Catalogue


HIV and AIDS in South Asia : an economic development risk /
Markus Haacker and Mariam Claeson, editors.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : World Bank, c2009.
description
xxvi, 244 p. : ill.
ISBN
9780821378007
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : World Bank, c2009.
isbn
9780821378007
contents note
Dynamics of the HIV epidemic in South Asia -- Responding to HIV in Afghanistan -- Development impact of HIV and AIDS in South Asia -- Economic cost of HIV/AIDS in India -- The fiscal burden of AIDS treatment on South Asian health care systems -- Recurrent costs of India's free art program.
general note
Errata slip inserted.
catalogue key
6831284
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, June 2009
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text aims to identify three risks to development associated with HIV and AIDS in the South Asia region: the risk of escalation of concentrated edpidemics, the economic welfare costs, and the fiscal costs of scaling up treatment.
Main Description
HIV and AIDS in South Asia: An Economic Development Risk offers an original perspective on HIV and AIDS as major development issues for the region. Although the impact of HIV and AIDS on economic growth appears to be very small, three risks to development are associated with HIV and AIDS in South Asia: the risk of escalating concentrated epidemics, the economic welfare costs, and the fiscal costs of scaling up treatment. As the authors show, South Asian countries have relatively low estimated national HIV prevalence rates, but prevalence is growing rapidly among vulnerable groups at high risk, such as sex workers and their clients, men having sex with men, and injecting drug users and their partners.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text aims to identify three risks to development associated with HIV and AIDS in the South Asia region: the risk of escalation of concentrated epidemics, the economic welfare costs, and the fiscal costs of scaling up treatment.
Main Description
'HIV and AIDS in South Asia: An Economic Development Risk' offers an original perspective on HIV and AIDS as major development issues for the region. Although the impact of HIV and AIDS on economic growth appears to be very small, three risks to development are associated with HIV and AIDS in South Asia: the risk of escalating concentrated epidemics, the economic welfare costs, and the fiscal costs of scaling up treatment. As the authors show, South Asian countries have relatively low estimated national HIV prevalence rates, but prevalence is growing rapidly among vulnerable groups at high risk, such as sex workers and their clients, men having sex with men, and injecting drug users and their partners.The cost benefits of targeted prevention programs are high, and the financing of prevention measures such as comprehensive harm reduction and condom use is a sound economic investment in low-prevalence countries with concentrated epidemics. Interventions that reduce the risks and stigma associated with HIV and AIDS have benefits beyond the cost of lives saved; they improve the welfare of those who are at risk and those who fear contracting HIV.Treatment for AIDS in South Asia is limited at present, with weak health systems contributing to low access to and use of services. The challenges of a comprehensive scaling up of antiretroviral treatment are substantial, underscoring the crucial role of effective prevention today. The authors conclude that the limited ability of many households to pay "catastrophic" health expenses associated with treatment, as well as the negative consequences associated with poor adherence to treatment, suggest a large and central role for the public sector in the provision of antiretroviral therapy. 'HIV and AIDS in South Asia: An Economic Development Risk' will be of particular value to readers with interests in the areas of economic policy, microfinance, public health, and epidemiology.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Executive Summaryp. xvii
The Epidemiology of HIV and Prevention Strategiesp. 1
Dynamics of the HIV Epidemic in South Asiap. 3
Introductionp. 3
The Global Contextp. 4
HIV Transmission Patterns in South Asiap. 12
What Works-Lessons from HIV Prevention Interventions and Programsp. 27
Conclusions: Prevention Priorities for South Asiap. 32
Referencesp. 36
Responding to HIV in Afghanistanp. 41
Introductionp. 41
The State of the Epidemic in Afghanistanp. 42
Evidence on the Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Preventionp. 47
HIV Prevention in Afghanistan-An Economic Perspectivep. 50
Conclusionsp. 56
Notesp. 65
Referencesp. 66
The Economic and Development Impacts of HIV and AIDSp. 73
Development Impact of HIV and AIDS in South Asiap. 75
Introductionp. 75
Health and Demographic Impacts of HIV and AIDSp. 77
The Economic Impact of HIV and AIDS: Aggregate Approachesp. 84
Beyond Aggregate Measures of the Impact of HIV and AIDSp. 90
Economic Development Aspects of the Response to HIV and AIDSp. 99
Summary and Conclusionsp. 112
Notesp. 114
Referencesp. 117
Economic Cost of HIV and AIDS in Indiap. 123
Introductionp. 123
Contextp. 125
A Survey of Households Affected by HIV and AIDSp. 127
Outline of the Modelp. 141
Estimating the Costs of HIV and AIDSp. 143
Concluding Remarksp. 147
Notesp. 149
Referencesp. 151
The Burden of HIV and AIDS on the Health Sectorp. 155
The Fiscal Burden of AIDS Treatment on South Asian Health Care Systemsp. 157
Introductionp. 157
Overview of AIDS Cases and Treatment in South Asiap. 158
Future Growth of South Asian Treatment Costsp. 163
Health Care Financing in South Asian Countriesp. 167
Access to Private Health Care and the Risk of Povertyp. 170
Quality of Private vs. Public ARTp. 175
Conclusionsp. 177
Notesp. 187
Referencesp. 189
Recurrent Costs of India's Free ART Programp. 191
Introductionp. 191
India's Free ART Programp. 193
Methodology and Data Collectionp. 196
Overview of the Selected Sitesp. 201
Key Assumptions and Parametersp. 205
Costs of the ART Programp. 210
Out-of-pocket Expenditurep. 216
Projected Costs of India's Free ART Programp. 218
Discussion of Findingsp. 220
Outlookp. 223
Notesp. 234
Referencesp. 236
Indexp. 239
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