Catalogue


Lord Leverhulme's ghosts : colonial exploitation in the Congo /
Jules Marchal ; translated by Martin Thom ; introduced by Adam Hochschild.
imprint
London ; New York : Verso, 2008.
description
xxii, 244 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1844672395, 9781844672394
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Verso, 2008.
isbn
1844672395
9781844672394
contents note
Introduction / Adam Hochschild -- The early years (1911-1922) -- The Lejeune report (1923) -- The establishment of a monopoly in the circles (1924-1926) -- In Barumbu circle (1917-1930) -- In the Basongo and Lusango circles (1923-1930) -- The Portuguese of Bumba against the HCB, act two (1928-1930) -- The coompagnie de kasai proves to be worse than the HCB (1927-1930) -- Pierre Ryckmans' report on Lusanga (1931) -- The revolt of the Pende (1931) -- The Lusanga HCB transformed into a "model employer" (1931-1932) -- Coercion and consolidated monopolies (1933-1935) -- The years between 1935 and 1939 -- The apogee of forced labour during the war (1940-1945).
general note
"This English-language edition is an abridgement of the original French text"--P. [xxiv].
catalogue key
6776828
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [225]-238) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-06-01:
William Lever, founder of Lever Brothers/Unilever and the renowned Leverhulme Trust, built his fortune by sourcing his palm products directly from plantations in the Belgian Congo. Lever's business empire in the Congo is the focus of this book. The brutalities of the Congo under the private ownership of King Leopold are well known; less well known is that the atrocities (including forced labor and starvation diets) continued under the Belgian colonial government. This book--the last of a series by Marchal, who served 40 years in the Belgian government--joins a small but important list of works documenting the continued regime of brutality in the Congo well beyond Leopold (Osumaka Likaka's Rural Society and Cotton in Colonial Zaire, CH, Jan'98, 35-2865; Samuel Nelson's Colonialism in the Congo Basin, CH, Jan'95, 32-2872; Marie-Benedicte Dembour's Recalling the Belgian Congo, 2000). Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts is not an easy read, partly because it conveys an insider's desire to account fully for the guilt or good conduct of everyone involved. The atrocities Marchal documents here are shocking; the realization that this past continues to bear on the present deepens the horror. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. Ejikeme Trinity University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led Britishenterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo. Warmly welcomed bythe murderous regime of King Leopold II, Leverhulme set up a privatekingdom reliant on the horrific Belgian system of forced labor, aprogram that reduced the population of Congo by half and accounted formore deaths than the Nazi Holocaust. In this definitive, meticulouslyresearched history, Jules Marchal exposes the nature of forced laborunder Lord Leverhulme's rule and the appalling conditions imposed uponthe people of Congo. With an extensive introduction by Adam Hochschild, Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts is an important and urgently needed account of a laboratory of colonial exploitation.
Main Description
In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led Britishenterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo. Warmly welcomed bythe murderous regime of King Leopold II, Leverhulme set up a privatekingdom reliant on the horrific Belgian system of forced labor, aprogram that reduced the population of Congo by half and accounted formore deaths than the Nazi Holocaust. In this definitive, meticulouslyresearched history, Jules Marchal exposes the nature of forced laborunder Lord Leverhulme "s rule and the appalling conditions imposed uponthe people of Congo. With an extensive introduction by Adam Hochschild,Lord Leverhulme "s Ghosts is an important and urgently needed account of a laboratory of colonial exploitation.
Main Description
In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led Britishenterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo. Warmly welcomed bythe murderous regime of King Leopold II, Leverhulme set up a privatekingdom reliant on the horrific Belgian system of forced labor, aprogram that reduced the population of Congo by half and accounted formore deaths than the Nazi Holocaust. In this definitive, meticulouslyresearched history, Jules Marchal exposes the nature of forced laborunder Lord Leverhulme's rule and the appalling conditions imposed uponthe people of Congo. With an extensive introduction by Adam Hochschild,Lord Leverhulme's Ghosts is an important and urgently needed account of a laboratory of colonial exploitation.
Main Description
In the early twentieth century, the worldwide rubber boom led British enterpreneur Lord Leverhulme to the Belgian Congo. Warmly welcomed by the murderous regime of King Leopold II, Leverhulme set up a private kingdom reliant on the horrific Belgian system of forced labor, a program that reduced the population of Congo by half and accounted for more deaths than the Nazi Holocaust. In this definitive, meticulously researched history, Jules Marchal exposes the nature of forced labor under Lord Leverhulme s rule and the appalling conditions imposed upon the people of Congo. With an extensive introduction by Adam Hochschild, Lord Leverhulme s Ghosts is an important and urgently needed account of a laboratory of colonial exploitation.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Early Years (1911-1922)p. 1
The Lejeune Report (1923)p. 23
The Establishment of a Monopoly in the Circles (1924-1926)p. 47
In Barumbu Circle (1917-1930)p. 63
In the Basongo and Lusanga Circles (1923-1930)p. 85
The Portuguese of Bumba Against the HCB, Act Two (1928-1930)p. 100
The Compagnie du Kasai Proves to be Worse Than the HCB (1927-1930)p. 116
Pierre Rycklnans' Report on Lusauga (1931)p. 133
The Revolt of the Pende (1931)p. 148
The Lusanga HCB Transformed Into a "Model Employer" (1931-1932)p. 170
Coercion and Consolidated Monopolies (1933-1935)p. 182
The Years Between 1935 and 1939p. 199
The Apogee of Forced Labour During the War (1940-1945)p. 211
Afterwordp. 217
Sourcesp. 225
Notesp. 227
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem