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The lost state of Franklin : America's first secession /
Kevin T. Barksdale.
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2009.
description
xi, 283 p. : map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813125219 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780813125213 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2009.
isbn
0813125219 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780813125213 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Footstool of liberty's throne : hero-making versus historiography -- Land of the Franks : the backcountry economy of upper east Tennessee -- Acts of designing men : community, conflict, and control -- Agreeable to a republican government : the rise of backcountry partisanship, 1784-1785 -- Strange spectacle of two empires : statesmanship, speculation, and the dimming fortunes of separatism -- Where the fire of peace is always kept burning : land, diplomacy, and the tragedy of the Tennessee Valley's principal people -- Death in all its various and frightful shapes : the last days of the state of Franklin -- Vassals del Rey de España : the Franklin-Spanish conspiracy, 1786-1789 -- Rocked to death in the cradle of secession : the antebellum evolution of Franklin, 1783-1861 -- Epilogue: Finding Frankland : the legacy of separation in the twentieth century.
catalogue key
6778913
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 256-272) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-01-01:
The author's venture into describing the "state of Franklin" is so fraught with the topic's enshrouding filiopietism that his historiographical adventures become a cautionary tale. Recapturing Franklin's circumstances is akin to analyzing a proverbial feud. Barksdale's quest was likewise hindered by an absence of primary documents, forcing him to rely on older works, themselves often written by individuals with a family interest in the debate. Like most historians of the early southern frontier, his way was also befogged by the omnipresent Lyman C. Draper Collections. Draper's corpus falls into several series, all of which include both primary sources and numerous reminiscences of questionable value gathered by Draper, plus his correspondence with pioneer descendants who touted their ancestral point of view. The writer's choice of Randolph Downes's 1936 publication on the Cherokee (Cherokee-American Relations in the Upper Tennessee Valley, 1776-1791) rather than more modern works is puzzling. As The Tassel, a Cherokee leader, said in 1777, the issue was land, which motivated the Franklinites, the Tiptonites, the Muscle Shoals speculators, and the frontiersmen who flirted with Spain, not to mention North Carolinians in general. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. H. O'Donnell III Marietta College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-02-01:
Barksdale's (history, Marshall Univ.) debut book recounts the four-year rise and fall of America's would-be 14th state, a cluster of Tennessee Valley counties located in what was then western North Carolina. Dismayed by the North Carolina government's failure to deliver economic support and military protection from nearby Creeks and Cherokees, a group of defiant, ambitious civic leaders, led by future Tennessee governor John Sevier, banded together in 1784 and created a sovereign state that, while never formally recognized, operated as one. After Sevier failed to form an alliance with Spain that would have provided an economic boost as well as military support, the doomed unofficial state met a predictably violent end. Barksdale provides a balanced, detailed, and myth-debunking account of the motives for the secession, the myriad reasons for the "backcountry bureaucracy's" downfall, and Franklin's long-term impact on the region. He relies heavily on primary sources such as letters, newspaper accounts, and official documents, while also providing his own analysis of the Franklin leaders' fateful political maneuvers. Deeply researched and painstakingly annotated, this work will be of particular interest to scholars studying the antebellum South. Recommended for Southern history collections in academic libraries.-Douglas King, Univ. of South Carolina Lib., Columbia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
""A riveting and complex story of settlers and leaders who struggled to establish and maintain an independent government. Although short-lived and often forgotten, Franklin rightly deserves Barksdale's engaging account." -- Paul H. Bergeron, Professor of History Emeritus, University of Tennessee" --
""A riveting and complex story of settlers and leaders who struggled to establish and maintain an independent government. Although short-lived and often forgotten, Franklin rightly deserves Barksdale's engaging account." -- Paul H. Bergeron, Professor of History Emeritus, University of Tennessee" -- Paul H. Bergeron
"Barksdale has provided a nuanced and insightful examination of the state of Franklin. The book will serve as a must-read for students of the "lost" state and of the frontier experience more broadly." -- Kristofer Ray, Ohio Valley History
""Barksdale has provided a nuanced and insightful examination of the state of Franklin. The book will serve as a must-read for students of the "lost" state and of the frontier experience more broadly."--Ohio Valley History" --
[Barksdale] provides a balanced and accessible account that would interest anyone curious about our regional history.
