Catalogue


A fork in the road : a memoir /
André Brink.
imprint
London : Harvill Secker, 2009.
description
438 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1846552443 (Cloth), 9781846552441 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Harvill Secker, 2009.
isbn
1846552443 (Cloth)
9781846552441 (Cloth)
catalogue key
6826325
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, January 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Andr Brink grew up in the deep interior of South Africa, as his magistrate father moved from one dusty dorp to the next. With searing honesty he describes his conflicting experiences of growing up in a world where innocence was always surrounded by violence. From an early age he found in storytelling the means of reconciling the stark contrasts u between religion and play-acting, between the breathless discovery of a girl called Maureen and the merciless beating of a black boy, between a meeting with a dwarf who lived in a hole in the ground and an encounter with a magician who threatened to teach him what he hadn't bargained for. While living in Paris in the sixties his discovery of a wider artistic life, allied to the exhilaration of the student uprising of 1968, confirmed in him the desire to become a writer. At the same time the tragedy of Sharpeville crystallised his growing political awareness and sparked the decision to return home and oppose the apartheid establishment with all his strength.
Main Description
From his conflicting childhood experiences in South Africa, to his discovery in 1960s Paris of a wider artistic life, followed by his decision to return home and oppose the apartheid establishment, André Brink tells the story of a life lived in tumultuous times.
Main Description
Andre Brink grew up in the deep interior of South Africa, as his magistrate father moved from one dusty dorp to the next. With searing honesty he describes his conflicting experiences of growing up in a world where innocence was always surrounded by violence. From an early age he found in storytelling the means of reconciling the stark contrasts of his world - between religion and play-acting, between the breathless discovery of a girl called Maureen and the merciless beating of a black boy, between a meeting with a dwarf who lived in a hole in the ground and an encounter with a magician who threatened to teach him what he hadn't bargained for. While living in Paris in the sixties his discovery of a wider artistic life, allied to the exhilaration of the student uprising of 1968, confirmed in him the desire to become a writer. At the same time the tragedy of Sharpeville crystallised his growing political awareness and sparked the decision to return home and oppose the apartheid establishment with all his strength. This resulted in years of harassment by the South African secret police, in censorship, and in fractured relationships with many people close to him. Equally it led to extraordinary friendships sealed by meetings with leaders of the ANC in exile in both Africa and Europe. Andre Brink tells the story of a life lived in tumultuous times. His long love affair with music, art, the theatre, literature and sport illuminate this memoir as do relationships with remarkable women, among them the poet Ingrid Jonker, who shared and shaped his life.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From an early age the South African writer André Brink found in storytelling the means of reconciling the stark contrasts of his world between religion and play-acting, between the breathless discovery of a girl called Maureen and the merciless beating of a black boy. Here he tells the story of a life lived in tumultuous times.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From an early age the South African writer André Brink found in storytelling the means of reconciling the stark contrasts of his world between religion and play-acting, between the breathless discovery of a girl called Maureen and the merciless beating of of a black boy. Here he tells the story of a life lived in tumultuous times.
Main Description
Andr Brink grew up in the deep interior of South Africa, as his magistrate father moved from one dusty dorp to the next. With searing honesty he describes his conflicting experiences of growing up in a world where innocence was always surrounded by violence. From an early age he found in storytelling the means of reconciling the stark contrasts of his world u between religion and play-acting, between the breathless discovery of a girl called Maureen and the merciless beating of a black boy, between a meeting with a dwarf who lived in a hole in the ground and an encounter with a magician who threatened to teach him what he hadn't bargained for. While living in Paris in the sixties his discovery of a wider artistic life, allied to the exhilaration of the student uprising of 1968, confirmed in him the desire to become a writer. At the same time the tragedy of Sharpeville crystallised his growing political awareness and sparked the decision to return home and oppose the apartheid establishment with all his strength. This resulted in years of harassment by the South African secret police, in censorship, and in fractured relationships with many people close to him. Equally it led to extraordinary friendships sealed by meetings with leaders of the ANC in exile in both Africa and Europe. Andr Brink tells the story of a life lived in tumultuous times. His long love affair with music, art, the theatre, literature and sport illuminate this memoir as do relationships with remarkable women, among them the poet Ingrid Jonker, who shared and shaped his life.

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