Catalogue


Selling the Tudor monarchy : authority and image in sixteenth-century England /
Kevin Sharpe.
imprint
New Haven [Conn.] ; London : Yale University Press, c2009.
description
xxix, 588 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0300140983, 9780300140989
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven [Conn.] ; London : Yale University Press, c2009.
isbn
0300140983
9780300140989
contents note
I. Concepts and Methods -- 1. Representing Rule: Terms, Premises, Approaches -- II. Tudor Foundations -- 2. Founding a Dynasty, Forging an Image -- III. Representations and Reformations -- 3. Writing Reformation -- 4. Images of Royal Supremacy -- 5. Performing Supremacy -- 6. Contesting Supremacy -- IV. Representing Godly Kingship -- 7. Representations of Edward VI -- V. Representations and Reactions -- 8. Images of Mary Tudor -- VI. Representing Gloriana -- 9. Words of a Queen -- 10. 'The Portrait and Picture of the Queen's Majesty' -- 11. 'Viewed and Beheld of all Men': Queen Elizabeth and the Performance of Majesty -- 12. Contesting and Appropriating Elizabeth.
catalogue key
6817823
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-03-01:
Distinguished historian of Stuart England Sharpe (Univ. of London) turns his attention to how the Tudor kings and queens increased and extended their power through art, architecture, printing, and court ceremonies. Henry VII is no longer the colorless, capable manager of bureaucratic monarchy but one who understands how the ceremony of touching for the "King's evil" (scrofula) and controlling the royal image might both be used to reconstruct the political and social order. Henry VIII faced great challenges as he fitfully embraced Reformation; pamphlets, sermons, and books re-presented the monarch not as a papal loyalist but as Supreme Head of the Church. But the king knew (in Richard Morison's words) that men "remembered more better that they see," rather than what they read or heard. Thus, Sharpe examines how the rhetoric of image changed during the 16th century. He follows recent scholarship in viewing the theatricalization of monarchy under Elizabeth as diminishing "the divinity that doth hedge a king" once sacred monarchy was transformed into the performance of a role. Sharpe's brilliant analysis of portraits and other artwork is poorly served by the book's reproductions; they are dark and often illegible. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. R. Bisson Belmont University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A big and serious book . . . Sharpe shows with great fluency and skill that the Tudor monarchs understood the effectiveness of image."--Stephen Alford, Huntington Library Quarterly
"A big and serious book . . . Sharpe shows with great fluency and skill that the Tudor monarchs understood the effectiveness of image."--Stephen Alford,Huntington Library Quarterly
"A wonderful book about the ''media folk'' of Tudor England--artists and writers employed by a succession of monarchs to propagate an image of the sovereign. Breathtaking in its scope and a real revelation about Tudor ''spin.''"--Derek Wilson, "Writers Read" blog
"Convincing and important."-- Philological Quarterly
"Convincing and important."--Philological Quarterly
"Sharpe captures the multi-layered magnificence of Tudor monarchy and its audiences....Written by a scholar who has worked at the forefront of historical enquiry for almost three decades, the book establishes an agenda for the next generation. . .with a contagious enthusiasm that will engage general and specialist readers alike."--Janet Dickinson, History Today
"Sharpe captures the multi-layered magnificence of Tudor monarchy and its audiences..Written by a scholar who has worked at the forefront of historical enquiry for almost three decades, the book establishes an agenda for the next generation. . .with a contagious enthusiasm that will engage general and specialist readers alike."--Janet Dickinson, History Today
"Significant and powerful . . . an important book . . . a truly original study."--Ethan Shagan,Journal of British Studies
"This is a bold undertaking, but this first volume suggests that it is one very much suited to Kevin Sharpe's strengths. The prose is fluent and accessible, the ideas striking, the argument assertive and wide-ranging, based on a vast array of different sources . . . this book is immensely valuable. . . . a huge achievement. . . an important, thought-provoking and richly rewarding book which should be required reading for every early modern scholar."--Lucy Wooding, Reviews in History
"Significant and powerful . . . an important book . . . a truly original study."--Ethan Shagan, Journal of British Studies
"Sharpe''s new volume is a masterful work . . . [and] an ideal book for teachers and researchers to reference in and out of the classroom."Kristen Post Walton, American Historical Review
"Sharpe''s reading of select contemporary texts
"Sharpe's reading of select contemporary texts is often fresh and often brilliantly insightful. Methodologically, he has written a ground-breaking study of the Tudor monarchy, one likely to be consulted for many years to come."--Dale Hoak, Literature & History
"A compelling and wide-ranging account of the importance of image and representation to the Tudor monarchs . . . [this book] will be of value to scholars across the disciplines who are interested in the political culture of early modern England."Karl Gunther, Journal of Modern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The management of image in the service of power is a familiar tool of twenty-first- century politics. Yet as long ago as the sixteenth century, British monarchs deployed what we might now describe as "spin." In this book a leading historian reveals how Tudor kings and queens sought to enhance their authority by presenting themselves to best advantage. Kevin Sharpe offers the first full analysis of the verbal and visual representations of Tudor power, embracing disciplines as diverse as art history, literary studies, and the history of consumption and material culture. The author finds that those rulers who maintained the delicate balance between mystification and popularization in the art of royal representationnotably Henry VIII and Elizabeth Ienjoyed the longest reigns and often the widest support. But by the end of the sixteenth century, the perception of royalty shifted, becoming less sacred and more familiar and leaving Stuart successors to the crown to deal with a difficult legacy.
Main Description
The management of image in the service of power is a familiar tool of twenty-first- century politics. Yet as long ago as the sixteenth century, British monarchs deployed what we might now describe as "spin." In this book a leading historian reveals how Tudor kings and queens sought to enhance their authority by presenting themselves to best advantage. Kevin Sharpe offers the first full analysis of the verbal and visual representations of Tudor power, embracing disciplines as diverse as art history, literary studies, and the history of consumption and material culture. The author finds that those rulers who maintained the delicate balance between mystification and popularization in the art of royal representation--notably Henry VIII and Elizabeth I--enjoyed the longest reigns and often the widest support. But by the end of the sixteenth century, the perception of royalty shifted, becoming less sacred and more familiar and leaving Stuart successors to the crown to deal with a difficult legacy.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This analysis of the verbal and visual representations of Tudor power embraces art history, literary studies and the history of consumption and material culture.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Preface and Acknowledgementsp. xv
Introductionp. xxiii
Concepts And Methodsp. 1
Representing Rule: Terms, Premises, Approachesp. 3
Tudor Foundationsp. 59
Founding a Dynasty, Forging an Imagep. 61
Representations And Reformationsp. 79
Writing Reformationp. 81
Images of Royal Supremacyp. 129
Performing Supremacyp. 157
Contesting Supremacyp. 177
Representing Godly Kingshipp. 187
Representations of Edward VIp. 189
Representations And Reactionsp. 243
Images of Mary Tudorp. 245
Representing Glorianap. 317
Prologuep. 319
The Words of a Queenp. 324
'The Portrait and Picture of the Queen's Majesty'p. 358
'Viewed and Beheld of all Men': Queen Elizabeth and the Performance of Majestyp. 417
Contesting and Appropriating Elizabethp. 451
Epiloguep. 474
Notesp. 482
Indexp. 573
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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