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Counterfeit justice : the judicial odyssey of Texas freedwoman Azeline Hearne /
Dale Baum.
imprint
Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2009.
description
xvi, 310 p.
ISBN
0807134058 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807134054 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2009.
isbn
0807134058 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807134054 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
No place for a white man to live -- Thar am no parties on marster's plantation -- A supposed or pretended will -- Unheard of in any system of procedure -- A most wanton violation of private rights -- It seems mighty queer to me, lawyer -- Endeavoring to wrong, cheat, and defraud her -- The old house hasn't killed you yet -- Divested by the courts -- Appendix: Timeline of major legal events.
catalogue key
6810781
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
For many of the forty years of her life as a slave, Azeline Hearne cohabitated with her wealthy, unmarried master, Samuel R. Hearne. She bore him four children, only one of whom survived past early childhood. When Sam died shortly after the Civil War ended, he publicly acknowledged his relationship with Azeline and bequeathed his entire estate to their twenty-year-old mulatto son, with the provision that he take care of his mother. When their son died early in 1868, Azeline inherited one of the most profitable cotton plantations in Texas and became one of the wealthiest ex-slaves in the former Confederacy. In Counterfeit Justice, Dale Baum traces Azeline's remarkable story, detailing her ongoing legal battles to claim and maintain her legacy. Due to gaps in the available historical record and the unreliability of secondary accounts based on local Reconstruction folklore, many of the details of Azeline's story are lost to history. But Baum grounds his speculation about her life in recent scholarship on the Reconstruction era, and he puts his findings in context in the history of Robertson County. Although history has not credited Azeline Hearne with influencing the course of the law, the story of her uniquely difficult position after the Civil War gives an unprecedented view of the era, and of one solitary woman's attempt to negotiate its social and legal complexities in her struggle to find justice.
First Chapter
For many of the forty years of her life as a slave, Azeline Hearne cohabitated with her wealthy, unmarried master, Samuel R. Hearne. She bore him four children, only one of whom survived past early childhood. When Sam died shortly after the Civil War ended, he publicly acknowledged his relationship with Azeline and bequeathed his entire estate to their twenty-year-old mulatto son, with the provision that he take care of his mother. When their son died early in 1868, Azeline inherited one of the most profitable cotton plantations in Texas and became one of the wealthiest ex-slaves in the former Confederacy. In Counterfeit Justice, Dale Baum traces Azeline's remarkable story, detailing her ongoing legal battles to claim and maintain her legacy. Due to gaps in the available historical record and the unreliability of secondary accounts based on local Reconstruction folklore, many of the details of Azeline's story are lost to history. But Baum grounds his speculation about her life in recent scholarship on the Reconstruction era, and he puts his findings in context in the history of Robertson County. Although history has not credited Azeline Hearne with influencing the course of the law, the story of her uniquely difficult position after the Civil War gives an unprecedented view of the era, and of one solitary woman's attempt to negotiate its social and legal complexities in her struggle to find justice.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Abbreviations Used in Notesp. xv
Introductionp. 1
No Place for a White Man to Livep. 7
Thar Am No Parties on Marster's Plantationp. 32
A Supposed or Pretended Willp. 67
Unheard of in Any System of Procedurep. 100
A Most Wanton Violation of Private Rightsp. 131
It Seems Mighty Queer to Me, Lawyerp. 159
Endeavoring to Wrong, Cheat, and Defraud Herp. 193
The Old House Hasn't Killed You Yetp. 226
Divested by the Courtsp. 245
Conclusionp. 258
Appendix: Timeline of Major Legal Eventsp. 271
Bibliographyp. 279
Indexp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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