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The antelope's strategy : living in Rwanda after genocide /
a report by Jean Hatzfeld ; translated from the French by Linda Coverdale.
edition
1st American ed.
imprint
New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009.
description
vi, 242 p.
ISBN
0374271038 (alk. paper), 9780374271039 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009.
isbn
0374271038 (alk. paper)
9780374271039 (alk. paper)
general note
Translation of: La stratégie des antilopes. Paris : Seuil, 2007.
catalogue key
6784800
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2009-01-05:
The horrors of communal violence give way to quieter torments in this harrowing collection of oral histories. Hatzfeld revisits Tutsi survivors and confessed Hutu killers he interviewed in Life Laid Bare and Machete Season after the latter were unexpectedly released from prison and returned to their homes.. The official Rwandan policy of reconciliation holds: Hutu-Tutsi relations are civil, and one genocidaire even marries a Tutsi woman whose relatives were slaughtered. But to Hatzfeld, the survivors reveal inner scars-their unappeasable sense of grief, dispossession and mistrust of their neighbors, the fillip of fear whenever they encounter Hutu farmers carrying their machetes, the bitterness that justice has been sacrificed for national recovery. (Less anguished, the pardoned Hutu perpetrators express a diplomatic repentance and relief at having escaped retribution.) Hatzfeld includes nightmarish scenes from the genocide; survivors recall running for their lives for weeks on end, regressing to the status of game animals as Hutu hunting bands cut down their families and friends. Just as haunting is the spiritual aftermath: " 'I believed in honorable effort, decent behavior, the straight and narrow path,' " one Tutsi woman recalls, " '[but] from now on, I'm suspicious of moral maxims.' " (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, January 2009
Booklist, February 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
A powerful report on the aftereffects of the genocide in Rwandaand on the near impossibility of reconciliation between survivors and killers In two acclaimed previous works, the noted French journalist Jean Hatzfeld offered a profound, harrowing witness to the unimaginable pain and horror in the mass killings of one group of people by another. Combining his own analysis of the events with interviews from both the Hutu killers who carried out acts of unimaginable depravity and the Tutsi survivors who somehow managed to escape, in one, based mostly on interviews with Tutsi survivors, he explored in unprecedented depth the witnesses' understanding of the psychology of evil and their courage in survival; in the second, he probed further, in talks with a group of Hutu killers about their acts of unimaginable depravity. Now, inThe Antelope's Strategy, he returns to Rwanda seven years later to talk with both the Hutus and Tutsis he'd come to knowsome of the killers who had been released from prison or returned from Congolese exile, and the Tutsi escapees who must now tolerate them as neighbors. How are they managing with the process of reconciliation? Do you think in their hearts it is possible? The enormously varied and always surprising answers he gets suggest that the political ramifications of the international community's efforts to insist on resolution after these murderous episodes are incalculable. This is an astonishing exploration of the pain of memory, the nature of stoic hope, and the ineradicability of grief.
Main Description
A powerful report on the aftereffects of the genocide in Rwanda - and on the near impossibility of reconciliation between survivors and killers In two acclaimed previous works, the noted French journalist Jean Hatzfeld offered a profound, harrowing witness to the unimaginable pain and horror in the mass killings of one group of people by another. Combining his own analysis of the events with interviews from both the Hutu killers who carried out acts of unimaginable depravity and the Tutsi survivors who somehow managed to escape, in one, based mostly on interviews with Tutsi survivors, he explored in unprecedented depth the witnesses' understanding of the psychology of evil and their courage in survival; in the second, he probed further, in talks with a group of Hutu killers about their acts of unimaginable depravity. Now, in The Antelope's Strategy , he returns to Rwanda seven years later to talk with both the Hutus and Tutsis he'd come to know - some of the killers who had been released from prison or returned from Congolese exile, and the Tutsi escapees who must now tolerate them as neighbors. How are they managing with the process of reconciliation? Do you think in their hearts it is possible? The enormously varied and always surprising answers he gets suggest that the political ramifications of the international community's efforts to insist on resolution after these murderous episodes are incalculable. This is an astonishing exploration of the pain of memory, the nature of stoic hope, and the ineradicability of grief.
