Catalogue


Beyond the rhetorical presidency /
edited by Martin J. Medhurst.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 1996.
description
270 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0890967105 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 1996.
isbn
0890967105 (cloth)
general note
Papers from a conference held in 1995 at Texas A&M University.
catalogue key
681420
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-01-01:
Medhurst (speech communication, Texas A & M Univ. and program coordinator of its Presidential Rhetoric series) edited this compilation from a series of papers presented in 1995. Speech is the discipline focused on rather than political science or history. The ten essays are arranged in three sections concerned with the "evolution" of the presidency beginning with Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, "when presidential rhetoric embraced a role in passing policy, generating support and promoting public discourse." Some might have thought that the rhetoric of Washington, Jefferson, Polk, and Lincoln was also significant in those areas. In any case, the essays are earnest and well-meaning, and, as one participant notes, "the literature is burgeoning." Despite the title, few of the participants acknowledge that rhetoric has limits. Every president, however talented, cannot talk every aspiration into policy, programs, or legislation, however effective his rhetoric. Presidential watchers (general readers and faculty) will enjoy this book. S. L. Harrison University of Miami
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, December 1996
Choice, January 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
With the administrations of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, and American presidency began to undergo many profound changes. Chief among those was a radical evolution in the interaction of the president with the general public. The ten essays of this volume focus on that evolution and offer thought-provoking analyses concerning the role of presidential rhetoric in passing policy, generating support, and promoting public discourse. Beyond the Rhetorical Presidency offers scholars with an interest in speech communication, political science, and history a volume that reexamines the place and significance of presidential rhetoric.
Main Description
With the administrations of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, the American presidency underwent many profound changes. Chief among those was a radical evolution in the interaction of the president with the general public. Divided into three sections, the ten essays of this volume focus on that evolution and offer thought-provoking analyses concerning the role of presidential rhetoric in passing policy, generating support, and promoting public discourse. In Part I, Jeffrey Tulis, who introduced the concept of the rhetorical presidency more than a decade ago, considers how the dilemmas he envisioned as part of that concept change just as the political arena changes. Glen E. Thurow reflects on private virtue and public duty as aspects of presidential character. Bruce E. Gronbeck argues that the electronic age has fundamentally changed the nature and impact of presidential rhetoric and, indeed, the presidency itself, while Thomas W. Benson contemplates whether politics is even possible in the environment of current computer-mediated communications. Part II turns from theoretical and metatheoretical explorations to practical criticism in a series of case studies. Roderick P. Hart and Kathleen Kendall evaluate the significance of a single telephone conversation about civil rights between Vice President Lyndon Johnson and Theodore Sorenson in June, 1963. Using Richard Nixon's rhetoric as the example from which to draw general themes and issues, Edwin Black considers the complex moral economy that supports presidential self-invention. G. Thomas Goodnight uses the debate over Ronald Reagan's policy toward Central America to study "rhetorical history . . . contested memory and the uses of time in the service of power." Robert L. Ivie examines Graubard's critique of presidential war rhetoric in the context of the Persian Gulf action. Karlyn Kohrs Campbell presents a framework for understanding the public views of the First Lady, focusing on Hillary Rodham Clinton but drawing historical parallels. Finally, Part III of this volume offers a social scientific assessment of the theoretical and interpretive research on presidential rhetoric from one of the nation's leading scholars of the presidency, George Edwards. An introduction and afterword by series editor Martin J. Medhurst seek to clarify the nature and status of the debate about the rhetorical presidency. Beyond the Rhetorical Presidencyoffers scholars with an interest in speech communication and political science a volume that reexamines the place and significance of presidential rhetoric.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
A Tale of Two Constructs: The Rhetorical Presidency Versus Presidential Rhetoric
Revising the Rhetorical Presidencyp. 3
Dimensions of Presidential Characterp. 15
The Presidency in the Age of Secondary Oralityp. 30
Desktop Demos: New Communication Technologies and the Future of the Rhetorical Presidencyp. 50
Lyndon Johnson and the Problem of Politics: A Study in Conversationp. 77
The Invention of Nixonp. 104
Reagan, Vietnam, and Central America: Public Memory and the Politics of Fragmentationp. 122
Tragic Fear and the Rhetorical Presidency: Combating Evil in the Persian Gulfp. 153
The Rhetorical Presidency: A Two-Person Careerp. 179
Presidential Rhetoric: What Difference Does It Make?p. 199
Afterword: The Ways of Rhetoricp. 218
Notesp. 227
Contributorsp. 259
Indexp. 264
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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