Catalogue


Chicana and Chicano art : ProtestArte /
Carlos Francisco Jackson.
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, 2009.
description
xii, 225 p.
ISBN
0816526478 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780816526475 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, 2009.
isbn
0816526478 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780816526475 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6778952
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
The visual arts history of the US Chicano community is complex. Grounded in Mexican artistic and social experiments after the revolution that were centered on notions of legibility, mass dissemination of ideological messages, and the importance of the indigenous population, the Chicano/a visual arts developed in the 1960s as a catalyst to unite Americans of Mexican descent through themes that represented, or at least expressed common experiences and values. Jackson (Univ. of California, Davis) not only describes this history but defines the very conditions of who and what characterizes the Chicano movement. As an introductory overview of the history, themes, and concerns that are expressed within its art, the book addresses issues of immigration, pre-Columbian legacies, feminism and sexuality, and family traditions. It deals with the individual and collective production of art, and concludes with a discussion of contemporary trends. Remarkable in its ambition, the book also is impressive in its clarity and didactic nature (which includes discussion questions, extended bibliographies, external sources, and a glossary). In addition, the book's black-and-white illustrations present the most paradigmatic work produced by this movement throughout its history. Summing Up: Essential. Lower- and upper-level undergraduates; general readers. L. E. Carranza Roger Williams University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
This is the first book solely dedicated to the history, development, and present-day flowering of Chicana and Chicano visual arts. It offers readers an opportunity to understand and appreciate Chicana/o art from its beginnings in the 1960s, its relationship to the Chicana/o Movement and its leading artists, themes, current directions, and cultural impacts. Although the word "Chicano" once held negative connotations, students--along with civil rights activists and artists--adopted it in the late 1960s in order to reimagine and redefine what it meant to be Mexican American in the United States. Chicanismo is the ideology and spirit behind the Chicano Movement and Chicanismo unites the artists whose work is revealed and celebrated in this book. Jackson's scope is wide. He includes paintings, prints, murals, altars, sculptures, and photographs--and, of course, the artists who created them. Beginning with key influences, he describes the importance of poster and mural art, focusing on the work of the Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada and the significance of Mexican and Cuban talleres (print workshops). He examines the importance of art collectives in the United States, as well as Chicano talleres and community art centers, for the growth of the Chicano art movement. In conclusion, he considers how Chicano art has been presented to the general American public. As Jackson shows, the visual arts have both reflected and created Chicano culture in the United States. For college students--and for all readers who want to learn more about this fascinating subject--his book is an ideal introduction to an art movement with a social conscience.
Main Description
This is the first book solely dedicated to the history, development, and present-day flowering of Chicana and Chicano visual arts. It offers readers an opportunity to understand and appreciate Chicana/o art from its beginnings in the 1960s, its relationship to the Chicana/o Movement and its leading artists, themes, current directions, and cultural impacts. Although the word Chicano once held negative connotations, students along with civil rights activists and artists adopted it in the late 1960s in order to reimagine and redefine what it meant to be Mexican American in the United States. Chicanismo is the ideology and spirit behind the Chicano Movement and Chicanismo unites the artists whose work is revealed and celebrated in this book. Jackson's scope is wide. He includes paintings, prints, murals, altars, sculptures, and photographs and, of course, the artists who created them. Beginning with key influences, he describes the importance of poster and mural art, focusing on the work of the Mexican artist Jos Guadalupe Posada and the significance of Mexican and Cuban talleres (print workshops). He examines the importance of art collectives in the United States, as well as Chicano talleres and community art centers, for the growth of the Chicano art movement. In conclusion, he considers how Chicano art has been presented to the general American public. As Jackson shows, the visual arts have both reflected and created Chicano culture in the United States. For college students and for all readers who want to learn more about this fascinating subject his book is an ideal introduction to an art movement with a social conscience.
Main Description
This is the first book solely dedicated to the history, development, and present-day flowering of Chicana and Chicano visual arts. It offers readers an opportunity to understand and appreciate Chicana/o art from its beginnings in the 1960s, its relationship to the Chicana/o Movement and its leading artists, themes, current directions, and cultural impacts. Although the word Chicano once held negative connotations, students along with civil rights activists and artists adopted it in the late 1960s in order to reimagine and redefine what it meant to be Mexican American in the United States. Chicanismo is the ideology and spirit behind the Chicano Movement and Chicanismo unites the artists whose work is revealed and celebrated in this book. Jackson's scope is wide. He includes paintings, prints, murals, altars, sculptures, and photographs and, of course, the artists who created them. Beginning with key influences, he describes the importance of poster and mural art, focusing on the work of the Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada and the significance of Mexican and Cuban talleres (print workshops). He examines the importance of art collectives in the United States, as well as Chicano talleres and community art centers, for the growth of the Chicano art movement. In conclusion, he considers how Chicano art has been presented to the general American public. As Jackson shows, the visual arts have both reflected and created Chicano culture in the United States. For college students and for all readers who want to learn more about this fascinating subject his book is an ideal introduction to an art movement with a social conscience.

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