""[Barksdale] provides a balanced and accessible account that would interest anyone curious about our regional history."" -- Adera Causy, Chattanooga Free Press
""[Barksdale] provides a balanced and accessible account that would interest anyone curious about our regional history."--Chattanooga Free Press" --
"Barksdale's careful deconstruction of both the myths and realities of the "lost" state of Franklin should make this book a standard reference for future scholars." -- American Historical Review
""Deeply researched and painstakingly annotated, this work will be of particular interest to scholars studying the antebellum South. Recommended for Southern history collections in academic libraries."" -- Douglas King, Library Journal
""Deeply researched and painstakingly annotated, this work will be of particular interest to scholars studying the antebellum South. Recommended for Southern history collections in academic libraries."--Library Journal" --
"Dr. Barksdale writes with admirable clarity, explaining convoluted events with engaging and accessible prose, a straight-forward organizational structure, and a rare sense of passion."--David C. Hsiung, Juniata College, author of Two Worlds in the Tennessee Mountains: Exploring the Origins of Appalachian Stereotypes
""Dr. Barksdale writes with admirable clarity, explaining convoluted events with engaging and accessible prose, a straight-forward organizational structure, and a rare sense of passion."--David C. Hsiung, Juniata College, author of Two Worlds in the Tennessee Mountains: Exploring the Origins of Appalachian Stereotypes" --
""Dr. Barksdale writes with admirable clarity, explaining convoluted events with engaging and accessible prose, a straight-forward organizational structure, and a rare sense of passion."--David C. Hsiung, Juniata College, author of Two Worlds in the Tennessee Mountains: Exploring the Origins of Appalachian Stereotypes" -- David C. Hsiung
"Dr. Barksdale writes with admirable clarity, explaining convoluted events with engaging and accessible prose, a straight-forward organizational structure, and a rare sense of passion".--David Hsiung, Juniata College, author of Two Worlds in the Tennessee Mountains: Exploring the Origins of Appalachian Stereotypes
"Dr. Barksdale writes with admirable clarity, explaining convoluted events with engaging and accessible prose, a straight-forward organizational structure, and a rare sense of passion".--David Hsiung, Juniata College, author ofTwo Worlds in the Tennessee Mountains: Exploring the Origins of Appalachian Stereotypes
"Franklin's historiography is skillfully contextualized and explicated, but it is the author's painstaking reconstruction of the frequently desperate conditions of life on the early Tennessee frontier that brings the text to life." -- American Historical Review
"His book is an important study of community grow on the trans-Appalachian frontier at a time when the guidelines for future expansion were being shaped." -- Journal of Southern History
"In the twentieth century, the story of Franklin appeared in memorials and exhibits and even inspired an outdoor drama and two romance novels. The story of Franklin deserves to be explored for its legacy in all three centuries." -- Christopher E. Hendricks, Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
""In the twentieth century, the story of Franklin appeared in memorials and exhibits and even inspired an outdoor drama and two romance novels. The story of Franklin deserves to be explored for its legacy in all three centuries."--Register of the Kentucky Historical Society" --
""In this welcome contribution to the problems of governance in the early republic, Kevin Barksdale presents a history of the failed State of Franklin. Franklin's rise and fall remains an important counterpoint to much of American history because it is a story of failed possibilities."--Tennessee Historical Quarterly" --
""I was glad to see a study like this in print, and I recommend it to everyone interested in the eighteenth century or the southern frontier. Thanks to Barksdale's work, we now have a much clearer picture of this brief but fascinating episode in Tennessee history than we've ever had before. The "Lost State of Franklin" didn't endure, but in terms of scholarship, it isn't lost anymore."--Past in the Present" --
"I was glad to see a study like this in print, and I recommend it to everyone interested in the eighteenth century or the southern frontier. Thanks to Barksdale's work, we now have a much clearer picture of this brief but fascinating episode in Tennessee history than we've ever had before. The "Lost State of Franklin" didn't endure, but in terms of scholarship, it isn't lost anymore." -- Past in the Present, (pastinthepresent.wordpress.com)
"Kevin Barksdale presents the first scholarly study of the so-called "lost state" of Franklin since Samuel Cole Williams took up the subject in 1933." -- John R. Maas, North Carolina Historical Review
""Kevin Barksdale presents the first scholarly study of the so-called "lost state" of Franklin since Samuel Cole Williams took up the subject in 1933."--North Carolina Historical Review" --
""Kevin Barksdale's painstakingly researched and elegantly written study of America's first secession is required reading for everyone interested in early America, the frontier, and Appalachia." -- Ronald L. Lewis, Professor of History Emeritus, West Virginia University" --
""Kevin Barksdale's painstakingly researched and elegantly written study of America's first secession is required reading for everyone interested in early America, the frontier, and Appalachia." -- Ronald L. Lewis, Professor of History Emeritus, West Virginia University" -- Ronald L. Lewis
"The book will be valuable for regional specialists and students interested in frontier politics, as well as Appalachian history and memory more broadly." -- Bob Morrissey, West Virginia History
""The book will be valuable for regional specialists and students interested in frontier politics, as well as Appalachian history and memory more broadly."--West Virginia History" --
�The Lost State of Franklin: America�s First Secession� belongs in the reference collection of any local history buff.
