Catalogue


You must be a basketball player : rethinking integration in the university /
Anthony Stewart.
imprint
Black Point, N.S. : Fernwood Pub., c2009.
description
126 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781552662854 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Black Point, N.S. : Fernwood Pub., c2009.
isbn
9781552662854 :
catalogue key
6789868
 
Includes bibliographical references: p. 125-126.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Anthony Stewart is Associate Professor in the English Department at Dalhousie University. His main research interest is twentieth-century African American Literature. He also teaches twentieth-century British Literature and is the author of George Orwell, Doubleness and the Value of Decency (Routledge, 2003).
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Documenting a black professor's account of his own professional experience, this study describes what it feels like to be a nonwhite academic in one of the 'big three' disciplines in the humanities - English, history, and philosophy.
Main Description
Documenting a black professor's account of his own professional experience, this study describes what it feels like to be a nonwhite academic in one of the "big three" disciplines in the humanitiesEnglish, history, and philosophy. Challenging the notion that today's Canadian universities have successfully addressed the issues of diversity, this argument warns that if professors of color cannot see academia as a liberal bastion, it can only be even more forbidding for students of color. Demonstrating how integration policies are manipulated when it comes to hiring visible minorities in the university, this reference highlights aspects such as merit that are commonly used to deny employment. Positing that institutions should deliver on their stated policies instead of hiding behind formalities, this emboldened examination will surprise those inside and outside of the academic field.
Long Description
Please understand. This is not another book about the obvious benefits of affirmative action. Instead this book describes what it feels like to be a nonwhite professor in one of the "big three" disciplines in the humanities (English, History, and Philosophy). Most of the people who work in these departments see themselves as liberal, or at least open-minded, where issues of diversity are concerned. And so they are. But as a result of this benign agreement, many white Canadian academics believe that today's universities have successfully addressed the issues of diversity. This is simply not the case. This book will surprise many, both inside and outside the university. Many people of colour working in the academy do not see it as a liberal bastion. Perhaps more pressingly, if the university looks this way to a tenured professor, one can only imagine how forbidding it looks to students of colour.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. 9
Forewordp. 11
Prefacep. 20
Introduction: Reflections of a Tenured Black Sheep, or How the University Looks to Mep. 25
Judging Books by Their Coversp. 25
The Effects of On-the-Job Discriminationp. 28
Equity Policies versus Integrationp. 32
The Way the University Looksp. 40
Prejudice versus Majoritarianismp. 45
The Myth of Meritp. 51
The Mythical Meritocracy, or Is the Best Candidate Ever Simply the Best?p. 52
Personal Preferences in Hiringp. 52
Is It Affirmative Action When...?p. 55
How "Merit" Undermines Itselfp. 59
Ignoring the Poolp. 63
Niceness versus Cowardicep. 63
Noticing Race but Ignoring the Poolp. 72
The New Function of the Canadian University?p. 78
Beyond the Myth of Meritp. 85
The Problems of Being an Onlyp. 86
On Self-Consciousnessp. 93
The Problem of Toronto, or Let Toronto Do Itp. 100
It's All About Contextp. 106
Majoritarianism, Critical Mass, and Institutional Literacyp. 111
The Necessity of Critical Massp. 111
Institutional Literacy and Its Effects on Studentsp. 115
Conclusion: If the Profession Looks This Way to Me...p. 119
Works Citedp. 125
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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