Catalogue


Companies in peace processes : a Guatemalan case study /
Ulrike Joras.
imprint
Bielefeld : Transcript, 2007.
description
307 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
3899426908 (pbk.), 9783899426908 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bielefeld : Transcript, 2007.
isbn
3899426908 (pbk.)
9783899426908 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6803470
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [279]-307).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
The role of private companies in violent conflicts has gained increasingly more attention in recent years. Although the private sector is often associated with sustaining conflicts, companies are also assumed to be interested and able to support the prevention, settlement and transformation of violent conflicts.This book explores the role of the private business sector during the civil war and the peace process in Guatemala. It examines and analyes the corporate positions during this period, giving a better understanding on the potentials and limits of integrating private business actors in conflict transformation.
Main Description
The role of private companies in violent conflicts has gained increasingly more attention in recent years. Although the private sector is often associated with sustaining conflicts, companies are also assumed to be interested and able to support the prevention, settlement and transformation of violent conflicts.This book explores the role of the private business sector during the civil war and the peace process in Guatemala. It examines and analyzes the corporate positions during this period, giving a better understanding on the potentials and limits of integrating private business actors in conflict transformation.
Main Description
The role of private companies in violent conflicts has gained increasingly more attention in recent years. Although the private sector is often associated with sustaining conflicts, companies are also assumed to be self-interested as well as able to support the prevention, settlement and transformation of violent conflicts. This book explores the role of the private business sector during the civil war and the peace process in Guatemala. It examines and analyses the corporate positions during this period, aiming to add to a better understanding on the potentials and limits of integrating private business actors in conflict transformation.
Table of Contents
List of Boxesp. 7
List of Graphsp. 7
List of Tablesp. 8
List of Mapsp. 8
List of Acronymsp. 9
Acknowledgmentsp. 13
Introductionp. 15
Conceptual Framework
The Business Sector in Conflict Prevention, Conflict Settlement and Peacebuilding: Potentials and Limits of a New Type of Partnershipp. 23
Corporate engagement in conflict management: Background of a new conceptp. 23
Businessmen, business associations and economic elite: A closer lookp. 28
Potential roles for business in conflict management: From conflict prevention to post-conflict peacebuildingp. 33
Who, how, where and why: A brief analysis of the demand for corporate engagement in conflict managementp. 45
Corporate Costs of War and Peacep. 51
Costs of warp. 52
Costs of peacep. 68
Is there a role for business participation in conflict management? Some conclusionsp. 79
Case Study
The Economic and Social Structure of Guatemalap. 85
The Guatemalan economy and the dominance of coffeep. 85
Economic impacts of the warp. 96
Excursion: The indigenous population in Guatemalap. 103
Structure and Role of the Private Business Sector in Guatemalap. 107
The private sector in Guatemala - its characteristics and historic political rolep. 108
Business organizations in Guatemalap. 113
The Private Business Sector during the Civil Warp. 125
The war begins: The period between 1960 and 1970p. 126
A violent interlude: Low-intensity warfare as a business climatep. 131
The second war peak: The business sector between fleeing the country and developing new conflict management strategiesp. 137
The Costs of Peace: Entering the Peace Processp. 151
Negotiating interests: The business sector during the commencement of the peace processp. 152
Progress and setback during the government of Serranop. 164
The business sector gets more involved: The peace process during the De Leon- administrationp. 177
The private sectors concurrence: The peace process comes to an endp. 201
Complying with the Peace Accords: The Private Business Sector's Role during Peace Buildingp. 213
No war but no success: A brief overview of the implementation of the peace accordsp. 214
Is there a role for the business sector in the post-settlement phase? Some general thoughtsp. 217
Difficult dialogues: Still no climate for peaceful conflict settlement?p. 219
The constitutional referendum of May 1999p. 222
Economic dimensions of peacep. 226
Conclusion and Policy Implications on Business Engagement in Conflict Managementp. 247
The business sector in the Guatemalan peace processes: Findings from the case studyp. 247
Comparison of the Guatemalan case with other peace processp. 260
Policy implicationsp. 269
Appendicesp. 271
Mapsp. 271
Destruction and damage of fincas (1978-1994)p. 274
Destroyed infrastructure (1981-1995)p. 276
Bibliographyp. 279
List of Boxes
Violent conflict and peace: Some definitionsp. 24
Definition of conflict management and related expressionsp. 34
Policy Implicationsp. 269
List of Graphs
Area planted with coffee and production between 1961 and 2002p. 88
Area planted with sugar cane and production between 1961 and 2002p. 89
Area planted in with bananas and production between 1961 and 2002p. 90
GDP growth rates in Guatemala between 1971 and 2003p. 93
Gross Domestic Product to constant market prices from 1995 in million USD between 1950 and 2001p. 93
Percent of killings and disappearances occurring in rural areas by year, 1960-1995p. 99
Number of visitors for the years 1973-2000p. 101
Foreign exchange from tourism in million USD from 1973-2000p. 101
Export value of main traditional product between 1995 and 2002p. 102
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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