Catalogue


William Faulkner and the southern landscape /
Charles S. Aiken.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2009.
description
xiii, 283 p.
ISBN
0820332194 (alk. paper), 9780820332192 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2009.
isbn
0820332194 (alk. paper)
9780820332192 (alk. paper)
contents note
Faulkner's vanishing South -- Geographical fact into fiction -- A place in the American South -- Old south -- Civil War -- New South -- Geographical interpretation of "the bear" -- Toward the modern South -- From Yoknapatawpha County to the world -- Faulkner's geographical legacy.
catalogue key
6821585
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
" William Faulkner and the Southern Landscape quite successfully provides a rich, thorough, and nuanced geographical context for the work that Faulkner did in his lifetime, transforming Oxford and Lafayette County into the fictional Jefferson and Yoknapatawpha County. Charles Aiken, a Mississippian, has spent a lifetime thinking about this area, watching it change. He has written a highly original contribution to the field."--Joseph R. Urgo, author of In the Age of Distraction
"William Faulkner and the Southern Landscapequite successfully provides a rich, thorough, and nuanced geographical context for the work that Faulkner did in his lifetime, transforming Oxford and Lafayette County into the fictional Jefferson and Yoknapatawpha County. Charles Aiken, a Mississippian, has spent a lifetime thinking about this area, watching it change. He has written a highly original contribution to the field."--Joseph R. Urgo, author ofIn the Age of Distraction
"Simultaneously an excellent cultural-historical geography of Mississippi and the South and perhaps the most grounded literary analysis of the work of Faulkner yet published."-- Journal of Historical Geography
"Simultaneously an excellent cultural-historical geography of Mississippi and the South and perhaps the most grounded literary analysis of the work of Faulkner yet published."--Journal of Historical Geography
" William Faulkner and the Southern Landscape is a real contribution to Faulkner studies, Southern studies, American studies, and cultural geography. It's a book one doesn't want to put down, because Aiken is always showing us something from a perspective we have not had before."--Thomas L. McHaney, author of Literary Masters: William Faulkner
"William Faulkner and the Southern Landscapeis a real contribution to Faulkner studies, Southern studies, American studies, and cultural geography. It's a book one doesn't want to put down, because Aiken is always showing us something from a perspective we have not had before."--Thomas L. McHaney, author ofLiterary Masters: William Faulkner
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Summaries
Main Description
Charles S. Aiken, a native of Mississippi who was born a few miles from Oxford, has been thinking and writing about the geography of Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County for more than thirty years. William Faulkner and the Southern Landscape is the culmination of that long-term scholarly project. It is a fresh approach to a much-studied writer and a provocative meditation on the relationship between literary imagination and place.Four main geographical questions shape Aiken's journey to the family seat of the Compsons and the Snopeses. What patterns and techniques did Faulkner use'consciously or subconsciously'to convert the real geography of Lafayette County into a fictional space? Did Faulkner intend Yoknapatawpha to serve as a microcosm of the American South? In what ways does the historical geography of Faulkner's birthplace correspond to that of the fictional world he created? Finally, what geographic legacy has Faulkner left us through the fourteen novels he set in Yoknapatawpha?With an approach, methodology, and sources primarily derived from historical geography, Aiken takes the reader on a tour of Faulkner's real and imagined worlds. The result is an informed reading of Faulkner's life and work and a refined understanding of the relation of literary worlds to the real places that inspire them.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a geography of Faulkner's Mississippi. It is the culmination of a long-term scholarly project and is a fresh approach to a much-studied writer as well as a provocative meditation on the relationship between literary imagination and place.
Bowker Data Service Summary
With an approach, methodology, and sources primarily derived from historical geography, Aiken takes the reader on a tour of Faulkner's real and imagined worlds. The result is an informed reading of Faulkner's life and work and a refined understanding of the relation of literary worlds to the real places that inspire them.
Main Description
Charles S. Aiken, a native of Mississippi who was born a few miles from Oxford, has been thinking and writing about the geography of Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County for more than thirty years. William Faulkner and the Southern Landscape is the culmination of that long-term scholarly project. It is a fresh approach to a much-studied writer and a provocative meditation on the relationship between literary imagination and place. Four main geographical questions shape Aiken's journey to the family seat of the Compsons and the Snopeses. What patterns and techniques did Faulkner use--consciously or subconsciously--to convert the real geography of Lafayette County into a fictional space? Did Faulkner intend Yoknapatawpha to serve as a microcosm of the American South? In what ways does the historical geography of Faulkner's birthplace correspond to that of the fictional world he created? Finally, what geographic legacy has Faulkner left us through the fourteen novels he set in Yoknapatawpha? With an approach, methodology, and sources primarily derived from historical geography, Aiken takes the reader on a tour of Faulkner's real and imagined worlds. The result is an informed reading of Faulkner's life and work and a refined understanding of the relation of literary worlds to the real places that inspire them.
Main Description
Charles S. Aiken, a native of Mississippi who was born a few miles from Oxford, has been thinking and writing about the geography of Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County for more than thirty years.William Faulkner and the Southern Landscapeis the culmination of that long-term scholarly project. It is a fresh approach to a much-studied writer and a provocative meditation on the relationship between literary imagination and place.Four main geographical questions shape Aiken's journey to the family seat of the Compsons and the Snopeses. What patterns and techniques did Faulkner use--consciously or subconsciously--to convert the real geography of Lafayette County into a fictional space? Did Faulkner intend Yoknapatawpha to serve as a microcosm of the American South? In what ways does the historical geography of Faulkner's birthplace correspond to that of the fictional world he created? Finally, what geographic legacy has Faulkner left us through the fourteen novels he set in Yoknapatawpha?With an approach, methodology, and sources primarily derived from historical geography, Aiken takes the reader on a tour of Faulkner's real and imagined worlds. The result is an informed reading of Faulkner's life and work and a refined understanding of the relation of literary worlds to the real places that inspire them.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Faulkner's Vanishing Southp. 1
Geographical Fact into Fictionp. 8
A Place in the American Southp. 37
Old Southp. 57
Civil Warp. 82
New Southp. 119
Geographical Interpretation of "The Bear"p. 158
Toward the Modern Southp. 175
From Yoknapatawpha County to the Worldp. 203
Faulkner's Geographical Legacyp. 218
Notesp. 235
Bibliographyp. 255
Indexp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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