesamt is das Buch ein Opus Magnum geworden, und es bleibt zu wünschen, dass es Nachahmung findet.Pia Schmid, BIOS Vol. 24 (2011), p. 157-163[...] a book that brings together social history, political history, the history of ideas, and the history of reading in an intelligent and admirably creative way.Dorothee Sturkenboom, The Journal of Social History, Vol. 45, No. 1 (Fall 2011)The story …in Baggerman and Dekkers' insightful and poignant retelling, brings into focus the paradoxes of Enlightenment and the limitations of enlightened programs for educational and political reform. This 'exciting book' deserves a wide audience. Adriana S. Benzaquén, Journal of the History of Behavorial Sciences, Vol. 47 (2011) No. 1 (Winter), p. 109-111A biography that breaks with the rules of the genre. The story…is fascinating, dramatic, and y ultimately provides a sad commentary on human nature. Julia Douthwaite, Biography. An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, Vol. 33 (2010) No. 2, p. 403-405 Child of the Enlightenment is an extremely impressive achievement… Mark Towsey, Dutch Crossing Vol. 34 (2010) No. 3 (November), p. 278-279Le jeune Otto nous livre un témoignage particulièrement passionant […]; nous disposons là d'une étude riche sur la réception des modèles pédagogiques au temps des Lumières.Dominique Julia, Annales, Histoire, Sciences Sociales, Vol. 65 (2010), p. 1556-1558Through their engagement with Otto's dairy, Baggerman and Dekker have produced a detailed, nuanced and highly original account of the Enlightenment, 'constructed, for a change, from the bottom up'.Neil Cocks, (University of Reading) The British Society for Literature and ScienceThe authors [...] provide an excellent panoramic overview of Otto''s world and education. Drawing on a wide diversity of sources, including international and Dutch authors, pedagogical treatises and manuals, medical manuals, novels, family histories, encyclopedias, travelogues, and maps, Baggerman and Dekker carefully recreate the world in which Otto lived.Benjamin Roberts, American Historical Review, Vol 115 No. 2 (April 2010), p. 626-627 Child of the Enlightenment rests on the author''s expert knowledge of daily events in 1780s and 1790s Netherlands and adjacent cultures. Its dense and telling prose, translated into graceful English by Diane Webb, is a delight to read, and its 164 illustrations give real world images for the historical concepts discussed.Ruth B. Bottigheimer, SHARP News Vol. 20, No. 2
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Summaries
Description for Reader
All those interested in the development of autobiographical writing, the history of ideas, culture and education, and the history of the Dutch Republic and the age of the French Revolution.
Main Description
A diary kept by a boy in the 1790s sheds new light on the rise of autobiographical writing in the 19th century and sketches a panoramic view of Europe in the Age of Enlightenment. The French Revolution and the Batavian Revolution in the Netherlands provide the backdrop to this study, which ranges from changing perceptions of time, space and nature to the thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and its influence on such far-flung fields as education, landscape gardening and politics. The book describes the high expectations people had of science and medicine, and their disappointment at the failure of these new branches of learning to cure the world of its ills.
Main Description
A diary kept by a boy in the 1790s sheds new light on the rise of autobiographical writing in the 19th century and sketches a panoramic view of Europe in the Age of Enlightenment. The French Revolution and the Batavian Revolution in the Netherlands provide the backdrop to this study, which ranges from changing perceptions of time, space and nature to the thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and its influence on such far-flung fields as education, landscape gardening and politics. The book describes the high expectations people had of science and medicine, and their disappointment at the failure of these new branches of learning to cure the world of its ills. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Delft 2004p. 1
Prologuep. 9
Paris 1788p. 9
Border Crossingsp. 9
Restorationp. 10
Kindred Spirits in Exilep. 15
French Contactsp. 20
Modern Tourismp. 26
Delft 1789p. 37
The Family Portraitp. 37
The Ideal Boyp. 44
An Enlightened Educationp. 49
The Invention of Educational Theoryp. 49
The Example of Emilep. 52
The Philanthropinistsp. 56
Otto's Upbringing in Practicep. 65
Progress Reports in lieu of Caningsp. 70
The Little Man Withinp. 77
Otto's Diaryp. 81
Self-Knowledgep. 83
The Observational Methodp. 85
Advice on Keeping a Diaryp. 87
Exemplary Diaries: Lavater and Franklinp. 91
Writing under Supervisionp. 95
The Will to Knowledgep. 98
Battlefieldp. 101
Means of Communicationp. 105
Confessions and Indulgencesp. 107
Persuasionp. 112
Required Readingp. 119
Reading Advicep. 119
Otto's Reading Regimenp. 123
Enthusiastic but Fictional Bookwormsp. 127
Reading in the Company of Fictional Friendsp. 131
Otto's Fiction and his Realityp. 134
The Danger of an Overdosep. 145
Reading Habitsp. 148
Faulty Receptionp. 155
Required Reading 'for Pleasure'p. 163
Identifying with an American Farmerp. 167
The Garden as a Pedagogical Projectp. 171
Landscape Gardens in the Netherlandsp. 177
The Phantom of Sionp. 180
Gardening at De Ruitp. 190
The Animal Kingdomp. 194
Gardens and Recreationp. 201
'Et in Arcadia ego'p. 209
Social Worldp. 215
The Familyp. 217
Family and Ancestorsp. 228
Servantsp. 238
Friends of Both Sexesp. 239
Teachers and Clergymenp. 243
All in the Familyp. 248
The New Sociability and Freemasonryp. 253
Broadening Horizonsp. 259
The Map of Delflandp. 270
Otto Discovers the Worldp. 273
Travellingp. 279
Changing Concepts of Timep. 291
Enlightenment and the Perception of Timep. 293
Technology and Punctualityp. 299
Hours, Days, Weeks, Monthsp. 303
Reconstructing Man and Societyp. 317
Future Paradisesp. 317
Frankenstein's Monsterp. 324
Past Paradisesp. 328
Lambert's Encyclopaediap. 331
No Happiness without Orderp. 334
Improving upon the Human Bodyp. 335
Inoculation as a Moral Obligationp. 337
A Much Better Fate?p. 342
Revolution in the Netherlandsp. 345
The Beginning of an Unknown Erap. 345
Rather Decent Peoplep. 356
...or else die at our posts!p. 358
Stormy Meetings and Time Constraintsp. 364
The First Constitutionp. 371
Freedom of the Pressp. 387
Children of the Futurep. 397
Political Schoolingp. 398
Young Revolutionariesp. 401
The Revolutionary Catechismp. 402
Festivities and Rightsp. 409
Child of the Futurep. 413
Theophilanthropists and Physico-Theologiansp. 419
Enlightened Devotionp. 419
Physico-Theologyp. 431
The Vulnerable Bodyp. 443
Coping with Deathp. 443
Ter Navolgingp. 453
Illnessp. 457
Epiloguep. 471
Notesp. 485
List of Illustrationsp. 535
Indexp. 547
Illustration Creditsp. 554
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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