Catalogue


Done with slavery : the Black fact in Montreal, 1760-1840 /
Frank Mackey.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2010.
description
viii, 604 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0773535780, 9780773535787
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2010.
isbn
0773535780
9780773535787
catalogue key
6830347
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is an extremely important book. Mackey is a skilled writer and his subject is topical and significant, both in terms of international and Canadian scholarship. His main purpose is to recount the stories of black people in Quebec so that they are no longer forgotten, and in that he is very successful." Paul E. Lovejoy, Harriet Tubman Institute, York University
"This is an extremely important book. Mackey is a skilled writer and his subject is topical and significant, both in terms of international and Canadian scholarship. His main purpose is to recount the stories of black people in Quebec so that they are no longer forgotten, and in that he is very successful." Paul E. Lovejoy, York University
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Summaries
Main Description
Did slavery exist in Montreal, and if so what did it look like? Frank Mackey grapples with this question in Done with Slavery, a study of black Montrealers in the eighty years between the British Conquest and the union of Lower and Upper Canada. Through close examination of archival and contemporary sources, Mackey uncovers largely unknown aspects of the black transition from slavery to freedom. While he considers the changing legal status of slavery, much of the book provides a detailed and nuanced reconstruction of the circumstances of black Montrealers and their lived experience. The resulting picture is remarkably complex, showing the variety of occupations held by blacks, the relationships they had with those they served, their encounters with the judicial and political systems, and the racial mingling that came with intermarriage and apprenticeships. Done with Slavery casts the categories of blackness and slavery in a new light, showing that broad histories of the phenomenon must begin to take into account the specific of the lives of "marginal" black populations. Done with Slavery is an invitation to look at a colonial society through the prism of documented black experience, revealing that the roots of the present are neither as wholesome as some would hope nor as bitter as others might suppose. Book jacket.
Main Description
Did slavery exist in Montreal, and if so what did it look like? Frank Mackey grapples with this question in Done with Slavery, a study of black Montrealers in the eighty years between the British Conquest and the union of Lower and Upper Canada. Through close examination of archival and contemporary sources, Mackey uncovers largely unknown aspects of the black transition from slavery to freedom. While he considers the changing legal status of slavery, much of the book provides a detailed and nuanced reconstruction of the circumstances of black Montrealers and their lived experience. The resulting picture is remarkably complex, showing the variety of occupations held by blacks, the relationships they had with those they served, their encounters with the judicial and political systems, and the racial mingling that came with intermarriage and apprenticeships. Done with Slavery casts the categories of blackness and slavery in a new light, showing that broad histories of the phenomenon must begin to take into account the specifics of the lives of "marginal" black populations.Done with Slavery is an invitation to look at a colonial society through the prism of documented black experience, revealing that the roots of the present are neither as wholesome as some would hope nor as bitter as others might suppose.
Main Description
Through close examination of archival and contemporary sources, Mackey uncovers largely unknown aspects of the black transition from slavery to freedom. While he considers the changing legal status of slavery, much of the book provides a detailed and nuanced reconstruction of the circumstances of black Montrealers and their lived experience. The resulting picture is remarkably complex, showing the variety of occupations held by blacks, the relationships they had with those they served, their encounters with the judicial and political systems, and the racial mingling that came with intermarriage and apprenticeships. Done with Slavery casts the categories of blackness and slavery in a new light, showing that broad histories of the phenomenon must begin to take into account the specifics of the lives of "marginal" black populations. Done with Slavery is an invitation to look at a colonial society through the prism of documented black experience, revealing that the roots of the present are neither as wholesome as some would hope nor as bitter as others might suppose.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
What slavery?p. 15
There ought to be a lawp. 36
Still countingp. 79
"Things as they were"p. 108
Deer out of a cagep. 136
On steamboatsp. 164
Jacks of all tradesp. 183
Political coloursp. 218
The colour of justicep. 236
Shoulder to shoulder, arm in aimp. 266
One thousand characters in search of an author or twop. 292
Appendices
Newspaper notices
Slave sales and fugitivesp. 307
Miscellaneous notices referring to blacksp. 340
Three earliest advertisements by blacksp. 344
Slavery in the judges' eyesp. 345
Spoils of warp. 381
The King v. Alexander Grant, George Nixon and Moses Powell Wormleyp. 408
Abbreviationsp. 417
Notesp. 419
Sourcesp. 553
Information on illustrationsp. 577
Indexp. 581
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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