Catalogue


That infernal little Cuban republic : the United States and the Cuban Revolution /
Lars Schoultz.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.
description
745 p.
ISBN
080783260X (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807832608 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.
isbn
080783260X (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807832608 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Neighbors -- Heritage -- Prelude : the Truman years -- Arousal : the Eisenhower years, 1953-1958 -- Watching and waiting : the Eisenhower administration, 1959 -- 1960 : the year of pushing and shoving -- The Bay of Pigs -- State-sponsored terrorism -- He's going to be there until he dies : the Johnson administration -- Mutual hostility as a fact of life : the Nixon-Ford years -- Reconciliation and estrangement : the Carter years -- Back to square one : the Reagan years -- Unwavering hostility : the George H. W. Bush administration -- Blessings of liberty : the Clinton administration -- More blessings of liberty : the George W. Bush administration -- Conclusion: Benevolent domination.
catalogue key
6770573
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-04-01:
The Obama administration would be wise to consider Schoultz's latest book essential reading. In a massive text, Schoultz (political science, Univ. of North Carolina) tracks the failures of ten U.S. Presidents to come to grips with and understand Cuba and Castro's Cuban Revolution, illuminating this grave and persistent flaw in American diplomacy. Schoultz concludes that American attempts to "uplift" Cuba and Cubans reflect arrogance and ultimately cross the line to ignorance, attitudes he terms delusional. One President after another has approached Cuba with the "parking lot mentality," the belief that the United States could decimate and destroy Cuba at any time. Utilizing an impressive variety of primary and secondary sources (with more than 150 pages of notes), he details Cuban-American relations administration by administration, from assassination attempts on Castro's life to messages displayed to the people at large, always returning to America's lack of respect for Cuban sovereignty and right to self-determination. Ultimately, he proffers advice for how U.S. policy should adapt. This impressive new book is highly recommended; after all, neither nation is going to be moving any time soon.-Boyd Childress, Auburn Univ. Lib., AL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2009-12-01:
Writing from a liberal perspective, Schoultz (North Carolina, Chapel Hill) provides a comprehensive history and analysis of US policy toward Cuba during and after the Cold War, a policy he defines as moderated realism and considers an unproductive failure. US policy is related to a longstanding tradition of viewing Cuba from a paternalistic perspective and seeing it as a small country needing US assistance, regardless of what the Cubans themselves actually want. Indeed, the book begins with four very interesting chapters on US-Cuban relations from the 19th century though 1958. Mainly, though, using a wealth of documents and interviews, Schoultz traces the policies of ten US administrations from Eisenhower to G. W. Bush with regard to Cuba. Particular focus is placed on individual decision makers. This book sets a new standard as the reference for US policy toward a country that US officials have tended to find especially irritating. It is very well written, both clear and meticulous. That said, at over 700 pages (including almost 160 pages of notes) this work is both definitive for scholars and policy makers and long for undergraduates. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, and above. A. Siaroff University of Lethbridge
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2009-01-12:
In time for the 50th anniversary of the Cuban revolution, Schoultz, a University of North Carolina political science professor, offers an exhaustive study of the relationship between the U.S. and Cuba in the 20th and early 21st centuries. It would be a shame if the book's heft made it too intimidating for some readers to pick up, because it's an approachable, deeply satisfying narrative with a clear-eyed and persuasive critique of U.S. policy toward Cuba and, more broadly, of U.S. policy toward any weaker nation that has ever stubbornly asserted its sovereignty. Schoultz examines how the benevolent arrogance of U.S. State and Defense department advisers made schemes like the Bay of Pigs possible, and how racism steered American policy in the 20th century. He keeps the story a page-turner by maintaining his focus: analyzing U.S. policy from a U.S. perspective, speculating neither about the quality of Castro's leadership or the quality of life in Cuba. This is a gripping, expertly told story of one of the most complicated foreign policy relationship in the western hemisphere. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[This] book is delicious to read, and will inform, entertain and challenge a non-specialist public as well as a more scholarly one." - Canadian Journal of History
