Catalogue


Hearts exposed : transplants and the media in 1960s Britain /
Ayesha Nathoo.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xv, 262 p.
ISBN
1403987300 (hardback), 9781403987303 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
1403987300 (hardback)
9781403987303 (hardback)
contents note
Making the heart transplantable -- The "pump" : its disciplines, institutions, and professionals -- "Spare-part surgery" and human heart transplants -- Preparing doctors and the public -- Communicating medicine in post-war Britain -- Doctors and the control of medical communication -- Making medical news and the challenge of television -- Medical accountability -- Creating the most famous operation in the world -- Breaking news -- Louis Washkansky : the world's most famous patient -- Christiaan Barnard : South Africa's "most valued ambassador" -- "The most extraordinary programme ever shown on television" : a new medium for debating medicine --
Negotiating arenas and methods of medical debate -- Tomorrow's world in the making : shaping medical debate -- Response to the "medical circus" -- Hospital-media relations in the first British heart transplant -- Staging a press conference to manage a media event -- Continuing the story : using the press or being used -- Divided communities -- Managing medicine's image in the time of the heart transplants -- Public accountability -- "Brain death" and access to medical decision-making -- Donor supply and trust in the medical profession -- A moratorium on heart transplants.
catalogue key
6783879
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ayesha Nathoo is a Research Fellow at Clare Hall, University of Cambridge, UK, and a member of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science. Her research interests include history of modern medicine, science communication, medical humanitarianism, and post-war international health.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Ayesha Nathoo's well-reseached book provides a stimulating cultural history of these events...This is a fascinating book which is a distinctive and important addition to the growing literature on the history of science.' - Adrian Bingham, The English Historical Review 'Hearts Exposed is a lively, well-illustrated, and above all persuasive plea for better understanding of the nuances of the relationship between medicine and the media. It is a welcome addition to the series and serves the valuable function of opening up a range of exciting opportunities for further work in this broad area of research.' -Martin Conboy, The Sixties 'Hearts Exposed is an engaging contribution to our understanding of the relations between medicine and the media.' - Sir Roy Calne, The Lancet 'Readers of Hearts Exposed who, like its author, were not around when these events happened might find them as extraordinary as this book - as well written as it is well researched - is fascinating. Those of us who, like this reviewer, took part in them know that this history is as accurate as it is gripping.' - Alfred Browne, British MedicalJournal '...a provocative and important contribution in the history of modern surgery and history of postwar medicine. It is a fascinating text...' - Endeavour 'This is a timely and well-crafted contribution to current media debates over the moral and ethical responsibilities of the medical profession. Given today's furore over organ donation, it provides a much-needed historical dimension to the anxieties facing physicians, surgeons and patients about the limitations and responsibilities of medical know-how...Nathoo provides a rich account of a process of increasing public intervention in the practice of medicine in general, and transplantation in particular.' - Medical History 'By focusing on the rich British story and highlighting engagement between medicine and the media, Ayesha Nathoo's book offers an important new perspective on the history of organ transplants and deserves a wide-ranging audience.' -ISIS '...this study provides a useful research framework with which ti examine the relationship between medicine and the media.' - Sociology of Health & Illness
"Readers of Hearts Exposed who, like its author, were not around when these events happened might find them as extraordinary as this book - as well written as it is well researched - is fascinating. Those of us who, like this reviewer, took part in them know that this history is as accurate as it is gripping." -- Alfred Browne , British Medical Journal
"Readers of Hearts Exposed who, like its author, were not around when these events happened might find them as extraordinary as this book - as well written as it is well researched - is fascinating. Those of us who, like this reviewer, took part in them know that this history is as accurate as it is gripping." -- Alfred Browne, British Medical Journal
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This book examines the relationship between medicine and the media in 1960s Britain, when the first wave of heart transplants were as much media as medical events and marked a decisive period in post-war history. Public trust in their doctors was significantly undermined, and medicine was held publicly to account as never before.
Long Description
In 1968, a year not short of news, a story from within the traditionally reticent medical profession kept making headlines: transplantation of the human heart. Following the pioneering South African operation the previous year, over 100 cardiac transplants were performed worldwide, three of them in Britain. But with most recipients dead within weeks, the procedure was all but abandoned for a decade. Hearts Exposed offers the first analysis of the media involvement in the early heart transplant operations in Britain, understanding this as an integral and influential part of crucial period in medical history. Using a wealth of newly available sources, it demonstrates how, by threatening public trust in the medical profession, press and television coverage changed transplant surgery, professional ethics and the management of medical-media relations.
Description for Bookstore
Examines the relationship between medicine and the media in 1960's Britain, when the first heart transplants were as much media as medical events and marked a decisive period in post-war history
Long Description
In 1968, a year not short of news, a story from within the traditionally reticent medical profession kept making headlines: transplantation of the human heart. Following the pioneering South African operation the previous year, over 100 cardiac transplants were performed worldwide, three of them in Britain. But with most recipients dead within weeks, the procedure was all but abandoned for a decade. Hearts Exposed offers the first analysis of the media involvement in the early heart-transplant operations in Britain, understanding this as an integral part of a critical period in medical history, and a turning point in medical-media relations. Using a wealth of newly available sources, it demonstrates how unprecedented media attention reshaped professional ethics and, by threatening public trust in doctors, profoundly affected the course of transplant surgery.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text examines the relationship between medicine and the media in 1960s Britian, when the first wave of heart transplants were as much media as medical events and marked a decisive period in post-war history.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Making the Heart Transplantablep. 7
The 'pump': Its disciplines, institutions and professionalsp. 8
'Spare-part surgery' and human heart transplantsp. 15
Preparing doctors and the publicp. 25
Communicating Medicine in Post-War Britainp. 33
Doctors and the control of medical communicationp. 34
Making medical news and the challenge of televisionp. 42
Medical accountabilityp. 48
Creating the Most Famous Operation in the Worldp. 57
Breaking newsp. 58
The world's most famous patientp. 65
South Africa's 'most valued ambassador'p. 74
'The Most Extraordinary Programme Ever Shown on Television': A New Medium for Debating Medicinep. 86
Negotiating arenas and methods of medical debatep. 87
Tomorrow's World in the making: Shaping medical debatep. 91
Response to the 'medical circus'p. 102
Hospital-Media Relations in the First British Heart Transplantp. 111
Staging a press conference to manage a media eventp. 112
Continuing the story: Using the press or being used?p. 126
Divided communitiesp. 135
Managing Medicine's Image in the 'Time of the Heart Transplants'p. 147
Public accountabilityp. 148
'Brain death' and access to medical decision-makingp. 155
Donor supply and trust in the medical professionp. 161
A moratorium on heart transplantsp. 168
Conclusionp. 182
Notesp. 195
Referencesp. 237
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 255
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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