"The Lost State of Franklin: America's First Secession belongs in the reference collection of any local history buff."--Bristol Herald Courier" --
"The Lost State of Franklin: America's First Secession belongs in the reference collection of any local history buff."" -- Joe Tennis, tricities.com, Bristol Herald Courier
""The Lost State of Franklin has a quality of déjà vu, which gives the reader the impression that the story has played out elsewhere. That is because the book is a microlevel reflection of the American experience. Perhaps that explains why it is so captivating and, more importantly, why it is so relevant."--Journal of American History" --
"The Lost State of Franklin has a quality of d j vu, which gives the reader the impression that the story has played out elsewhere. That is because the book is a microlevel reflection of the American experience. Perhaps that explains why it is so captivating and, more importantly, why it is so relevant." -- Journal of American History
"The Lost State of Franklin has a quality of déjà vu, which gives the reader the impression that the story has played out elsewhere. That is because the book is a microlevel reflection of the American experience. Perhaps that explains why it is so captivating and, more importantly, why it is so relevant." -- Journal of American History
"The Lost State of Franklin speaks to a range of important issues in Southern history, issues that transcend narrow debates about North Carolina and Tennessee history. No scholar has done more to delineate the myths surrounding Franklin''s statehood from the bitter political battles that animated southern frontier society."--Peter S. Carmichael, Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies, West Virginia University, author of The Last Generation: Young Virginias in Peace, War, and Reunion
"The Lost State of Franklinspeaks to a range of important issues in Southern history, issues that transcend narrow debates about North Carolina and Tennessee history. No scholar has done more to delineate the myths surrounding Franklin''s statehood from the bitter political battles that animated southern frontier society."--Peter S. Carmichael, Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies, West Virginia University, author ofThe Last Generation: Young Virginias in Peace, War, and Reunion
""The Lost State of Franklin speaks to a range of important issues in Southern history, issues that transcend narrow debates about North Carolina and Tennessee history. No scholar has done more to delineate the myths surrounding Franklin's statehood from the bitter political battles that animated southern frontier society."--Peter S. Carmichael, Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies, West Virginia University, author of The Last Generation: Young Virginias in Peace, War, and Reunion" --
"The Lost State of Franklin speaks to a range of important issues in Southern history, issues that transcend narrow debates about North Carolina and Tennessee history. No scholar has done more to delineate the myths surrounding Franklin's statehood from the bitter political battles that animated southern frontier society."--Peter S. Carmichael, Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies, West Virginia University, author of The Last Generation: Young Virginias in Peace, War, and Reunion
""The Lost State of Franklin speaks to a range of important issues in Southern history, issues that transcend narrow debates about North Carolina and Tennessee history. No scholar has done more to delineate the myths surrounding Franklin's statehood from the bitter political battles that animated southern frontier society."--Peter S. Carmichael, Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies, West Virginia University, author of The Last Generation: Young Virginias in Peace, War, and Reunion" -- Peter S. Carmichael
""The State of Franklin's ill-fated quest for statehood is among the most intriguing episodes on the early American frontier and a pivotal movement in the nation's political history. In Kevin Barksdale's very able hands, this struggle transcends its Tennessee and Appalachian setting to become an even more significant reflection on the meanings of democracy and independence in the tenuous and tumultuous postrevolutionary era of westward expansion and nation-building." -- John C. Inscoe, author of Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South" --
""The State of Franklin's ill-fated quest for statehood is among the most intriguing episodes on the early American frontier and a pivotal movement in the nation's political history. In Kevin Barksdale's very able hands, this struggle transcends its Tennessee and Appalachian setting to become an even more significant reflection on the meanings of democracy and independence in the tenuous and tumultuous postrevolutionary era of westward expansion and nation-building." -- John C. Inscoe, author of Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South" -- John C. Inscoe
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, December 2008
Library Journal, February 2009
Choice, January 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this book, the author chronicles the rise and fall of the Franklin statehood movement. Within four years the Franklinites crafted a backcountry bureaucracy, expanded their regional market economy, and nearly eradicated the southwestern frontier's Native American population.
Description for Bookstore
Amid the economic turmoil, Native American warfare, and political unrest following the Revolutionary War, the leadership of the Tennessee Valley declared their region independent from North Carolina and formed the state of Franklin. InThe Lost State of Franklin: America's First Secession, Kevin T. Barksdale chronicles the rise and fall of the ill-fated Franklin statehood movement. Barksdale describes the dramatic four years in which the Franklinites crafted a backcountry bureaucracy, expanded their regional market economy, and nearly eradicated the southwestern frontier's Native American population, all with the goal of becoming America's fourteenth state. Although the Franklin statehood movement collapsed in 1788, East Tennesseans still regard Franklin as a symbol of their rugged individualism, regional identity, and civic dignity.
Main Description
In the years following the Revolutionary War, the young American nation was in a state of chaos. Citizens pleaded with government leaders to reorganize local infrastructures and heighten regulations, but economic turmoil, Native American warfare, and political unrest persisted. By 1784, one group of North Carolina frontiersmen could no longer stand the unresponsiveness of state leaders to their growing demands. This ambitious coalition of Tennessee Valley citizens declared their region independent from North Carolina, forming the state of Franklin. The Lost State of Franklin: America's First Secessionchronicles the history of this ill-fated movement from its origins in the early settlement of East Tennessee to its eventual violent demise. Author Kevin T. Barksdale investigates how this lost state failed so ruinously, examining its history and tracing the development of its modern mythology. The Franklin independence movement emerged from the shared desires of a powerful group of landed elite, yeoman farmers, and country merchants. Over the course of four years they managed to develop a functioning state government, court system, and backcountry bureaucracy. Cloaking their motives in the rhetoric of the American Revolution, the Franklinites aimed to defend their land claims, expand their economy, and eradicate the area's Native American population. They sought admission into the union as America's fourteenth state, but their secession never garnered support from outside the Tennessee Valley. Confronted by Native American resistance and the opposition of the North Carolina government, the state of Franklin incited a firestorm of partisan and Indian violence. Despite a brief diplomatic flirtation with the nation of Spain during the state's final days, the state was never able to recover from the warfare, and Franklin collapsed in 1788. East Tennesseans now regard the lots state of Franklin as a symbol of rugged individualism and regional exceptionalism, but outside the region the movement has been largely forgotten. The Lost State of Franklinpresents the complete history of this defiant secession and examines the formation of its romanticized local legacy. In reevaluating this complex political movement, Barksdale sheds light on a remarkable Appalachian insurrection and reminds readers of the extraordinary, fragile nature of America's young independence.
Main Description
In the years following the Revolutionary War, the young American nation was in a state of chaos. Citizens pleaded with government leaders to reorganize local infrastructures and heighten regulations, but economic turmoil, Native American warfare, and political unrest persisted. By 1784, one group of North Carolina frontiersmen could no longer stand the unresponsiveness of state leaders to their growing demands. This ambitious coalition of Tennessee Valley citizens declared their region independent from North Carolina, forming the state of Franklin. The Lost State of Franklin: America's First Secession chronicles the history of this ill-fated movement from its origins in the early settlement of East Tennessee to its eventual violent demise. Author Kevin T. Barksdale investigates how this lost state failed so ruinously, examining its history and tracing the development of its modern mythology. The Franklin independence movement emerged from the shared desires of a powerful group of landed elite, yeoman farmers, and country merchants. Over the course of four years they managed to develop a functioning state government, court system, and backcountry bureaucracy. Cloaking their motives in the rhetoric of the American Revolution, the Franklinites aimed to defend their land claims, expand their economy, and eradicate the area's Native American population. They sought admission into the union as America's fourteenth state, but their secession never garnered support from outside the Tennessee Valley. Confronted by Native American resistance and the opposition of the North Carolina government, the state of Franklin incited a firestorm of partisan and Indian violence. Despite a brief diplomatic flirtation with the nation of Spain during the state's final days, the state was never able to recover from the warfare, and Franklin collapsed in 1788. East Tennesseans now regard the lots state of Franklin as a symbol of rugged individualism and regional exceptionalism, but outside the region the movement has been largely forgotten. The Lost State of Franklin presents the complete history of this defiant secession and examines the formation of its romanticized local legacy. In reevaluating this complex political movement, Barksdale sheds light on a remarkable Appalachian insurrection and reminds readers of the extraordinary, fragile nature of America's young independence.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Footstool of Liberty's Throne Hero-Making versus Historiographyp. 3
Land of the Franks The Backcountry Economy of Upper East Tennesseep. 18
Acts of Designing Men: Community, Conflict, and Controlp. 36
Agreeable to a Republican Government: The Rise of Backcountry Partisanship, 1784-1785p. 53
Strange Spectacle of Two Empires: Statesmanship, Speculation and the Dimming Fortunes of Separatismp. 72
Where the Fire of Peace Is Always Kept Burning: Land, Diplomacy, and the Tragedy of the Tennessee Valley's Principal Peoplep. 91
Death in All Its Various and Frightful Shapes: The Last Days of the State of Franklinp. 118
Vassals del Rey de Espana The Franklin-Spanish Conspiracy, 1786-1789p. 145
Rocked to Death in the Cradle of Secession: The Antebellum Evolution of Franklin, 1783-1861p. 162
Epilogue: Finding Frankland The Legacy of Separatism in the Twentieth Centuryp. 184
Notesp. 192
Bibliographyp. 256
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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