"This magisterial volume will become the new standard account of U.S.-Cuban relations. . . . Lucid and witty, filled with penetrating observations. . . . A delight to read. . . . Indispensable." - Hispanic American Historical Review
"This magisterial volume will become the new standard account of U.S.-Cuban relations. . . . Lucid and witty, filled with penetrating observations. . . . A delight to read. . . . Indispensable." -Hispanic American Historical Review
"This narrative history of a century of US policy towards Cuba is impressively researched and splendidly written. It becomes the instant standard on its subject. Its emphasis is on US policy since the late 1950s, its sources are principally US archives, and its sweep is comprehensive. Schoultz has a knack for identifying in the historical record the telling phrase, the apt metaphor, the outrageous statement and the powerful insight." - Journal of Latin American Studies
"This narrative history of a century of US policy towards Cuba is impressively researched and splendidly written. It becomes the instant standard on its subject. Its emphasis is on US policy since the late 1950s, its sources are principally US archives, and its sweep is comprehensive. Schoultz has a knack for identifying in the historical record the telling phrase, the apt metaphor, the outrageous statement and the powerful insight." -Journal of Latin American Studies
"The United States has normal relations with China and Vietnam. Why not with Cuba? As Lars Schoultz so well sums it up in his excellent and highly readable book, it is because the United States cannot get over its obsessive uplifting mentality, i.e., the belief that it is the sacred duty of the United States to uplift the Cuban people. Even most Cubans who want change believe they must seek it on their own. Schoultz expresses no optimism that the United States will get over its obsession any time soon."--Wayne S. Smith, former Chief of the U.S. Interests Section in Havana (1979-82)
"The Obama administration would be wise to consider Schoultz's latest book essential reading. . . . This impressive book is highly recommended." --Library Journalstarred review
"The Obama administration would be wise to consider Schoultz's latest book essential reading. . . . This impressive book is highly recommended." - Library Journal starred review
"The detail, the vivid writing, the close focus on decision makers, and the wealth of new information combine to make a terrific book for scholars, students, tourists, and policy makers. This book should become the standard reference work on U.S. policy toward Cuba."--Philip Brenner, American University
"The definitive history of US foreign policy toward revolutionary Cuba." --Clio
"The definitive history of US foreign policy toward revolutionary Cuba." - Clio
"That Infernal Little Cuban Republicis a superb chronicle of and commentary on the history of U.S.-Cuba relations. Lars Schoultz explains U.S. Cuba policy as, on balance, a failure. Tellingly, the profound depth of that failure since the end of the Cold War shames the great majority of U.S. citizens, including this one, for tolerating such special interest folly disguised in the cloak of freedom and democracy."--Lawrence B. Wilkerson, Visiting Harriman Professor of Government and Public Policy at the College of William and Mary, former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell
" That Infernal Little Cuban Republic is a superb chronicle of and commentary on the history of U.S.-Cuba relations. Lars Schoultz explains U.S. Cuba policy as, on balance, a failure. Tellingly, the profound depth of that failure since the end of the Cold War shames the great majority of U.S. citizens, including this one, for tolerating such special interest folly disguised in the cloak of freedom and democracy."--Lawrence B. Wilkerson, Visiting Harriman Professor of Government and Public Policy at the College of William and Mary, former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell
"[Schoultz lets] the principal actors speak for themselves. . . . to provide a fly-on-the-wall perspective to Washington policymaking." --Centre Daily Times
"Schoultz [writes] with insightful verve in That Infernal Little Cuban Republic , a comprehensive history of US-Cuba relations since World War II."" - The Nation
"Schoultz [writes] with insightful verve inThat Infernal Little Cuban Republic, a comprehensive history of US-Cuba relations since World War II."" -The Nation
"Schoultz [writes] with insightful verve in ###That Infernal Little Cuban Republic#, a comprehensive history of US-Cuba relations since World War II."" --The Nation
"[Schoultz lets] the principal actors speak for themselves. . . . to provide a fly-on-the-wall perspective to Washington policymaking." - Centre Daily Times
"Schoultz has an unparalleled grasp of U.S. sources--from government documents to Congressional records, unpublished memoirs and interviews with protagonists American and Cuban. His analysis is lucid and thought-provoking, and he writes exceedingly well. Reading the book is a pleasure. It is, by far, the best book on U.S. relations with Castro's Cuba. . . . A superb book." --American Historical Review
