Catalogue


Social networks in Byzantine Egypt /
Giovanni Roberto Ruffini.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
description
x, 278 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521895375 (hardback), 9780521895378 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
isbn
0521895375 (hardback)
9780521895378 (hardback)
contents note
Introduction -- The centralized elite of Oxyrhynchos -- The growth of the Apions -- Aphrodito and the strong ties of village society -- Quantifying Aphrodito's social network -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
6777069
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-272) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The book's pioneering use of social-network theory, underpinned by rigorous quantitative analysis, is a welcome contribution to papyrology and the social history of the Byzantine world. The future of the field looks promising, indeed." The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Elisabeth R. O'Connell, The British Museum
"The book's pioneering use of social-network theory, underpinned by rigorous quantitative analysis, is a welcome contribution to papyrology and the social history of the Byzantine world. The future of the field looks promising, indeed."
" Ruffini has made an important and provocative addition to modern scholarship on the social history of late antiquity." --BCMR
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Social network analysis maps relationships and transactions between people and groups. This is the first book-length application of this method to the ancient world, using the abundant documentary evidence from sixth-century Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in Egypt. Professor Ruffini combines a prosopographical survey of both sites with computer analyses of the topographical and social networks in their papyri. He thereby uncovers hierarchical social structures in Oxyrhynchos not present in Aphrodito, and is able for the first time to trace the formation of the famous Apion estate. He can also use quantitative techniques to locate the central players in the Aphrodito social landscape, allowing us to see past the family of Dioskoros to discover the importance of otherwise unknown figures. He argues that the apparent social differences between Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in fact represent different levels of geographic scale, both present within the same social model.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Social network analysis maps relationships and transactions between people and groups. This textbook applies this method to the ancient world, using the abundant documentary evidence from sixth-century Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in Egypt.
Description for Bookstore
First book-length application of network analysis (the mapping of relationships and transactions within communities) to the ancient world. Using the abundant papyrological evidence from sixth-century Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in Egypt, it combines a prosopographical survey with computer analyses to reveal much about these communities' social structure.
Description for Bookstore
This 2008 text was the first book-length application of network analysis to the ancient world. Using the abundant papyrological evidence from sixth-century Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in Egypt, it combines a prosopographical survey with computer analyses to reveal much about these communities' social structure.
Main Description
Social network analysis maps relationships and transactions between people and groups. This 2008 text was the first book-length application of this method to the ancient world, using the abundant documentary evidence from sixth-century Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in Egypt. Professor Ruffini combines a prosopographical survey of both sites with computer analyses of the topographical and social networks in their papyri. He thereby uncovers hierarchical social structures in Oxyrhynchos not present in Aphrodito, and is able for the first time to trace the formation of the famous Apion estate. He can also use quantitative techniques to locate the central players in the Aphrodito social landscape, allowing us to see past the family of Dioskoros to discover the importance of otherwise unknown figures. He argues that the apparent social differences between Oxyrhynchos and Aphrodito in fact represent different levels of geographic scale, both present within the same social model.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The centralized elite of Oxyrhynchos
The growth of the Apions
Aphrodito and the strong ties of village society
Quantifying Aphrodito's social network
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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