Catalogue


Policing insecurity : police reform, security, and human rights in Latin America /
edited by Niels Uildriks.
imprint
Lanham, MD : Lexington Books, c2009.
description
ix, 262 p.
ISBN
0739132288 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780739132289 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Lanham, MD : Lexington Books, c2009.
isbn
0739132288 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780739132289 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Police reform, security and human rights in Latin America : an introduction / Niels Uildriks -- Recent police reforms in Latin America / Hugo Frühling -- On the long road to demilitarization and professionalization of the police in Brazil / Saima Husain -- Post-war violence and police reform in Guatemala / Marie-Louise Glebbeek -- International police assistance in Jamaica under escalated violence and institutionalized non-integrity / Niels Uildriks -- Police transformation and international cooperation : the Jamaican experience / Anthony Harriott -- Police and judicial reform in Chile / Lucia Dammert -- Police reform in Argentina : public security versus human rights / Mark Ungar -- Policing insecurity and police reform in Mexico City and beyond / Niels Uildriks.
catalogue key
6798457
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Niels Uildriks is an international police researcher and consultant.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Latin America's police reforms face a double demand to improve both police integrity and public security. Uildriks and the other authors in this volume find that progress on both fronts has been partial at best, as their analyses draw out both the challenges of reform processes but also important lessons for scholars and practitioners alike. This is a valuable contribution to the growing body of literature examining human rights and security issues in post-authoritarian environments.
Niels Uildriks has produced an outstanding book on human rights and police reform. In fascinating contrast with his recent book on human rights in post-communist societies, this reader assembles a star-studded group of Caribbean and Latin American scholars to address the issue of policing and human rights in selected nations. With globalization spreading, the magnitude of both internal and external terrorism/criminality accelerating, and transnational crime and the accompanying corruption of governments and criminal justice agencies increasing dramatically, the salience of human rights has diminished in many nations. However, this collection of scholars maintains that police-based solutions to these problems will not be realized without consideration of human rights. The book explores in depth a variety of criminal justice reforms and their implications for human rights issues in different cultural, political, and social environments. The contributors and editor not only describe the various environments but also analyze how they affect reform either positively or negatively. It is a must-read for any scholar who is interested in development, human rights, and criminal justice reform. It should be required reading for any policy maker or governmental o
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Summaries
Main Description
Profound distrust commonly characterizes not only the relationship between citizens and state institutions, but also social, as well as inter- and intra-state relations in Latin America. This impacts the effectiveness and quality of the service provided by state institutions. The degree to which police and judicial reforms are able to generate trust on these fronts is therefore an important yardstick in judging their relevance under varying circumstances of "post-authoritarian rule," but this question is largely ignored in the current literature on policing and reform. From this perspective, Policing Insecurity: Police Reform, Security, and Human Rights in Latin America suggests an agenda of future reforms for the region, drawing and building upon policing reform experiences throughout Latin America, looking at issues such as impunity, professionalization, and community policing, as well as accountability and training of the police.
Main Description
In Latin America profound distrust commonly characterizes not only the relationship between citizens and state institutions, but also social, as well as inter- and intra-state relations. This volume presents case studies on police and criminal justice reforms throughout Latin America that explore this issue, introducing an important dimension to the literature on police reform, security and human rights.
Long Description
Profound distrust commonly characterizes not only the relationship between citizens and state institutions, but also social, as well as inter- and intra-state relations. This impacts the effectiveness and quality of the service provided by state institutions. The degree to which police and judicial reforms are able to generate trust on these fronts is therefore an important yardstick to judge their relevance under varying circumstances of 'post-authoritarian rule', but this question is largely ignored in the current literature on policing and reform. From this perspective, Policing Insecurity: Police Reform, Security, and Human Rights in Latin America suggests an agenda of future reforms for the region, drawing and building upon policing reform experiences throughout the Latin America, looking at issues such as impunity, professionalization, community policing, as well as accountability and training of the police. By explicitly linking issues of state-social trust, democratic transition, human rights, and security, these case studies provide a basis for the wider discussion in the book about prerequisites for the success or failure of police reforms, thus adding to our empirical and theoretical knowledge in these areas and introducing an important dimension to the literature on police reform, security, and human rights.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Police Reform, Security, and Human Rights in Latin America: An Introductionp. 1
Recent Police Reform in Latin Americap. 21
On the Long Road to Demilitarization and Professionalization of the Police in Brazilp. 47
Post-War Violence and Police Reform in Guatemalap. 79
International Police Assistance in Jamaica under Escalated Violence and Institutionalized Non-Integrityp. 95
Police Transformation and International Cooperation-The Jamaican Experiencep. 123
Police and Judicial Reform in Chilep. 151
Police Reform in Argentina: Public Security versus Human Rightsp. 169
Policing Insecurity and Police Reform in Mexico City and Beyondp. 197
Bibliographyp. 225
Indexp. 243
On the Authorsp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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