"Schoultz found all kinds of mind-boggling memos, candid phone recordings, and wacky schemes while he was researching his latest book." '”Endeavors
"Schoultz has an unparalleled grasp of U.S. sources--from government documents to Congressional records, unpublished memoirs and interviews with protagonists American and Cuban. His analysis is lucid and thought-provoking, and he writes exceedingly well. Reading the book is a pleasure. It is, by far, the best book on U.S. relations with Castro's Cuba. . . . A superb book." - American Historical Review
"Schoultz found all kinds of mind-boggling memos, candid phone recordings, and wacky schemes while he was researching his latest book." -Endeavors
"Schoultz found all kinds of mind-boggling memos, candid phone recordings, and wacky schemes while he was researching his latest book." - Endeavors
"Prodigious research across many archives has produced a tour de force that will stand as the field's preeminent diplomatic history until the papers of the most recent U.S. presidents (and perhaps also of Cuba's leaders) become available sometime in the future." --Latin American Research Review
"Prodigious research across many archives has produced a tour de force that will stand as the field's preeminent diplomatic history until the papers of the most recent U.S. presidents (and perhaps also of Cuba's leaders) become available sometime in the future." - Latin American Research Review
"Offers a more nuanced and potentially enlightening window upon the main obstacle to better US relations in the region. . . . Valuable." - The Latin American Review of Books
"Offers a more nuanced and potentially enlightening window upon the main obstacle to better US relations in the region. . . . Valuable." --The Latin American Review of Books
"Insightful...a comprehensive history of US-Cuba relations since World War II." --The Nation
"Anyone with an interest in U.S. foreign relations will appreciate Schoultz's careful historical detail, readable narrative and clear analysis." -McClatchy-Tribune News Service
"Anyone interested in the Cuban Revolution of 1959 and its aftermath will find this book to be a must read." - Colonial Latin American Historical Review
"Anyone interested in the Cuban Revolution of 1959 and its aftermath will find this book to be a must read." -Colonial Latin American Historical Review
"Anyone interested in the Cuban Revolution of 1959 and its aftermath will find this book to be a must read." '”Colonial Latin American Historical Review
"Anyone with an interest in U.S. foreign relations will appreciate Schoultz's careful historical detail, readable narrative and clear analysis." -- McClatchy-Tribune News Service
"An excellent book. . . . Will become a major reference work on US policy toward Cuba." --The Sacramento Book Review
"An . . . eminently readable account of Cuban-American relations over the past century. . . . A deeply frustrating tale, chronicled with skill by a fine historian." --Times Literary Supplement
"An excellent book. . . . Will become a major reference work on US policy toward Cuba." - The Sacramento Book Review
"An approachable, deeply satisfying narrative with a clear-eyed and persuasive critique of U.S. policy toward Cuba and, more broadly, of U.S. policy toward any weaker nation that has ever stubbornly asserted its sovereignty. . . . A page turner. . . . A gripping, expertly told story of one of the most complicated foreign policy relationships in the western hemisphere." --Publishers Weeklystarred review
"An . . . eminently readable account of Cuban-American relations over the past century. . . . A deeply frustrating tale, chronicled with skill by a fine historian." - Times Literary Supplement
"An approachable, deeply satisfying narrative with a clear-eyed and persuasive critique of U.S. policy toward Cuba and, more broadly, of U.S. policy toward any weaker nation that has ever stubbornly asserted its sovereignty. . . . A page turner. . . . A gripping, expertly told story of one of the most complicated foreign policy relationships in the western hemisphere." - Publishers Weekly starred review
"A monumental study of U.S.-Cuba relations . . . based on an extensive use of primary sources. It will undoubtedly become an indispensable tool for anyone interested in this topic." - The Journal of American History
"A monumental study of U.S.-Cuba relations . . . based on an extensive use of primary sources. It will undoubtedly become an indispensable tool for anyone interested in this topic." --The Journal of American History
"[A] comprehensive analysis of the longstanding failed American policies toward our Cuban neighbor." -Our Man in Boston
"[A] comprehensive analysis of the longstanding failed American policies toward our Cuban neighbor." '” Our Man in Boston
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, January 2009
Library Journal, April 2009
Choice, December 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Using a rich array of documents and firsthand interviews with U.S. and Cuban officials, Schoultz relates the attempts and failures of 10 U.S. administrations to end the Cuban Revolution and points to fresh prospects as a new century of U.S.-Cuban relations begins.