Main Description
A powerful report on the aftereffects of the genocide in Rwanda-and on the near impossibility of reconciliation between survivors and killers In two acclaimed previous works, the noted French journalist Jean Hatzfeld offered a profound, harrowing witness to the unimaginable pain and horror in the mass killings of one group of people by another. Combining his own analysis of the events with interviews from both the Hutu killers who carried out acts of unimaginable depravity and the Tutsi survivors who somehow managed to escape, in one, based mostly on interviews with Tutsi survivors, he explored in unprecedented depth the witnesses' understanding of the psychology of evil and their courage in survival; in the second, he probed further, in talks with a group of Hutu killers about their acts of unimaginable depravity.Now, in The Antelope's Strategy , he returns to Rwanda seven years later to talk with both the Hutus and Tutsis he'd come to know-some of the killers who had been released from prison or returned from Congolese exile, and the Tutsi escapees who must now tolerate them as neighbors. How are they managing with the process of reconciliation? Do you think in their hearts it is possible? The enormously varied and always surprising answers he gets suggest that the political ramifications of the international community's efforts to insist on resolution after these murderous episodes are incalculable. This is an astonishing exploration of the pain of memory, the nature of stoic hope, and the ineradicability of grief.
Main Description
A powerful report on the aftereffects of the genocide in Rwandaand on the near impossibility of reconciliation between survivors and killers In two acclaimed previous works, the noted French journalist Jean Hatzfeld offered a profound, harrowing witness to the unimaginable pain and horror in the mass killings of one group of people by another. Combining his own analysis of the events with interviews from both the Hutu killers who carried out acts of unimaginable depravity and the Tutsi survivors who somehow managed to escape, in one, based mostly on interviews with Tutsi survivors, he explored in unprecedented depth the witnesses' understanding of the psychology of evil and their courage in survival; in the second, he probed further, in talks with a group of Hutu killers about their acts of unimaginable depravity. Now, in The Antelope's Strategy , he returns to Rwanda seven years later to talk with both the Hutus and Tutsis he'd come to knowsome of the killers who had been released from prison or returned from Congolese exile, and the Tutsi escapees who must now tolerate them as neighbors. How are they managing with the process of reconciliation? Do you think in their hearts it is possible? The enormously varied and always surprising answers he gets suggest that the political ramifications of the international community's efforts to insist on resolution after these murderous episodes are incalculable. This is an astonishing exploration of the pain of memory, the nature of stoic hope, and the ineradicability of grief.
Main Description
A powerful report on the aftereffects of the genocide in Rwandaand on the near impossibility of reconciliation between survivors and killersIn two acclaimed previous works, the noted French journalist Jean Hatzfeld offered a profound, harrowing witness to the unimaginable pain and horror in the mass killings of one group of people by another. Combining his own analysis of the events with interviews from both the Hutu killers who carried out acts of unimaginable depravity and the Tutsi survivors who somehow managed to escape, in one, based mostly on interviews with Tutsi survivors, he explored in unprecedented depth the witnesses' understanding of the psychology of evil and their courage in survival; in the second, he probed further, in talks with a group of Hutu killers about their acts of unimaginable depravity.Now, inThe Antelope's Strategy, he returns to Rwanda seven years later to talk with both the Hutus and Tutsis he'd come to knowsome of the killers who had been released from prison or returned from Congolese exile, and the Tutsi escapees who must now tolerate them as neighbors. How are they managing with the process of reconciliation? Do you think in their hearts it is possible? The enormously varied and always surprising answers he gets suggest that the political ramifications of the international community's efforts to insist on resolution after these murderous episodes are incalculable. This is an astonishing exploration of the pain of memory, the nature of stoic hope, and the ineradicability of grief.
Main Description
French journalist Hatzfeld presents this powerful report on the aftereffects of the genocide in Rwanda--and on the near impossibility of reconciliation between survivors and killers.
Table of Contents
More Questions?p. 3
A Long Line of Hallelujahsp. 8
A Fatal Revelationp. 22
In Kayumbap. 33
Forest Exploitsp. 37
A Survivor's Happinessp. 54
A Little Girl In The Wrong Columnp. 58
On Main Streetp. 67
What Do you Say?p. 77
A Diabolical Truthp. 92
Who Can Take a Picture of Fear?p. 96
With Death And The Deadp. 101
The Noisy Serenade of Little Birdsp. 113
It's Not Fairp. 124
Some Sorceryp. 132
Consolée, Disgustedp. 137
Dark Visions of Africap. 142
A Scar Impossible to Hidep. 155
A Starry Skyp. 161
God never Leftp. 174
Pio And Josianep. 187
A Policy of Reconciliationp. 199
The Good Old Daysp. 213
What Have We Brought Back From Out there?p. 222
Chronology of Events in Rwanda and Especially in Nyamatap. 237
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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