Main Description
Cuba has regularly given Washington a headache, Lars Schoultz observes in his comprehensive chronicle of U.S. policy toward the Cuban Revolution. Seeking relief, even the most patient U.S. officials have often been tempted to repeat what an exasperated President Theodore Roosevelt told a friend in 1906: "I am so angry with that infernal little Cuban republic that I would like to wipe its people off the face of the earth." Certainly that has been true since 1959, when a group of rebels led by Fidel Castro ousted Fulgencio Batista, a dictator known for his friendly ties to the United States, and proceeded to cause more trouble than anyone could have imagined. Using a rich array of documents and firsthand interviews with U.S. and Cuban officials, Schoultz tells the story of the attempts and failures of ten U.S. administrations to end the Cuban Revolution. He covers everything from the legendary 1960s plot to assassinate Castro using a rigged ballpoint pen to the message that recently ran across the electronic billboard of the U.S. interests section in Havana: "Communism doesn't work because people like to own stuff"--a comment attributed to the late rocker Frank Zappa. Schoultz argues that despite the overwhelming advantage in size and power that the United States enjoys over its neighbor, the Cubans' historical insistence on their right to self-determination has inevitably irritated American administrations, influenced both U.S. domestic politics and foreign policy, and led to a freeze in diplomatic relations of unprecedented longevity. Schoultz's analysis illuminates what has been a highly unproductive foreign policy and points to fresh prospects as a new century of U.S.-Cuban relations begins.
Main Description
Cuba has regularly given Washington a headache, Lars Schoultz observes in his comprehensive chronicle of U.S. policy toward the Cuban Revolution. Seeking relief, even the most patient U.S. officials have often been tempted to repeat what an exasperated President Theodore Roosevelt told a friend in 1906: "I am so angry with that infernal little Cuban republic that I would like to wipe its people off the face of the earth."Certainly that has been true since 1959, when a group of rebels led by Fidel Castro ousted Fulgencio Batista, a dictator known for his friendly ties to the United States, and proceeded to cause more trouble than anyone could have imagined. Using a rich array of documents and firsthand interviews with U.S. and Cuban officials, Schoultz tells the story of the attempts and failures of ten U.S. administrations to end the Cuban Revolution. He covers everything from the legendary 1960s plot to assassinate Castro using a rigged ballpoint pen to the message that recently ran across the electronic billboard of the U.S. interests section in Havana: "Communism doesn't work because people like to own stuff"--a comment attributed to the late rocker Frank Zappa.Schoultz argues that despite the overwhelming advantage in size and power that the United States enjoys over its neighbor, the Cubans' historical insistence on their right to self-determination has inevitably irritated American administrations, influenced both U.S. domestic politics and foreign policy, and led to a freeze in diplomatic relations of unprecedented longevity. Schoultz's analysis illuminates what has been a highly unproductive foreign policy and points to fresh prospects as a new century of U.S.-Cuban relations begins.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work presents a comprehensive chronicle of US policy towards the Cuban revolution. It tells the story of the attempts and failures of ten US administrators to end the Cuban Revolution.
Table of Contents
Introduction Neighborsp. 1
Heritagep. 13
Prelude The Truman Yearsp. 34
Arousal The Eisenhower Years, 1953-1958p. 52
Watching and Waiting The Eisenhower Administration, 1959p. 82
1960 The Year of Pushing and Shovingp. 109
The Bay of Pigsp. 142
State-Sponsored Terrorismp. 170
He's Going to Be There until He Dies The Johnson Administrationp. 213
Mutual Hostility as a Fact of Life The Nixon-Ford Yearsp. 241
Reconciliation and Estrangement The Carter Yearsp. 291
Back to Square One The Reagan Yearsp. 362
Unwavering Hostility The George H. W. Bush Administrationp. 419
Blessings of Liberty The Clinton Administrationp. 453
More Blessings of Liberty The George W. Bush Administrationp. 515
Conclusion Benevolent Dominationp. 553
Notesp. 569
Indexp. 729
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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